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Brother MFC dead after power cycle?

N

Nobody

Jan 1, 1970
0
Should be possible. But there are some things I plain don't understand
why they were done that way, for example not allowing users to write to
CAD library directories. It is absolutely essential to be able to do that.

You're thinking of single-user PCs; Unix was designed for multi-user
systems.

You don't want one hung-over student to trash the library directory which
everyone uses.

It's like UAC in Vista, except Vista is torn between:

a) making software do it right (anything which a user modifies goes in the
user's "Documents and Settings" directory so it doesn't affect anyone
else), and
b) having to support the way it used to be done (programs using their
"Program Files" directory because they've already figured out where that
is and can't be bothered dealing with another directory).

So they compromised on trying to make case b) just annoying enough that
such programs would be at a disadvantage to their competition.

In Unix, the right way is the way it has always been done (assuming
that normal users can write anywhere outside of their home directory has
always been a losing proposition).

Programs normally locate data files using a sequence of directories,
including a per-user directory and a system-wide directory.

For a single-user system, you can make the relevant directories
group-writable for the appropriate group. This sometimes works for a
multi-user system where you can rely upon users not to shoot each other in
the foot, but you need to be careful about concurrency issues (i.e.
multiple users modifying a file or directory at the same time).
 
E

ehsjr

Jan 1, 1970
0
Jim said:
Which cheapy hp model has no power _switch_ ?:)

I had an hp 6L... lasted from 1994 until around 2 years ago. Worked
fine until I finally wore out the feed mechanism.

Now I have a P2015dn (two-sided). Only problem I have is, if unused
for a few days, it disappears from the network, and I have to re-find
it ;-)

...Jim Thompson

Call tech support. They'll have you screw around with it for
a while, then tell you to reinstall windows. :-(

Ed
 
N

Nobody

Jan 1, 1970
0
The problem is that the typical engineer spends enough time functioning in
"administrator" mode that it becomes highly annoying when they can't access
/usr/bin or /etc *on their own PCs*. I guess the traditional *nix solution
was the "Wheel" group, right? ...accounts that could read and write pretty
much anywhere, but didn't have "ultimate" (root) power over the system.

If you can write to /usr/bin or /etc, you can get root whenever you want
it.

A better solution is to just have one root shell lying around (preferably
on a virtual console rather than in an xterm).
Well, Windows programs are supposed to use HKEY_CURRENT_USER and then
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, right?

Right, but there doesn't seem to be the same kind of setup for directories.
Kinda funny how Gnome has a registry (modified with gconf-editor) when
so many people in the *nix world bash Windows', isn't it? :)

Dunno; I don't use Gnome. FWIW, I don't think there's anything
fundamentally wrong with Windows' registry model, although it's annoying
that regedit is so minimal.
 
G

Greegor

Jan 1, 1970
0
If you read text at that link it reports the printer drivers generate
errors!
 
N

Nobody

Jan 1, 1970
0
Hmm... why is that? Because xterms could be exploited through the clipboard
and copy/paste, or something else?

The clipboard is one option, XSendEvent() is another, plus a bunch of
extensions such as XTest which tend to get added faster than people
come to understand the security implications.

[There's a menu option to disallow events generated by XSendEvent(), but
that can be turned off programmatically via the EditRes protocol.]

It isn't necessarily malice that's the problem; if you get into the
habit of leaving a root xterm open all the time, eventually you'll
paste something into it by accident.
"My Documents" has been around since Windows 95, and most well-known
contemporary software makes use of it. Granted, there's a lot of legacy
stuff out there...

It's not so much about "My Documents" but the "Application Data" and
"Local Settings" folders. Those have been around for long enough too, at
least on NT.

The issue even manifests on relatively new software. It seems to be a case
of programmers who started with DOS and/or Win3.1/95/98/ME, and although
having since updated to newer APIs, haven't updated their mindset.
 
J

JosephKK

Jan 1, 1970
0
Have you looked for a Reset button, Joerg? ISTR my circa 1993 IBM Thinkpad has one buried inside,
on the mainboard and in a place that's accessable only to someone who *really* wants to get at it.
As you know, electronics that isn't really off when it's powered down can get confused. For this
reason I try to avoid owning stuff that has a momentary power switch... like the current &^@%$!!
computers.

Oh yeah. I have a laptop where to really power it down, i remove the
brick to computer connector, then flip the cover and pop the battery
out. I have to do this in groups of about 3 to 5 times if certain
critical settings get munged. All my normal PC's have real power
switches, cause i assemble them myself.
 
S

Spehro Pefhany

Jan 1, 1970
0
If you were in Phoenix I could direct you to a real repair guy. I
have stood in his garage where, in a matter of minutes, he
disassembles the printer, does a phenomenally good cleaning job,
replaces worn rollers, etc., and I'm right back to it... for $30 plus
parts.

...Jim Thompson

It's still under warranty (still on the original cartridge, in fact--
or perhaps not, since they've *lost* it and whatever sense of customer
service they may have ever had). I'm sick of being given the
run-around by their subcontinental army of call center droids. Should
I hire my own 'assistants' to make things happen? What would be the
most effective and fun approach? I figure a concerted effort of, say,
30 or 40 hours could be quite useful.

PS I'll be in Phoenix for about an hour later today. I'll wave or
something...
 
K

krw

Jan 1, 1970
0
Oh yeah. I have a laptop where to really power it down, i remove the
brick to computer connector, then flip the cover and pop the battery
out. I have to do this in groups of about 3 to 5 times if certain
critical settings get munged.

My laptop needs to be powered down like that occasionally. It
loses contact with my docking station and won't boot either with or
without unless the battery is removed.
All my normal PC's have real power
switches, cause i assemble them myself.

How do you have a "real" power switch on an ATX board? Do you have
a "real" power switch on your TV too?
 
S

Spehro Pefhany

Jan 1, 1970
0
On Thu, 19 Feb 2009 03:54:55 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
[snip]
PS I'll be in Phoenix for about an hour later today. I'll wave or
something...

I'll watch or it ;-)
^^---------- should be "for"

Looks like this keyboard needs replacing ;-)

...Jim Thompson

Hey, free WiFi at Sky Harbor-- (surprisingly) civilized. ;-)

<wave>
 
J

JosephKK

Jan 1, 1970
0
My laptop needs to be powered down like that occasionally. It
loses contact with my docking station and won't boot either with or
without unless the battery is removed.


How do you have a "real" power switch on an ATX board? Do you have
a "real" power switch on your TV too?
It is a real one on the PSU case, and i open the PSU to see to it that
it is real. The TV and the Stereo both have standby switches (IR
remotes).
 
K

krw

Jan 1, 1970
0
It is a real one on the PSU case, and i open the PSU to see to it that
it is real.

Ah, some (most?) PSUs don't even have that. Do you actually use it?
The TV and the Stereo both have standby switches (IR
remotes).

Damned little has real power switches anymore.
 
J

Joerg

Jan 1, 1970
0
Joerg said:
Hello Folks,

Since this machine is widely used maybe one of you had this happen:
Moved it to the shiny new office, turned it on, nada, zilch. Only a
backlit blank LCD. Power cycling, pressing and holding buttons and such
produces no reaction.

Any ideas how to fix/reset the thang? Or does this mean it's dead? It is
a Brother MFC-7820N but I think they are all similar.

Jim will say I should have bought a HP. But, my HP needs 3-4 power
cycles per week while the Brother only needed one a month. For today's
design standards in consumer gear that's probably "good".

Just want to report that it repaired itself, after lots of power cycling
that I had to do to move probes around. Weird, really weird. Now if I
knew where the uC reset is I could probably fix it for good. But all it
says on the uC is "Concordia LJ9899001", no logo, totally unknown brand.
Shows up on some Asian sites but without any useful information.
 
J

JosephKK

Jan 1, 1970
0
Ah, some (most?) PSUs don't even have that. Do you actually use it?

It is a selection criteria. Yes, to take a unit fully out of service
for whatever reason, usually HW upgrades.
Damned little has real power switches anymore.
Yup.
 
J

Joerg

Jan 1, 1970
0
Jim said:
The printer was only temporarily Californicated ?:)

Come to think of it, hmm, it began to work just after the budget was
passed. A tax increase :-(

But it's dark gray, not blue.
 
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