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Gas Gauge Sending Unit question

Kiwi

Jan 28, 2013
424
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Jan 28, 2013
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424
These gauges don't require a regulated voltage supply.
They are called balancing coil gauges.
They have two small coils that pull the needle in opposite directions. One is connected to ground and the other to the sender.
As the voltage changes the magnetic pull of each coil changes, thus cancelling out any voltage variations.

Your gauge is calibrated for a 0 - 90ohm GM sender.

The fuel pump is for a 91-95 Jeep Wrangler, so probably not compatible with the GM spec gauge.
 

Johnkatgabe

Mar 21, 2022
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Mar 21, 2022
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16
Thanks everyone. I ordered a small device that goes inline that I can calibrate any gauge to any sender. I’m going to give up and do it that way
 

Kiwi

Jan 28, 2013
424
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Jan 28, 2013
Messages
424
Please report back and advise if the calibration device works out for you.
I would be interested to know where you got it from if it solves your problem.
Cheers.
 

Johnkatgabe

Mar 21, 2022
16
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Mar 21, 2022
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Kiwi, I received the module yesterday (I’ll attach a picture). I knew my tank was on “E”, so I installed and adjusted the needle to “E” fairly easily. Went to gas station and filled up, and fixed the full side of the gauge. I’m unsure how long it will last, or if it lies to me, but so far I think it’s going to work.
 

Johnkatgabe

Mar 21, 2022
16
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
16
Kiwi, I received the module yesterday (I’ll attach a picture). I knew my tank was on “E”, so I installed and adjusted the needle to “E” fairly easily. Went to gas station and filled up, and fixed the full side of the gauge. I’m unsure how long it will last, or if it lies to me, but so far I think it’s going to work.
 

Kiwi

Jan 28, 2013
424
Joined
Jan 28, 2013
Messages
424
Thanks.
That looks like an interesting device that I may have a need for in the future.
Hope it solves your problem.

One thing to remember with fuel gauges is that they usually show the depth of fuel in the tank, not the actual volume of fuel.
A good example is a round truck tank. The gauge drops from full to 3/4 quickly, 3/4 to 1/4 is fairly slow, and then quickly from 1/4 to empty.
 
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