Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Blown Canon LC-E6 charger for LP-E6 batteries

DaFlea

Dec 29, 2016
4
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
4
Hello, few month ago, i put my charger on power outlet, and it suddenly blown up, with white smoke and smell like something is burning inside. With just curiosity and no knowlege about electricity, i opened my battery charger, and found out that a resistor is burned in pieces (ring color is unreadable). It printed on the board that it's R1 (resistor number 1?).
So i get a solder, and take out that piece from the board. Unfortunately, now i lost that pieces.
Now, i need to identify, what kind resistor is that, so i can order that spare part somewhere, maybe someone here can help?


Here i attach some picture

IMG_0621_Ink_LI.jpg
IMG_0624_Ink_LI (2).jpg

Thank you, sorry for my broken english.
 

davenn

Moderator
Sep 5, 2009
14,263
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
Messages
14,263
Here i attach some picture

hi ya
welcome :)

can you please do some larger pics and orientate them longways instead of vertically
up to a max of 1000 pixels on the long side

your pix are a little too small to make out the details

that resistor probably failed because something else beyond it failed ....
maybe the switching transistor in the top left corner of pic 1


Dave
 

Alec_t

Jul 7, 2015
3,591
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
3,591
The board around R1 doesn't look scorched, so it was presumably a short-duration overload which fried R1. I agree with Dave that the likely culprit is the switching transistor. It would also be worth checking what looks like a bridge rectifier, BD1, just above the circuit tracks with the saw-tooth edges in the first pic.
 

DaFlea

Dec 29, 2016
4
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
4
Hello guys, thanks for your reply. Really appreciate that.
that resistor probably failed because something else beyond it failed ....

Ahhh... After reading your comment, I do some deep search, and I found something else is blowing and burned surrounded area. I didn't know that earlier because its normally covered by transformator and a large heatsink.

IMG_0629.JPG IMG_0628.JPG
IMG_0630.JPG IMG_0635.JPG
IMG_0636.JPG IMG_0637.JPG
Is that a capacitor? And what type is that?

maybe the switching transistor in the top left corner of pic 1
I don't know, but it seems like some coating of something for me. Flux, maybe..
IMG_0634.JPG

Oh, and I'm wondering is this thing (that have large heatsink on it) is affected by that explosion? I got multimeter but don't know how to use setting. (silly me)IMG_0638.JPG
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0631.JPG
    IMG_0631.JPG
    157.5 KB · Views: 131
  • IMG_0633.JPG
    IMG_0633.JPG
    169.8 KB · Views: 125

Rayregula

Dec 20, 2016
84
Joined
Dec 20, 2016
Messages
84
I'm wondering is this thing (that have large heatsink on it) is affected by that explosion?
If something is wrong with it would not be because your capacitor blew. But there was an over voltage that caused the capacitor to blow, the over voltage might have harmed it or it may have gone bad and caused the over voltage.
 

Rayregula

Dec 20, 2016
84
Joined
Dec 20, 2016
Messages
84
Is that a capacitor? And what type is that?
Yes that is a capacitor. If by what type you mean voltage and capacitance the other side should have what your looking for. :)
 
Last edited:

73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
3,622
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
3,622
Sir DaFlea . . . . . . .

Your missing component is a 10 ohm - 2W 5% metal film . . . initial charge bufferring . . .resistor.
Might as
well leave it out until the unit has been completely checked out.
Since that would be a good point to insert a series 60 watt incandescent series lamp for permitting
an initial non destructive / shakedown power up . . . . AFTER weeding out any and all possibly bad parts being within in this raw DC power supply / SMPS section.

Initially check that the RED rectangle marked up line fuse has blown or not, then go down and check out the

4 diode sections within the BR01 BLUE rectangle marked up full wave bridge rectifier, seeing that it does not have any shorted diodes within it.

Check across the LARGE black electrolytic just behind it for any short across it.

Move down to the second RED rectangle marked MIP2G4MO switch mode IC mounted onto the heat sink at the very end of the PCB and check out all of its 7 lead interconnect possibilities for any shorts.
Pins 4 and 7 go to the internal POWER FET inside of the unit and would be the most suspect to have developed a short.

The GREEN rectangle marked electroltyic that blew its seal at the bottom and leaked electrolte, was probably the initial . . . number 1 item to go . . . . and then other semis failed after that. Your mystical, and odiferous white smoke should have originated from that electrolytic also.
And then a final . . . psssssssssssssst . . . coming from that RED chemical fuse . . . as it opened up.


This board will need those parts pulled and that area, and then, very SERIOUSLY cleaned up of all electrolytic surface residue.

PHOTO REFERENCES:

Canon_Charger.jpg

73's de Edd
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DaFlea

Dec 29, 2016
4
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
4
Man, I tought its gonna be as easy as soldering new resistor in place. Realized that theres lot of things happened here.
Initially check that the RED rectangle marked up line fuse has blown or not,
Just realized that it was a fuse! My first tought when opening this charger is, wheres that fukin fuse. And, yes, it got blown up too. I can just replace it with glass fuse with same specification, right? Because I think that woud be easier to get.
then go down and check out the

4 diode sections within the BR01 BLUE rectangle marked up full wave bridge rectifier, seeing that it does not

have any shorted diodes within it.
I've checked it with my multimeter. All of It's 4 lead is connected. Is it normal? I don't really know how to check it, tho.

Check across the LARGE black electrolytic just behind it for any short across it.
Its clean, I think nothing suspicious here :)

Move down to the second RED rectangle marked MIP2G4MO switch mode IC mounted onto the heat sink at

the very end of the PCB and check out all of its 7 lead interconnect possibilities for any shorts.
Pins 2 and 5 go to the internal POWER FET inside of the unit and would be the most suspect to have
developed a short.
Actually, mine only got 6 lead, and it seem in good condition, but definitely gonna replace this IC, just in case.

Anyway, thanks for answer mate! Awesome!
 

davenn

Moderator
Sep 5, 2009
14,263
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
Messages
14,263
Actually, mine only got 6 lead, and it seem in good condition, but definitely gonna replace this IC, just in case.


really ?
looking at it, it's in dreadful condition and there seems to be possibly missing or burnt circuit tracks around it

those big and small caps need to come out beside that IC and also the IC. The board needs to be cleaned up to see how much damage it has suffered
Then another assessment of if the unit can be repaired or not
 

73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
3,622
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
3,622
Sir DaFlea . . . . . . .


Here is an " in Englee " typical application note from Puny Sonic, on their series of SMPS power IC.
Note that it is configured to output a MUCH greater power level than is being needed and generated in your unit.

Your input line fuse is using but a mere 1 amp fuse .

Your ruptured electrolytic photo, did not expose its specifications marked side, but on this unit, the probable equivalent would be the CVCC marked unit, which is on the " HOT " AC line . . . left side of the power supply.
Should you have a breakdown of the semis within the MIP2Gxxx, that could direct a fierce voltage level through this cap directly to ground.

The large upper CIN main filter lives a long untaxed life, with it merely operating at the 50/60 cycle line input voltage and frequency level.

Any electrolytics used down in the MIP2Gxx support area have a strained life due to their having to operate at FAST switching speeds of 10s of thousands on up to 100s of thousands of cycles of operating frequencies.
They take one hell of a hammering from those full voltage transitions and are prone to failure after some years of use.

That is also being particularly true over on the " COLD " side of the circuitry on the right half winding of the central Switch Mode Transformer where you can see involved Cout and Cfil units.


" Typical " Circuit . . . . . as Excerpted from a PunySonic Application Note :


Pany_MIP2_Gxxx_Application_Note.jpg



VISUAL TUTORIAL

( On the testing of the 4 diode sections, internal of the units Full Wave Bridge Rectifier unit.)

The particular casing outline on the unit used in your system, is exhibiting a variant, in the respect
of the A.C. voltage coming up the board is connecting into side by side terminals on the bridge.
The rectified D.C. output voltage then shows up as side by side +and - terminals, just above.
With proper polarity foil connections routing over to the large black Cin main supply reservoir capacitor.



73's de Edd
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top