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British Line and Netural Conventions?

M

Mike Monett

Jan 1, 1970
0
[...]
Not sure what Mike was on about. 'Connectors' is the subject, n'est-ce
pas?
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

You started a new thread when you mentioned English Females. The part that
was confusing was the reference to electricity, but I guess romantic people
have many ways to describe these things:)

Regards,

Mike Monett
 
E

Eeyore

Jan 1, 1970
0
Richard said:
No, actually, the problem at the source is breeders who don't bother to
house-train their screaming poop machines.

You obviously haven't had kids. They have a habit of doing exactly what you tell them not
to do. It's called experimentation.

Graham
 
C

Chris Jones

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael said:
Big deal. Have you ever worked on a 195 KW TV transmitter, 14 KV
power lines, or even 480 three phase?

No, 3 phase is 415V here and I have not had a phase-to-phase shock from it.
And from your continued presence, I guess that you have never had a shock
from those 14kV power lines that you mention. If you can remember back, I
was just pointing out that one likely reason that you guys don't see the
point in sleeved pin power plugs is that 120V doesn't really hurt that much
on your finger, but you might appreciate the importance more when your
finger slips across the pins of a 240V plug.

Chris
 
K

krw

Jan 1, 1970
0
You obviously haven't had kids. They have a habit of doing exactly what you tell them not
to do. It's called experimentation.

You've obviously never trained your rug-rats to be human.
 
M

Michael A. Terrell

Jan 1, 1970
0
Chris said:
No, 3 phase is 415V here and I have not had a phase-to-phase shock from it.
And from your continued presence, I guess that you have never had a shock
from those 14kV power lines that you mention. If you can remember back, I
was just pointing out that one likely reason that you guys don't see the
point in sleeved pin power plugs is that 120V doesn't really hurt that much
on your finger, but you might appreciate the importance more when your
finger slips across the pins of a 240V plug.


120 VAC can kill just as well as 240 if the resulting current flows
through your heart, and we do have a lot of 240 VAC circuits.

The 480 VAC is per phase. Three phase is available at a lot of
different voltages. 480 VAC three phase is very common on large motors.
I have been shocked by 480 VAC powered equipment with bad insulation and
an open safety ground. I was lucky. A lot of others have died in
similar situations.

I have been close enough to the 14 KV lines to have the hair on my
arms stand up. Any closer and I would have been dead.

--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida
 
M

Malcolm Moore

Jan 1, 1970
0
That's pretty much how I learned, but it was only my thumb between the
prongs.


No, actually, the problem at the source is breeders who don't bother to
house-train their screaming poop machines.


No, we're Free. Most of us don't believe in cradle-to-grave "security".

If you were really Free you would be allowed to install sockets that
didn't hide live parts behind an insulating plate. i.e. the contacts
and terminations and wiring (uninsulated of course) would be easily
touched. That would give breeders a good opportunity to display their
skills.
 
S

Spehro Pefhany

Jan 1, 1970
0
[...]
Not sure what Mike was on about. 'Connectors' is the subject, n'est-ce
pas?
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

You started a new thread when you mentioned English Females. The part that
was confusing was the reference to electricity, but I guess romantic people
have many ways to describe these things:)

Regards,

Mike Monett

You guys. I'm glad I didn't get into hermaphrodite types.

What do you call a connector that has an external (insulated) pin but
with a socket inside the pin? It would mate with a recessed pin
surrounded by plastic with an oversized hole. I'd call the first part
female, because the electrical part is made that way, but I'm not sure
all would agree. Not hermaphrodite (I'd reserve that term for
constructions such as tuning fork style contacts that engage at right
angles).


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
 
M

Michael A. Terrell

Jan 1, 1970
0
Spehro said:
[...]
Some of which applies to their females as well, electrically
speaking, of course.

Pardon ?

Graham

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_1363

1/4" x 5/32"! Talk about yer massive prongs...

LOL !

I was perplexed about the reference to women though.

Graham
Not sure what Mike was on about. 'Connectors' is the subject, n'est-ce
pas?
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

You started a new thread when you mentioned English Females. The part that
was confusing was the reference to electricity, but I guess romantic people
have many ways to describe these things:)

Regards,

Mike Monett

You guys. I'm glad I didn't get into hermaphrodite types.

What do you call a connector that has an external (insulated) pin but
with a socket inside the pin? It would mate with a recessed pin
surrounded by plastic with an oversized hole. I'd call the first part
female, because the electrical part is made that way, but I'm not sure
all would agree. Not hermaphrodite (I'd reserve that term for
constructions such as tuning fork style contacts that engage at right
angles).


Don't forget GR connectors. :)


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
Spehro said:
[...]

Some of which applies to their females as well, electrically
speaking, of course.

Pardon ?

Graham

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_1363

1/4" x 5/32"! Talk about yer massive prongs...

LOL !

I was perplexed about the reference to women though.

Graham

Not sure what Mike was on about. 'Connectors' is the subject, n'est-ce
pas?

Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

You started a new thread when you mentioned English Females. The part that
was confusing was the reference to electricity, but I guess romantic people
have many ways to describe these things:)

Regards,

Mike Monett

You guys. I'm glad I didn't get into hermaphrodite types.

What do you call a connector that has an external (insulated) pin but
with a socket inside the pin? It would mate with a recessed pin
surrounded by plastic with an oversized hole. I'd call the first part
female, because the electrical part is made that way, but I'm not sure
all would agree. Not hermaphrodite (I'd reserve that term for
constructions such as tuning fork style contacts that engage at right
angles).


Don't forget GR connectors. :)

Yeah, 874's, which would (unnaturally) mate with a male banana in an
emergency. The 9000's never caught on, probably because of their cost
and their size, which led to moding issues.

APCs are still used, and are sexless. They're useful because the
mating plane is exactly defined and they can mate many, many times
without damage (randy buggers that they are.)

Pity the poor SMB; the plug is female, and the jack is male.

John
 
K

krw

Jan 1, 1970
0
[...]
Some of which applies to their females as well, electrically
speaking, of course.

Pardon ?

Graham

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_1363

1/4" x 5/32"! Talk about yer massive prongs...

LOL !

I was perplexed about the reference to women though.

Graham
Not sure what Mike was on about. 'Connectors' is the subject, n'est-ce
pas?
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

You started a new thread when you mentioned English Females. The part that
was confusing was the reference to electricity, but I guess romantic people
have many ways to describe these things:)

Regards,

Mike Monett

You guys. I'm glad I didn't get into hermaphrodite types.

What do you call a connector that has an external (insulated) pin but
with a socket inside the pin?
Female.

It would mate with a recessed pin
surrounded by plastic with an oversized hole. I'd call the first part
female, because the electrical part is made that way, but I'm not sure
all would agree. Not hermaphrodite (I'd reserve that term for
constructions such as tuning fork style contacts that engage at right
angles).

The part closest to the center defines the sex of a connector.
 
M

Michael A. Terrell

Jan 1, 1970
0
John said:
Yeah, 874's, which would (unnaturally) mate with a male banana in an
emergency. The 9000's never caught on, probably because of their cost
and their size, which led to moding issues.


I have a few cables with GR 874 connectors.

APCs are still used, and are sexless. They're useful because the
mating plane is exactly defined and they can mate many, many times
without damage (randy buggers that they are.)


I've never used any APC, but the concept is nice in that you don't
need piles of adapters on the bench for testing equipment.

Pity the poor SMB; the plug is female, and the jack is male.


I've used plenty of SMA, SMB, SMC and several other families of
subminiature coaxial connectors that I can't remeber at the moment. I'm
still recovering from oral surgery and a long term low level infection
and can remeber some things at the moment.

Have you ever used any "HN" connectors? There were some in a 1952
model RCA TV transmitter I moved and rebuilt.


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida
 
R

Robert Latest

Jan 1, 1970
0
John said:
Not many people die of electrocution, fewer still from 120, and I'd
guess approximately none from contacting partially-inserted plugs.

I think the biggest hazard in household electrics is not electrocution but
fire, and that risk actually increases in lower-voltage circuits (given that
appliances have similar power consumption everywhere). And plugs that don't
fit well or are only partially inserted may have periliously high contact
resistance.

But we need statistics to tell.

robert
 
E

Eeyore

Jan 1, 1970
0
Robert said:
I think the biggest hazard in household electrics is not electrocution but
fire, and that risk actually increases in lower-voltage circuits (given that
appliances have similar power consumption everywhere). And plugs that don't
fit well or are only partially inserted may have periliously high contact
resistance.

But we need statistics to tell.

I've heard that the greatest risk to humans from domestic electrical equipment
in the UK is standing on upturned plugs. It hurts.

Graham
 
J

John Fields

Jan 1, 1970
0
I've heard that the greatest risk to humans from domestic electrical equipment
in the UK is standing on upturned plugs. It hurts.
 
K

krw

Jan 1, 1970
0
I've heard that the greatest risk to humans from domestic electrical equipment
in the UK is standing on upturned plugs. It hurts.

Do you often step, barefoot, on rakes in the yard too?
 
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