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110v strobe flasher circuit help

rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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I need a circuit that uses 110V/60Hz supply to drive a 100V/60Hz 90W lamp in adjustable rate strobe mode. I see flash strobe controllers for 12V selling at ebay (photo attached) but nothing in 110V.
Please share ideas or point me in the right direction. Thank you.
 

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rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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Thank you. I'm trying to use this LED light currently selling at Costco. I am hoping to make a circuit that functions like this device which is out of stock.
I've seen some circuits here but none that would drive a 110V/80W load.
 

Audioguru

Sep 24, 2016
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The flashing light is dangerous because it causes some people to have a epileptic seizure.
 

rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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The flashing light is dangerous because it causes some people to have a epileptic seizure.
Understood. My application is in the attic to humanely drive away squirrels and rats. I intend to place it on a smart plug circuit to avoid human exposure to it.
 

Externet

Aug 24, 2009
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Make a supply that converts your desired 110VAC outlet to the voltage the strobe flashers you found abundant work at. :rolleyes:
 

rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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Make a supply that converts your desired 110VAC outlet to the voltage the strobe flashers you found abundant work at. :rolleyes:
The ones abundantly available are 12V for automobile applications of a small number of LEDs. I need to use this 80W 8000 lumen LED light fixture for the large area of my attic. Further, I just want to keep it simple and insert it in the light circuit without having to modify the light fixture. lightfixture1.jpg
 

Externet

Aug 24, 2009
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Pick your flavor

81BtRinmXwL._AC_UL320_.jpg
leviton-cable-adapters-extenders-1403-i-64_600.jpg
th


Plug your 110VAC to 12VDC adapter to the outlet to supply your flasher.
 

rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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Pick your flavor
Plug your 110VAC to 12VDC adapter to the outlet to supply your flasher.
Thank you for recommendation to provide easy access for the low voltage power supply. As I've indicated earlier, that is not the issue for me since the light fixture I am trying to use is 110V based. The low voltage strobe flashers only drive low voltage and low wattage load which cannot drive this load. Am I making sense?
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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Use a 12 V flasher circuit and a solid state relay (SSR) with a low voltage control input to turn on the mains powered flashlights.
Here's an example of such an SSR.
61M6Ppl+3TL._AC_SL1155_.jpg

The input can be controlled by a DC signal between 3 V ... 32 V, 12 V would be perfect.
The output can control mains lights (Ac 110 V, 10 A or more, depending on the model.

Of course this is a Chinese knock-off, your local hardware store may have higher quality products on offer.
 

rmk9785e

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Harald Kapp

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I recommend considering a solid state relay instead of an electromechanical relay. While admitttedly more expensive, a solid state relay is much more suitable for frequent switching (flashing) than an electromechanical relay.
For example the MSR relay, a typical representative of its kind used e.g. in household appliances is rated at
- 6 operation per minute under load
- 50000 operation lifetime at 2 A load current.

If you were to use this relay at 6 operations per minute and 2 A current, the lifetime will be 8333 minutes or roughly 6 days only.

The solid state relay I linked on the contrary is rated at 21 × 106 operations and will, under the same conditions, last 2430 hours.

Of course, these are theoretical values and either of the relays may fail sooner or later than that. Also you will probably not flash 6 times per minute. Lifetime will increase with lower strobe rate.
Then there is the cost. The SSR alone is about 4 to 5 times as expensive as one of the neat modules @AnalogKid has linked to. If it weren't for the electronic waste :( that is created, you may get away with considerably less cost by using one of these modules and, if need be, replace the whole module.
 

roughshawd

Jul 13, 2020
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All the strobes they made in the 70's were 12v driven, the bulbs cost too much and the circuits overheated and started fires.
Use a voltage divider circuit and add some fans to keep the case cooler.....
 

AnalogKid

Jun 10, 2015
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All the strobes they made in the 70's were 12v driven, the bulbs cost too much and the circuits overheated and started fires.
Use a voltage divider circuit and add some fans to keep the case cooler.....
I wonder what country you are talking about. Here in the states, in the 70's, professional/entertainment/commercial strobes all ran off 110 or 220 V. Same for industrial versions. Many hobby circuits ran off 12 V, but they were using the same tubes as camera-mounted (hot-shoe) flashes. These were much lower energy, and posed no serious danger. Pro flashes had large power supplies with very large capacitor banks, and often were fan cooled.

ak
 

rmk9785e

Dec 6, 2021
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ebay has many oscillator / timer modules with on-board power relays.

5 Vdc or 12 Vdc wall wart >> on/off switch / controller >> oscillator / timer board >> AC mains and light socket

https://www.ebay.com/itm/384497305733?hash=item5985d34885:g:bB8AAOSw7cxZo44m

https://www.ebay.com/itm/144282992586?hash=item2197efbfca:g:7XoAAOSwz19gQJIN

ak
This is nice however I'm hoping to eliminate the low voltage DC supply for an adapter like the one attached which is no longer available here (and I can't find it anywhere else) that plugs into a 110V supply and delivers strobe function on the 110V outlet.
AC mains supply >> on/off switch / controller >> oscillator / timer board >> AC mains and light socket
Strobe adapter.JPG
 
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