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Can I split an 8 AA battery holder into 2 packs that still generate 12volts?

Doc_K

Feb 3, 2015
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Hey guys! I'm building a project that needs to conserve space and do so by spreading things out. I have a Plastic 8 AA battery holder that converts power into 12 volts. I'm trying to see if there is any way that I can take it and convert it to two 4x AA battery holders but still generate a 12 volt current. Does anyone know where I should start with this? I hope this isn't a stupid question. I'm new to the electronics world, but hoping to learn everything I can. Thank you for the assistance.

Here's what I'm dealing with:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00H8WJ1SA?keywords=8 aa 12 volt&qid=1445583590&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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but still generate a 12 volt current
12 V is voltage, not current. Current s measured in A(mperes).

is any way that I can take it and convert it to two 4x AA battery holders
Yes, use a saw.

but still generate a 12 volt
No.
8*1.5 V = 12V, how would you be able to make 4*1.5 V = 12 V ?:confused: 4*1.5 V = 6 V, not more, presumably less with aging of the batteries.

Yul need two packs if you want to have 2*12 V.
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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Hi Doc,
Yes, you can easily use two sets of battery holders. Or any combination.
The link you provided have a 'type' of battery holder with a switch. Probably not ideal, because you need two.
Anyway, the basic explanation is all the batteries are series connected. That means the + from one battery goes to - of the other, then + and then - all the way round until you are left with the first - and the the last batteries + terminals of the first battery holder. Then continue. The last + from 'holder 1' goes to - of the second 'holder'. And so on. You will be left with the - from box 1 and the + from box2. That is your 12v.
Use these instead..Here

Martin
 

Doc_K

Feb 3, 2015
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Hi Doc,
Yes, you can easily use two sets of battery holders. Or any combination.
The link you provided have a 'type' of battery holder with a switch. Probably not ideal, because you need two.
Anyway, the basic explanation is all the batteries are series connected. That means the + from one battery goes to - of the other, then + and then - all the way round until you are left with the first - and the the last batteries + terminals of the first battery holder. Then continue. The last + from 'holder 1' goes to - of the second 'holder'. And so on. You will be left with the - from box 1 and the + from box2. That is your 12v.
Use these instead..Here

Martin


Awesome, thank you! So I'm drawing 12 volt Current from the other one.

With these I would wire it up like this and get the same amount of current? Thank you!

(-)-----(+)
[AA] [AA]
[AA] [AA]
[AA] [AA]
[AA] [AA]
(+) (-)
(+) (-)
Appliance
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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Erm.....Not sure I understand that. And as already stated by Harold, it's 12 volts not current!

If you have two battery holders, they have two connections or wires. A black negative and red positive wire. You can simply just join the first box red to second box black. Then you left with just one black and one red wire. But I wanted you to understand what you are doing.
So, they are all connected in 'series'.
- AA+ then - AA +......so -+ -+ -+ etc.

Martin
 

Harald Kapp

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So I'm drawing 12 volt Current from the other one.
It will help you and the others here when you get the difference between voltage (measured in Volts) and current (measured in Amperes) straight.
 

Alec_t

Jul 7, 2015
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You get to decide the supply voltage. The load driven by the supply draws whatever current it needs.
 
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