Maker Pro
Maker Pro

A Trip Down Memory Lane (I Hope)

M

Magoo

Jan 1, 1970
0
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?

I'm trying to help a writer friend with a novel she's working on. The
hero is a nerd (my word, not her's) and she is interested in my
adventures with basic electricity when I was a kid.
 
P

Peter Bennett

Jan 1, 1970
0
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?

Number 6 Dry Cell - don't know if anyone still makes them....
 
J

John Fields

Jan 1, 1970
0
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?

---
Ahhh, yessss...

That's either the Eveready EA6 (ANSI/NEDA 906) or the Eveready IS6
(ANSI/NEDA 905) or the Eveready HS6 (ANSI/NEDA 905).

I have no clue where you can buy one. :-(
 
M

Michael Black

Jan 1, 1970
0
Peter said:
Number 6 Dry Cell - don't know if anyone still makes them....
Of course, the didn't really look like C cells. They had to two
terminals on the top, with knurled nuts to fasten the wire.

Michael
 
B

Baphomet

Jan 1, 1970
0
Magoo said:
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?


[ I remember well the battery you are talking about. It was a 1.5 volt
carbon zinc battery used both in old radio filament supplies and to fire up
the glow plug in model airplanes. I don't remember the Ever Ready number and
I don't believe it's any longer manufactured. The closest I could find on
the internet was: http://www.hobbico.com/accys/hcap0700.html ]
 
A

Anthony Fremont

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael said:
Peter Bennett ([email protected]) writes:
Of course, the didn't really look like C cells. They had to two
terminals on the top, with knurled nuts to fasten the wire.

These people had a bunch of them brand new. I think they get them from
China or something. The labels look pretty plain and much like the old
ones as I recall. I almost bought one just to have it, but I figured it
would eventually start leaking.

http://www.epo-houston.com/

Yeah their site sucks, but the phone number is there. They have scads
of old relays, sockets, switches and a bunch of NOS stuff for TV and
radio repair. They sell surplus stuff and even some new computer parts
(is there anyone who doesn't). They also have cold cathode bulbs of
various colors and lengths and inverters. If you're ever in houston you
gotta see this place. ;-)

michael
 
B

Baphomet

Jan 1, 1970
0
Baphomet said:
Magoo said:
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?


[ I remember well the battery you are talking about. It was a 1.5 volt
carbon zinc battery used both in old radio filament supplies and to fire up
the glow plug in model airplanes. I don't remember the Ever Ready number and
I don't believe it's any longer manufactured. The closest I could find on
the internet was: http://www.hobbico.com/accys/hcap0700.html ]


[ It may have been a #6
http://www.geocities.com/~stuarts1031/flashlight.html ]
 
J

JeffM

Jan 1, 1970
0
The replacement is the Energizer EN6
Anthony Fremont

I knew they had to be available or what would science labs use?

They are still used in the protective loops of burglar alarms
of folks too cheap to buy rechargable systems.
 
W

Watson A.Name - Watt Sun

Jan 1, 1970
0
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?

I'm trying to help a writer friend with a novel she's working on. The
hero is a nerd (my word, not her's) and she is interested in my
adventures with basic electricity when I was a kid.

I believe the big cells are called No. 6 Dry Cells. They are (or
were) used by the model airplane enthusiasts to start their glow plug
engines. You can probably find them at a hobby or model airplane
store or online at a similar website.

--
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
 
W

Watson A.Name - Watt Sun

Jan 1, 1970
0
Number 6 Dry Cell - don't know if anyone still makes them....

They used to be used for starting glow plug engines. But the one I
found looks like it's a regular lantern battery. Maybe it's four 1.5V
cells in parallel instead of one big cell.

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXL368&P=7


--
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
 
W

Watson A.Name - Watt Sun

Jan 1, 1970
0
Baphomet said:
Magoo said:
When I was a kid, my dad gave me a little booklet titled
something like "How to Build 6 Basic Electrical Devices".

First of all, has anyone ever heard of the book? It was a thin, soft
covered booklet -- more like a pamphlet than a book. I think he got it
at Sears, actually.

Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
battery. I thought it was just called a dry cell. But I see that that's
a generic term for the common batteries we use today. The thing was
about 6 inches high and about 2.5 inches in diameter. It looked like a
giant C cell. I know we also had them all over in the science lab at
school. Does anybody know what that battery is rightly called and
where I can get one?


[ I remember well the battery you are talking about. It was a 1.5 volt
carbon zinc battery used both in old radio filament supplies and to fire up
the glow plug in model airplanes. I don't remember the Ever Ready number and
I don't believe it's any longer manufactured. The closest I could find on
the internet was: http://www.hobbico.com/accys/hcap0700.html ]

First time I've seen a site like this. It's a great antique and
unique flashlight collection, AKA museum. Virtual, on-line, no less.

Most flashlights rotted out from corrosion, so they didn't last but a
few years. And they were so cheap, they ended up in the trash.


--
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
 
T

Terry

Jan 1, 1970
0
Second question... I remember the book called for a certain type of
Magneto telephones used two large 1.5 volt cells to provide 3
volts DC to power their carbon microphones.
A handle sticking out the side of the telephone operated an AC
generator used for signalling other people on the same line or
the 'Central' switchboard.
The cells we used were round, about three inches in diameter and
about seven inches high.
IIRC the designation was 'S' cell; they were made by Mallory
(Red/white/black), Eveready (Red/blue) and maybe other
manufacturers.
Most had two brass screw terminals on top of each cell. A few had
a sort of spring connection (which I believe was/is called a
'Fahenstock' clip?).
I estimate, judging by the current price of batteries, such an
'S' cell would, today, cost around $25-30?
Back then (1950s) the monthly fee for party line magneto phone
service was $1.67; no sales tax either. Lines with four, six or
more families on the one one line were common. I recall one with
fourteen.
 
R

Rich Grise

Jan 1, 1970
0
Boy, talk about nostalgia lane! I have a cousin who's a farmer in
Lake Crystal, Minnesota (near Mankato - by that elbow in the
Minnesota river where it floods every spring), and they've still
got everything they've ever had since they built the house over
50 years ago. They have one of those crank-type phones, just for
display, of course, and one of the original phone books - and
most of the phone numbers were 2 digits! (and I'm pretty sure
you had to call a live operator to get connected, like with one
of those plugboards like Ernestine used.)

Cheers!
Rich
 
D

Dave Turner

Jan 1, 1970
0
Top