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Detecting phone taps??

G

gothika

Jan 1, 1970
0
I need to run a sweep on my phone lines to detect a tap.
What is available in the retail market these days for doing that?
Or is it possible to build something homebrew, say something like a
wheatstone bridge for measuring field resistances?(Know that's how it
was done years ago.)
The tap is going to be a physical one somewhere on the residential
side of the line as I've had the phone company out to check
connections and everything is clean on the feedin side.
The patch in is going to be somewhere in the walls or under the house.
Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 
W

Watson A.Name - 'Watt Sun'

Jan 1, 1970
0
I need to run a sweep on my phone lines to detect a tap.
What is available in the retail market these days for doing that?
Or is it possible to build something homebrew, say something like a
wheatstone bridge for measuring field resistances?(Know that's how it
was done years ago.)
The tap is going to be a physical one somewhere on the residential
side of the line as I've had the phone company out to check
connections and everything is clean on the feedin side.
The patch in is going to be somewhere in the walls or under the house.
Any info would be greatly appreciated.

You can't really tell if there's a tap on the line, most such
equipment is high impedance and can't be detected. You might find out
something if you disconnect the line at the demarc where the inside
wiring connects to the telco wiring. Then disconnect all your phones,
etc. Then put a high voltage, maybe with something like a megohmmeter
on the line, like maybe 500V. If there's anything on it, it will
definitely show up. Probably won't be working afterwards, either.

You might find more info on the ng comp.dcom.telecom.tech.


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###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
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My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
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G

gothika

Jan 1, 1970
0
That's what I had in mind.
The phone company use to use wheatstone bridges to test line loads.
They could tell precisely how many phones were on a circuit.
They quit that when they could no longer monopolize the home phone
market.
I had the idea of disconnecting all my phones and the line at the
junction box and feeding a "bit" of voltage through to fry his gear.
(This would work with old phones prior to electronic touch tone
models. A loud ring and smoke then dead phone.)
There's equipment for checking phone lines, just most too expensive
and often unavailable to the common joe.
An infinity transmitter would do the trick. Just disconnect all phones
in the house and activate the IT. I could then listen to his
conversations.
 
W

Watson A.Name - 'Watt Sun'

Jan 1, 1970
0
That's what I had in mind.
The phone company use to use wheatstone bridges to test line loads.

The wheatstone bridge is for resistance. They could test for line
length if the far end was shorted, and for poor insulation etc. It
didn't test for phones, which have almost infinite resistance when on
hook.
They could tell precisely how many phones were on a circuit.

Each phone had a ringer equivalence of 1.0. So they just measured the
impedance of the line to count the ringers. But that wasn't done with
a wheatstone bridge.
They quit that when they could no longer monopolize the home phone
market.

They didn't need to do it anymore because there was no need to, now
that anyone with a screwdriver could legally connect a phone they
bought at Radio Scrap.
I had the idea of disconnecting all my phones and the line at the
junction box and feeding a "bit" of voltage through to fry his gear.
(This would work with old phones prior to electronic touch tone
models. A loud ring and smoke then dead phone.)
There's equipment for checking phone lines, just most too expensive
and often unavailable to the common joe.
An infinity transmitter would do the trick. Just disconnect all phones
in the house and activate the IT. I could then listen to his
conversations.

You could just connect an amplifier to the line if you think someone
is using your line. Your original post did not sound like someone
else was tapping into and actually using your line, i.e. stealing
service from you. In that case, an easy way to prevent it would be to
put a short on the line whenever you're not using the phones. Then
the thief would just get a dead line. But that doesn't prevent
someone from listening when you are using the line. That's what I
thought you were talking about in the original post.


--
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
 
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