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Guy Macon's adventures with ultrapure water

J

John Woodgate

Jan 1, 1970
0
I read in sci.electronics.design that Dieter Britz <[email protected]>
Eating the polypropylene?

That would get it carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. It's one strange life-
form if it doesn't need any nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur.
Have you tried in a glass, or quartz,
container?

Silicon-burgers! Yum!
My "academic grandfather", Prof. Breyer (of ac polarography fame)
once told me that he had seen stuff grow in a solution of HgCl2.

Obviously alien invaders .... from Mercury! (Assuming no-one had
sprinkled zinc powder into it!)
Life, as you say, will find a way.

It seems so.
 
G

Guy Macon

Jan 1, 1970
0
Dieter said:
Eating the polypropylene? Have you tried in a glass, or quartz,
container?

In my experience, the slime grows on stainless steel. and the
white filaments grow in the water contained in polypropylene.

Glass is unsuitable for holding ultrapure water. It dissolves
into the water. I have heard that Quartz is better, but I have
never seen it in actual use.
 
G

Guy Macon

Jan 1, 1970
0
WayneL said:
Over the past week the has been so excellent feedback(threads)
on my question of water conductivity.

Wouldn't it be easier for the reader if there was *one* such
thread rather than you starting a new one every few days?
In a few thread the value of 18.3MR (0.055uS) was mentioned,
forgive me for being pedantic but could somebody help by
quoting a reference that cites this figure (either in ohms,
mhos or Siemens)?

You still aren't specifying a temperature or a pressure.
s long as fail to do that you will be unable to make use
of any answer you get.

Also, it has been explained to you that for your stated
application ultrapure water would be a very poor choice and
would give you a different reading every time you ran the
experiment. Ultrapure water with no dissolved gasses is
one of the *least* likely things that you might find as a
contaminant of standard electrical equipment. Pick another
liquid. This is good advice. I strongly suggest that you
not ignore it.

That being said, here are your references. It would be a
Good Thing if you were to use them wisely:
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-ionization_of_water
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Ambient_Temperature_and_Pressure
 
W

WayneL

Jan 1, 1970
0
Hi

I am writting a paper and it is fround upon to include web address or usenet
ref. It need it to be a printed publication.


Wayne
 
D

Dieter Britz

Jan 1, 1970
0
WayneL said:
I am writting a paper and it is fround upon to include web address or usenet
ref. It need it to be a printed publication.

In giving you the Aylward & Finlay reference, I didn't mention that
it provides figures for a number of temperatures. It should be an
easily accessible book, even in your apparently church-mousy situation.

Good luck with the paper. When you write it, make sure you turn spell-
checking ON...
 
G

Guy Macon

Jan 1, 1970
0
WayneL said:
I am writting a paper and it is fround upon to include web
address or usenet ref. It need it to be a printed publication.

The fact that you are writing a paper and that papers require
references is irrelevant. The fact remains that the basic
assumption behind your paper (that ultrapure water with no
dissolved gasses is something that one is likely to find as
a contaminant of standard electrical equipment) is flawed.

I suggest that you write a paper analysing what happens when
boysenberry jam contaminates electrical equipment. That would
be far more likely, and the jam would stay jam long enough
for you to take a resistivity measurement.

You seem determined to ignore the above advice. Care to tell
us why?
 
W

WayneL

Jan 1, 1970
0
Guy Macon said:
The fact that you are writing a paper and that papers require
references is irrelevant. The fact remains that the basic
assumption behind your paper (that ultrapure water with no
dissolved gasses is something that one is likely to find as
a contaminant of standard electrical equipment) is flawed.

I suggest that you write a paper analysing what happens when
boysenberry jam contaminates electrical equipment. That would
be far more likely, and the jam would stay jam long enough
for you to take a resistivity measurement.

You seem determined to ignore the above advice. Care to tell
us why?

Vested interest.
Whilst I believe in the freedom of information the people who pay for my
research would like to be the first to know about it. Thus one should not
bite the hand that feed you.
I guess you may call it a balancing act.
I will share as much as I feel I can.
Thanks for you help.



Cheers

Wayne
 
G

Guy Macon

Jan 1, 1970
0
WayneL said:
Vested interest.
Whilst I believe in the freedom of information the people who
pay for my research would like to be the first to know about it.
Thus one should not bite the hand that feed you.
I guess you may call it a balancing act.
I will share as much as I feel I can.

Nonresponsive answer noted. I still have no idea why you seem
determined to ignore the above advice.

I call writing a paper about contaminants in electrical equipment
that assumes a contaminant (gas-free ultrapure water) that will
never, ever be found in any electrical equipment to be quite a
good example of biting the hand that feeds you. But, if you
insist on screwing your customer with a bad analysis, who am
I to stand in your way?

Followups set. I am not interested in further discussion.
 
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