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dangerous battery voltage in a swimming pool

super

Nov 20, 2022
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Nov 20, 2022
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(English isnt my first language so im sorry in advance).
Hello,
As a part of a course im taking, my team and I are trying to make a device that will stand on the edge of the pool and throw a ball into it.
Im trying to understand the electrical hazards in the process and I cant find anything relating to the dangers of batteries near the pool.
im trying to understand what voltage might be dangerous to the swimmers (if they somehow touch it) or even if the device falls into the pool.
keep in mind we want it to run on batteries.
i'd love if anyone could give me an answer and even possibly direct me to any literature on the matter.
Thanks in advance!
 

super

Nov 20, 2022
2
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Nov 20, 2022
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what sort of batteries ? what voltage ?
I think we are aiming for 12V batteries but im trying to understand the limit so we know where we can go with it.
im not big in electricity so I dont really know yet..
 

ChosunOne

Jun 20, 2010
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I think when Davenn asked what kind of batteries, he meant are they lead-acid, lithium, NiCad, Carbon-Zinc, or one of the many other kinds. But if you're using a 12V battery, I don't know that it matters that much what kind it is. I recommend a SLA = Sealed Lead-Acid battery because SLAs are cheap compared to most other; and in your case, there's not need to pay more for a more compact or lighter battery; as well as Lead-Acid batteries are easily charged with common car care chargers.

There is no danger of electric shock from any 12 VDC battery (unless you stick your tongue directly across its terminals, but that stings even with a little 9V battery), and a sealed battery won't get the acid in the water---but even if it leaked, it wouldn't matter much because the amount of sulfuric acid in any SLA small enough to carry (such as car battery size) is too little to contaminate a swimming pool of water. By "contaminate", I mean it wouldn't make the water caustic or poisonous enough to be dangerous if it gets mixed in.
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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AC < 25 V or DC < 60 V are usually considered to be safe even when touched. In a wet environment possibly less.
Applicable standards are e.g. VDE 0100 (in Germany) or IEC 60364-4-41 (international).
 
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