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Fire distinguisher schematic help - I'm serious

MikoKuch

Jan 15, 2015
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Jan 15, 2015
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Hello,

Recently my friend and I got the idea of making a fire distinguisher. Yes. A device that you point at something and an LED shines (or something else) to tell you if it's fire or not. We got the idea of using an IR sensor to detect the fire. The problem is, we don't know how to make the schematic and what components to use. We have built some things in the past like an EMP generator but off of pre-made schematics. Any help would be appreciated.
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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Welcome to electronicspoint.

Have a look at pyroelectric (PIR) sensors. They are usually used to detect motion from objects warmer than the surroundings. By reducing the sensitivity significantly, you may be able to use them as detectors for the heat emitted by a fire. Note that this kind of detector will react to any source of heat, not only fire. A hotplate, a stove etc. will emit infrared (heat) radiation, too.

If you want to detect only fire, you will probably have to resort to other means, e.g. a camera and some software that can detect the typical patterns of color, heat and smoke present in a fire.
 

Arouse1973

Adam
Dec 18, 2013
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Welcome to electronicspoint.

Have a look at pyroelectric (PIR) sensors. They are usually used to detect motion from objects warmer than the surroundings. By reducing the sensitivity significantly, you may be able to use them as detectors for the heat emitted by a fire. Note that this kind of detector will react to any source of heat, not only fire. A hotplate, a stove etc. will emit infrared (heat) radiation, too.

If you want to detect only fire, you will probably have to resort to other means, e.g. a camera and some software that can detect the typical patterns of color, heat and smoke present in a fire.

Good one Harald.
Also specialist thermopiles exist for this purpose tuned to the resonant frequency of CO2, between 4.2um -4.3um. Which is the wavelength that CO2 resonates at when burning hydrocarbons. You could also look at near IR devices and UV. Also flames flicker at a certain rate as oxygen is aspirated causing small explosions which cause the flicker of a flame.
Adam
 
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