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Boosting transformer current output

remzy

Jun 12, 2015
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As you've already read from the thread title, i need a way to get more current on the transformer output. I need to run a 24V fan for a certain aplication. I've only managed to find one transformer from my junk pile which fits the bill, but it has way too low current output. The voltage drops about 10v when i connect the fan to it. Is there a way to get more current from transformer output withouth sacrifising the voltage? The output of this transformer is about 32 volts after rectification. I'm using LM317 as a voltage regulator, but still the question is the same: is there a way to get more current on secondary coil?
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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Is there a way to get more current from transformer output withouth sacrifising the voltage?

Sure, get another transformer rated for the required current.
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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Yea I could do that but that would be the easy way out :D

Well, another method is to unwind the secondary, counting the number of windings,

then unwind the primary, counting the windings,

Now pick a larger size wire for each, capable of carrying the larger current (i.e. twice the cross sectional area for twice the current)

Now take a look at the core. You'll have to get a core which is also larger in proportion to the current.

Then rewind the primary with thicker wire,

And rewind the secondary with thicker wire.

Then you have simply and easily made the transformer capable of more current.

All joking aside, what is the rating of the transformer, and what current do you require to operate the fan. If the transformer is suitably rated, using a switchmode regulator to convert 32V to 24V will give you a little more current than using a linear regulator. However, if you are grossly overloading the transformer, nothing will help.
 

remzy

Jun 12, 2015
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Well, another method is to unwind the secondary, counting the number of windings,

then unwind the primary, counting the windings,

Now pick a larger size wire for each, capable of carrying the larger current (i.e. twice the cross sectional area for twice the current)

Now take a look at the core. You'll have to get a core which is also larger in proportion to the current.

Then rewind the primary with thicker wire,

And rewind the secondary with thicker wire.

Then you have simply and easily made the transformer capable of more current.

All joking aside, what is the rating of the transformer, and what current do you require to operate the fan. If the transformer is suitably rated, using a switchmode regulator to convert 32V to 24V will give you a little more current than using a linear regulator. However, if you are grossly overloading the transformer, nothing will help.
Its a tiny fan. It uses about 200mA. Even when I connect the fan directly at 32 volts after the rectifier, the voltage drops to about 20V when the fan is on.
 

Minder

Apr 24, 2015
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You cannot exceed the Va rating of the transformer, regardless of winding gauge.
This is dependent largely on core size.
M.
 

duke37

Jan 9, 2011
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A transformer for double the current (power) will be about double the weight.
What is the LM317 for? A fan should work even on unsmoothed rectified AC.
 

(*steve*)

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I think we need to see the circuit. Something sounds fishy
 

remzy

Jun 12, 2015
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A transformer for double the current (power) will be about double the weight.
What is the LM317 for? A fan should work even on unsmoothed rectified AC.
So that I can adjust the speed of it
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
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If you can't supply the specs of the transformer, at least tell use how large it is. A pic with a ruler would be good.

Bob
 

(*steve*)

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Or problems may be due to how you rectify and filter the AC.

These questions are answered by a good schematic.

If you don't want to help us by answering our questions, then I'll go back to my first answer, get a bigger transformer.

Don't tell anyone I said so, but I might even go so far as to suggest you get yourself a thronomister because it's the only way I know to boost current without affecting voltage.
 
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