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Batteryless bicycle lights, new kind dynamo

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Rene Tschaggelar

Jan 1, 1970
0
No battery is needed. No friction on any parts of the bicycle. Based on
a newly invented generator, this light system works regardless the
bicycle's speed and weather conditions (not like normal dynamos!).

our website: http://www.freelights.co.uk

Wow, we always wanted this kind of perpetum mobile.
.... It won't slow me down ...
( Worldwide patents panding. )
Great. Can I order a 10MW machine ?

Rene
 
T

Tim Wescott

Jan 1, 1970
0
Rene said:
Wow, we always wanted this kind of perpetum mobile.
... It won't slow me down ...
( Worldwide patents panding. )
Great. Can I order a 10MW machine ?

Rene

It's been ripped apart on this group before. The page does admit that
it's not completely dragless, but shows quite a bit of ignorance about
physics. If he's going from mechanical motion to LED's with fairly low
loss he's doing well. If he's actually generating enough light to be
seen then that's pretty good.

I suspect that he _is_ getting more efficiency at low speeds with his
tumbling magnet idea, and it's pretty easy to beat the usual
wheel-on-the-tire arrangement. I doubt that it'd light up the road like
a good generator (I've always wanted a Sturmy-Archer Dynohub).
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
No battery is needed. No friction on any parts of the bicycle. Based on
a newly invented generator, this light system works regardless the
bicycle's speed and weather conditions (not like normal dynamos!).

our website: http://www.freelights.co.uk


Hey, Conservation of Energy has finally been overcome! About time.

John
 
R

Rene Tschaggelar

Jan 1, 1970
0
Tim said:
It's been ripped apart on this group before. The page does admit that
it's not completely dragless, but shows quite a bit of ignorance about
physics. If he's going from mechanical motion to LED's with fairly low
loss he's doing well. If he's actually generating enough light to be
seen then that's pretty good.

I suspect that he _is_ getting more efficiency at low speeds with his
tumbling magnet idea, and it's pretty easy to beat the usual
wheel-on-the-tire arrangement. I doubt that it'd light up the road like
a good generator (I've always wanted a Sturmy-Archer Dynohub).

Thanks Tim,
The usual wheel-on-the-tire got improved meanwhile.
They are using brushless DC motors with rather high
efficieny. When you're out in the nowhere where at
certain wheather conditions it can be darker than
in a cow, even high brightness 10W are not that much.
The local bike store sells twin 10W beams for $100++

Rene
 
D

Don Lancaster

Jan 1, 1970
0
John said:
Hey, Conservation of Energy has finally been overcome! About time.

John

Congress just repealed it and Bush signed it, in case you did not notice.

--
Many thanks,

Don Lancaster
Synergetics 3860 West First Street Box 809 Thatcher, AZ 85552
voice: (928)428-4073 email: [email protected]

Please visit my GURU's LAIR web site at http://www.tinaja.com
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
Congress just repealed it and Bush signed it, in case you did not notice.


I thought he was a Conservative.

John
 
D

Dave

Jan 1, 1970
0
No battery is needed. No friction on any parts of the bicycle.

They are right there. Where is there friction? Drag yes, but not
friction. They do admit that on another page.
 
M

Mike Harrison

Jan 1, 1970
0
It's been ripped apart on this group before. The page does admit that
it's not completely dragless, but shows quite a bit of ignorance about
physics. If he's going from mechanical motion to LED's with fairly low
loss he's doing well. If he's actually generating enough light to be
seen then that's pretty good.

I suspect that he _is_ getting more efficiency at low speeds with his
tumbling magnet idea, and it's pretty easy to beat the usual
wheel-on-the-tire arrangement. I doubt that it'd light up the road like
a good generator (I've always wanted a Sturmy-Archer Dynohub).

There was an article in one of the mech.engineering mags (Eureka maybe) this month on a neat
product that fits inside the pedal, using a small generator and capacitor to provide lighting from
the rotation of the pedal shaft.
http://www.pedalite.com/
 
M

martin griffith

Jan 1, 1970
0
On Tue, 09 Aug 2005 08:26:17 GMT, in sci.electronics.design Mike

snip
There was an article in one of the mech.engineering mags (Eureka maybe) this month on a neat
product that fits inside the pedal, using a small generator and capacitor to provide lighting from
the rotation of the pedal shaft.
http://www.pedalite.com/
A bit OT, but the website in question has



in the top LH corner

any ideas?


martin
 
P

Paul Hovnanian P.E.

Jan 1, 1970
0
Tim said:
It's been ripped apart on this group before. The page does admit that
it's not completely dragless, but shows quite a bit of ignorance about
physics. If he's going from mechanical motion to LED's with fairly low
loss he's doing well. If he's actually generating enough light to be
seen then that's pretty good.

I suspect that he _is_ getting more efficiency at low speeds with his
tumbling magnet idea, and it's pretty easy to beat the usual
wheel-on-the-tire arrangement. I doubt that it'd light up the road like
a good generator (I've always wanted a Sturmy-Archer Dynohub).

What one needs is a lighting system with a rechargeable battery and a
generator that cuts in when the bike is going downhill or braking.
 
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