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AC Power wiring to Light Bulb

champ1

Jul 17, 2018
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I am trying to understand how a power is connected to a light bulb. There are 2 wires coming out of the energy meter output, line and neutral. I don't understand how they are connected to the bulb.

how to know which end of the light will connect to line or neutral ?
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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In many cases. irrelevant.
Show what you have for more detailed answer.
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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It doesn’t matter which connection is used.
But keeping with the ‘norm’, the outer screw section would be neutral and the single bottom connection would be live.
As AC is alternating current, both terminals/connections will change/alternate. So, it really doesn’t matter.

EDIT: I would like to add that mains voltage can be extremely dangerous in the wrong hands and as you had to ask, I would advise you to get a professional in to help.

Martin
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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the outer screw section would be neutral and the single bottom connection would be live

It's a bayonet cap connection in the link ....... so two connections are at the bottom.
Nothing connects to the metal case.

cannot buy them anymore in Aus, all LED. (unless specials)

bayonet.jpg
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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As AC is alternating current, both terminals/connections will change/alternate. So, it really doesn’t matter.
It does matter! The live should be connected to the most shrouded part of the fitting i.e. the centre connection.
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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I didn’t look at the link because an AC bulb is/was either BC or ES. Excluding GU10s and the like.
As far as which terminal is live, it absolutely does not matter.
Now, from a house wiring perspective it would be wired with the centre bulb pin live and outer shroud neutral for ES bulbs. But BC bulbs have two connection pins on the base. The bulb holder or pendant usually comes wired and buying two can often have the wires reversed. It’s just colour coding for pendant switch line and a neutral.

Martin
 
Last edited:

AlanBartlett

Nov 7, 2022
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Nov 7, 2022
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There are LED lamps that can operate with alternating currents. They cost a little more, but you won't have to figure out anything to extend the life of conventional LEDs. I can say that I don't really like LEDs because they burn out quickly. No matter how many different models I've tried, they never last longer than 2 months. However, regular bulbs could last me half a year or more. But I was shocked when I bought some smart light bulbs for my room. They have been working smoothly for about 4 months now, and I'm certainly happy about that. Also, a huge plus is that these lamps can be controlled by phone.
 
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