Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Design / parameters of PTCs. Help with current limiting circuit.

esm.

Feb 19, 2012
26
Joined
Feb 19, 2012
Messages
26
Hi.
I have a PicKit3 MCU programmer from Microchip.
There is a PTC sensor close to the USB connector. Thats the PTC:
http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/MINISMDC050F-2/MINISMDC050FCT-ND/1045862

Datasheet:
http://documents.tycoelectronics.co...SCD25063HpdfEnglishENG_SS_SCD25063_H.pdf

Somebody could explain the meaning of each of these parameters below? These are the parameters of the PTC above:

- PTC resettable fuse
- Current - Hold (Ih) (max): 500mA
- Current - Trip (It): 1A
- Time to Trip: 0,15s
- Current - Max: 100A
- R mim/Max: 0.150 ~ 1000 Ohm


I would like to know how to calculate a PTC value (determine its parameters) to make a over-current protection device, in a way the PTC begins to increase its resistance considerably only when the current flowing through it reaches a determinated value (I want to choose this value, in mA).


For example, I have some GPS modules that have a pin dedicated to connect the antenna power supply (I am putting 4,5V at this pin in my tests, and the GPS supports up to 5V at this pin). This pin have a maximum consumption of 50mA (maximum peak current), according to the GPS datasheet.
I would like to design a over-current protection against short circuit between the antenna wires (one wire is GND and the other is 4.5VDC), the choosen electrical current limit is 80mA to 100mA, for example.

Is it possible to design a current limiting circuit with the parameters below just by using a PTC in series with the antenna supply pin?

1) If the electrical current flowing through the PTC is below 60mA, it has very low series resistance (There is a very low voltage drop over the PTC)

2) If the electrical current flowing through the PTC is above 80mA~100mA, it has considerably high series resistance and limits the electrical current to a safe value? (lower than 120mA, for example, or some value near to this).


| 4,5V power supply | ------> | PTC | ------> | Antena power supply pin of my GPS module |
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,505
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,505
I can't imagine why you'd need a current limiting circuit when connecting a known device. Surely you are confident that it's not suddenly going to go short circuit on you?

The reason these things are on USB ports is because people can (and frequently do) attach anything to them. You have no idea and you're protecting yourself from uncontrollable external actions.

To answer your question though, you need to look at the available PTCs and see if any are suitable. You can probably find datasheets which describe the properties of families of these products. They often give advice on how to choose the correct device.
 
Top