Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Adventures in Computer Repair, Act II :-)

R

Rich Grise

Jan 1, 1970
0
So, I've got this W2K comp., running some CAD software, and it starts
screwing up. Like, "Unhandled exception" errors and it dumps all of my
work. So, I reinstall the app, and it's still screwing up. So, I decide
to finally run some kind of virus scan, and the machine is all infected.
Well, since I don't have money to buy antivirus stuff, I decided to just
go ahead and reinstall W2K. I'm prepared for this - I have a partition
that has _nothing_ but W2K on it, and a little 64MB (yes, sixty-four
megabytes) partition right at the boot sector. But still, Windoze is
notorious for rewriting the MBR, so I'm a little worried - the FD is
having problems (like, it won't boot off it), and I had to burn a CD to
boot into Slackware Live - or at least, use its boot kernel, for after
W2K trashes LILO.

So, I get all ready to reinstall, and when the setup disk says it's
time to reboot, it booted, of all things, LILO! Windows reassigned
all of my drives: What used to be "C:", the "BOOT" drive, became "F:,"
and "E:", where I had W2K, became "C:"; interestingly, "D:" was still
"D:".

So I have a clean install, and LILO is still in place - W2K apparently
didn't think it was important enough to bother with, or something. :)

Oh, wait! Just before I start all that S/W install, I decided to rescue a
couple of RAM modules from the MB of an office computer I had to fix. I
now have 512 MB of RAM, thank you very much. But, while installing this
"new" used RAM, I burned my finger on the CPU heat sink. WHAT??!?!?
There's NO WAY a heatsink should be that hot. No wonder the computer's
acting flaky! I powered it up, and the CPU fan didn't even turn.

So, I put the thing up on the bench, took the fan off the heatsink of
the salvage unit, and went to slap it onto the top of the existing heat
sink, and the screws weren't long enough - entirely different style of
fan.

So I epoxied it. I also re-gooped the old heat sink (with the fan
epoxied to it). The clip was a bitch to get loose.

Anyway, I've just reached in and felt my heatsink, and it's cool to
the touch. :) Please cue jokes now. ;-)

And, ironically, I was just looking at the old heatsink that I took
the fan off, and it looks like it's exactly the same clip - I could
have just swapped out the whole heatsink assembly. Oh, well, at least
I have a working computer! :)

Cheers!
Rich
 
A

Ancient_Hacker

Jan 1, 1970
0
Yeo, CPU fans can get pretty bad. Had one where the bronze bearing had
worn to about 150% of its original size!

Also you'll see cheap video cards or motherboiard chipsets with very
tiny, very very crappy fans. The fans can wear out in just a few
months. If it's your lucky day, the fan will get very noisy before it
completely fails.

While you're at it, look over all the other fans, especially the ones
in the power supply. If it's more than three years old you might
consider replacing it with a new, quieter, maybe thermally-controlled
fan. They're really cheap on eBay. If you want it to last a long
time, look for ones that have two ball bearings, not one or two cheapie
bronze oilite bearings. BTW I've seen a few fans labeled "ball
bearing", which, if you peel off that sticker, you can see a brass
bearing underneath.
 
N

Nico Coesel

Jan 1, 1970
0
Ancient_Hacker said:
Yeo, CPU fans can get pretty bad. Had one where the bronze bearing had
worn to about 150% of its original size!

Also you'll see cheap video cards or motherboiard chipsets with very
tiny, very very crappy fans. The fans can wear out in just a few
months. If it's your lucky day, the fan will get very noisy before it
completely fails.

Reminds me of a PC I had in the office. For some reason Win NT worked
fine, but Win95 crashed after a few minutes. When I opened the case I
found the cause: the cooler had completely fallen of the Pentium Pro
CPU.
 
J

JW

Jan 1, 1970
0
Totally sucks on my computer (Win98SE). Had a lot of trouble even
uninstalling it. Put computer in^ 'safe' mode. Finally got rid of it
all - I hope. |
|
Luhan |
|
|
There's your problem >------------+

Nobody should still be running that unstable pile of garbage.
 
M

Mark Fortune

Jan 1, 1970
0
Chance said:
I agree I took off Norton anti virus and went to AVG. I've been
running it for years, never had a problem. Best of all it's free*.

*for non-commercial use.

Seriously though, AVG is a nice little anti-virus. Unlike norton which
is a serious resource hog.
 
M

~misfit~

Jan 1, 1970
0
JW said:
|
|
There's your problem >------------+

Nobody should still be running that unstable pile of garbage.

I disagree. Win98SE was the best of the bunch of Win 9x OSes. (95 thru ME).
There are some PCs around that don't have the grunt to run XP but are
otherwise still useful. For those who don't want to, or can't due to program
incompatibility, to run Linux, Win98SE is the best choice. (Especially with
the 98SE 'unofficial service pack' that can be found via Google).
 
J

Jim Land

Jan 1, 1970
0
Win98SE was the best of the bunch of Win 9x OSes. (95 thru ME).
There are some PCs around that don't have the grunt to run XP but are
otherwise still useful. For those who don't want to, or can't due to
program incompatibility, to run Linux, Win98SE is the best choice.
(Especially with the 98SE 'unofficial service pack' that can be found
via Google).

Well, there's the problem. Win 98SE is no longer supported by MS,
meaning there are no patches, no fixes, no security updates. How ya
gonna keep your OS secure?
 
M

~misfit~

Jan 1, 1970
0
Nico said:
Reminds me of a PC I had in the office. For some reason Win NT worked
fine, but Win95 crashed after a few minutes. When I opened the case I
found the cause: the cooler had completely fallen of the Pentium Pro
CPU.

Win NT has the 'halt' command to help prevent the CPU from idling at 10,000
revs (simplified analogy) whereas 95 does not. Therefore the CPU is
constantly running hotter with 95, spinning it's wheels even when not doing
anything.
 
D

David Brown

Jan 1, 1970
0
Agreed - Win98SE was definitely the least of those evils. Win95 OSR2 is
not bad either (relatively) - I still have it running on an old machine.
Well, there's the problem. Win 98SE is no longer supported by MS,
meaning there are no patches, no fixes, no security updates. How ya
gonna keep your OS secure?

You keep your Win98SE machine secure the way you keep any windows
machine secure, and it has nothing to do with service packs or patches
(which are about as useful as adding more duct tape to your cardboard
shack). You use a hardware firewall on your internet connection, make
sure your email passes through *proper* filtering, use any browser other
than IE and any email program other than OE or O, and use some common sense.
 
J

JW

Jan 1, 1970
0

Good program, BUT, from the license agreement: "You must not use the
program in a network or on more than one computer." Since I have three
computers on a home network, this would violate the agreement. Avast does
not have this limitation.
 
J

joseph2k

Jan 1, 1970
0
NO said:
Well, there's the problem. Win 98SE is no longer supported by MS,
meaning there are no patches, no fixes, no security updates. How ya
gonna keep your OS secure?

Not difficult at all, mine runs behind a Linux firewall with M$OS virus,
spyware, adware, etc., protection. It is really fast on that old 800 with
512 MB of RAM.
 
M

~misfit~

Jan 1, 1970
0
David said:
Agreed - Win98SE was definitely the least of those evils. Win95 OSR2
is not bad either (relatively) - I still have it running on an old
machine.

You keep your Win98SE machine secure the way you keep any windows
machine secure, and it has nothing to do with service packs or patches
(which are about as useful as adding more duct tape to your cardboard
shack). You use a hardware firewall on your internet connection, make
sure your email passes through *proper* filtering, use any browser
other than IE and any email program other than OE or O, and use some
common sense.

Exactly.
 
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