Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Hello can somebody teach me how to connect am to arduino

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
Hello, can somebody teach me, what i need to connect an am receiver to arduino,
what do i need to do? thnx
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,889
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,889
Howsabout you tell us what YOU want to DO? Then someone here will determine how "to connect an am receiver to arduino" if that seems to be an appropriate solution to whatever it is you are trying to DO.
 

Harald Kapp

Moderator
Moderator
Nov 17, 2011
13,769
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
Messages
13,769
Specifically.
  • do you want to take the receiver's audio output and read it from the arduino?
  • do you want to control the tuner (station select) of the receiver from the arduino?
  • do you want to control the audio output of the receiver (volumen, bass, trebbel controls...)
  • which receiver do you want to use?
  • ...
We do not have glass balls to read your intention.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
Howsabout you tell us what YOU want to DO? Then someone here will determine how "to connect an am receiver to arduino" if that seems to be an appropriate solution to whatever it is you are trying to DO.

Specifically.
  • do you want to take the receiver's audio output and read it from the arduino?
  • do you want to control the tuner (station select) of the receiver from the arduino?
  • do you want to control the audio output of the receiver (volumen, bass, trebbel controls...)
  • which receiver do you want to use?
  • ...
We do not have glass balls to read your intention.
o sorry , yes i wil like to control the tuner(station select) of the receiver from arduino. can you help me please
 
Last edited by a moderator:

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,889
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,889
... i wil like to control the tuner(station select) of the receiver from arduino. can you help me please
We can help, but as @Harald Kapp said in post #3, most of us do not have crystal balls or the necessary psychic skills to divine your intent.

For starters, do you have a particular radio (manufacturer name and model) you want to tune with an arduino? Why do you think an arduino is suitable for the purpose of tuning a radio receiver? Do you have a project in mind, or is this just a "what if" investigation into the possibility of using an arduino to tune a radio receiver?

Some of us here don't mind working on "pie in the sky" problems, but others feel it is a waste of time if nothing concrete or practical is resolved. It's nice to know in advance which direction this thread is going to take before committing a lot of time to it.

For whatever reasons, many original posters feel it is unnecessary to provide in-depth information of what they are trying to DO. The result can be weeks of back and forth questions as we try to pry out sufficient details to provide a reasonable solution. Please don't be that kind of poster: tell us up front, in as much detail as possible, WTF you are trying to DO. A few electrons may be inconvenienced by whatever words appear on our screens, but no trees will be destroyed... And, if we don't care to read everything we see, there is a little key on our keyboard that will automagically delete it.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
We can help, but as @Harald Kapp said in post #3, most of us do not have crystal balls or the necessary psychic skills to divine your intent.

For starters, do you have a particular radio (manufacturer name and model) you want to tune with an arduino? Why do you think an arduino is suitable for the purpose of tuning a radio receiver? Do you have a project in mind, or is this just a "what if" investigation into the possibility of using an arduino to tune a radio receiver?

Some of us here don't mind working on "pie in the sky" problems, but others feel it is a waste of time if nothing concrete or practical is resolved. It's nice to know in advance which direction this thread is going to take before committing a lot of time to it.

For whatever reasons, many original posters feel it is unnecessary to provide in-depth information of what they are trying to DO. The result can be weeks of back and forth questions as we try to pry out sufficient details to provide a reasonable solution. Please don't be that kind of poster: tell us up front, in as much detail as possible, WTF you are trying to DO. A few electrons may be inconvenienced by whatever words appear on our screens, but no trees will be destroyed... And, if we don't care to read everything we see, there is a little key on our keyboard that will automagically delete it.
Hi, i know how to do it , i have enough examples in internet, when they are ready, just to programming, but i will like my am receiver to connect, i make self my am tuner
 

Harald Kapp

Moderator
Moderator
Nov 17, 2011
13,769
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
Messages
13,769
Hi, i know how to do it
What then is the question, I wonder?

i make self my am tuner
Then you will have to provide the means for controlling the frquency selectin in a digital way. How you do this depends largely on the way you build the tuner. Some off the shelf tuner modules come with a built-in digital tuning capability. Other types of tuner may need an analog control voltage etc.
Without us knowing (from you) how the frquency control of the tuner is done we can by no means support you how to achieve the necessary kind of control.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
What then is the question, I wonder?


Then you will have to provide the means for controlling the frquency selectin in a digital way. How you do this depends largely on the way you build the tuner. Some off the shelf tuner modules come with a built-in digital tuning capability. Other types of tuner may need an analog control voltage etc.
Without us knowing (from you) how the frquency control of the tuner is done we can by no means support you how to achieve the necessary kind of control.
Ah So i have to make digital way, thank you very much now i understand
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,889
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,889
Ah So i have to make digital way, thank you very much now i understand
I doubt that you understand enough. @Harald Kapp offered you two methods "for controlling the frequency in a digital way." The arduino is a digital computer, so its output will be derived from digital instructions, but that does NOT mean the output has to be digital.

Again, it depends on how your receiver is tuned. Let's say you got really ambitious and decided to build an AM tuner to cover the medium-wave broadcast bands as well as the shortwave broadcast bands, up to and including 40m transmissions. Let's also say you are smart enough to figure out how to do this without band-switching in a direct conversion fashion. Let's say you also figured out a a way to select the mixer oscillator frequency (thus tuning your radio) using digital means, maybe using a rotary encoder providing bi-directional pulses to increase or decrease your mixer oscillator frequency. Well... if you are smart enough to have done all that, then connecting an Arduino microprocessor is a "piece of cake".

But this is just speculation on my part. No one reading this forum knows what your self-made AM tuner looks like or how it is constructed, nor its principle of operation (there are many), nor how it is currently tuned, yada, yada, yada. WE KNOW NOTHING! You may know something, but seem unwilling or perhaps unable to share what you know by posting pictures and schematic diagrams. If that be the case, I will go participate in another thread. Good luck with your wiring and programming, @michael1978.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
this i take like example from internet, i need just to have basic idea, how to make digitalreceiver.png
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,889
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,889
You should have stated up front and immediately that this circuit was copied from this website. I hardly think it is worth the effort, but to interface this circuit to an Arduino you will need a digital-to-analog converter and one or more varactor diodes, such as this one, an SVC236-TB-E from ON Semiconductors and available from Mouser. You wire two or more of these varactor diodes in parallel and connect them in parallel across the tuning capacitor, VC1, in series with a largish-valued DC-blocking capacitor. You will then need to reverse-bias the varactor diodes with a separate, isolated, DC power source whose output voltage is controlled by the digital-to-analog converter connected to the Arduino. Easy-peasy, then just add some software... er, sorry, a sketch... as software is called in the Arduino world.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
You should have stated up front and immediately that this circuit was copied from this website. I hardly think it is worth the effort, but to interface this circuit to an Arduino you will need a digital-to-analog converter and one or more varactor diodes, such as this one, an SVC236-TB-E from ON Semiconductors and available from Mouser. You wire two or more of these varactor diodes in parallel and connect them in parallel across the tuning capacitor, VC1, in series with a largish-valued DC-blocking capacitor. You will then need to reverse-bias the varactor diodes with a separate, isolated, DC power source whose output voltage is controlled by the digital-to-analog converter connected to the Arduino. Easy-peasy, then just add some software... er, sorry, a sketch... as software is called in the Arduino world.
rely i just need these step and after to programming in arduino. i told that i take it
from internet this am receiver
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
You should have stated up front and immediately that this circuit was copied from this website. I hardly think it is worth the effort, but to interface this circuit to an Arduino you will need a digital-to-analog converter and one or more varactor diodes, such as this one, an SVC236-TB-E from ON Semiconductors and available from Mouser. You wire two or more of these varactor diodes in parallel and connect them in parallel across the tuning capacitor, VC1, in series with a largish-valued DC-blocking capacitor. You will then need to reverse-bias the varactor diodes with a separate, isolated, DC power source whose output voltage is controlled by the digital-to-analog converter connected to the Arduino. Easy-peasy, then just add some software... er, sorry, a sketch... as software is called in the Arduino world.
oo sorry one more time me, you mean to add to varactor extra dc power that output is digital to analog converter, ok, but how many varactor do i need to use 2 of 3 of more, and how much is for example the dc blocking capacitor size, and where to take output? sorry Mr that i ask you su much because is very important to me THANKS.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
You should have stated up front and immediately that this circuit was copied from this website. I hardly think it is worth the effort, but to interface this circuit to an Arduino you will need a digital-to-analog converter and one or more varactor diodes, such as this one, an SVC236-TB-E from ON Semiconductors and available from Mouser. You wire two or more of these varactor diodes in parallel and connect them in parallel across the tuning capacitor, VC1, in series with a largish-valued DC-blocking capacitor. You will then need to reverse-bias the varactor diodes with a separate, isolated, DC power source whose output voltage is controlled by the digital-to-analog converter connected to the Arduino. Easy-peasy, then just add some software... er, sorry, a sketch... as software is called in the Arduino world.
sorry can i send you my ltspice file, wich i maket that am receiver, maybe you can change self
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,510
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,510
You need sufficient varactors to provide the required capacitance, and provide a voltage swing sufficient to vary the capacitance through the required range.

You have basic idea.

Would you like us to build and test a prototype after we design it?
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
You need sufficient varactors to provide the required capacitance, and provide a voltage swing sufficient to vary the capacitance through the required range.

You have basic idea.

Would you like us to build and test a prototype after we design it?
yes if it is possible ;-)
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,889
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,889
yes if it is possible ;-)
Sure, almost anything is possible with sufficient time and the money to pursue it. How much of both are you willing to invest? This is not a teaching forum. It is a discussion forum.

sorry can i send you my ltspice file, wich i maket that am receiver, maybe you can change self
WTF would I want your LTSpice file? It's your project, not mine. And the LTSpice simulation for that circuit is readily available on the Internet at this link that I previously provided.

It has often been observed that God helps those who help themselves. That meme applies to posters seeking help here at Electronics Point. As a hobbyist forum, we help those who help themselves. You help yourself by learning how the circuit you copied from the Internet actually works, determining what its advantages and disadvantages are, determining whether it is even suitable for your needs.

After doing all of that, learn about varactor diodes and how they are used as variable capacitors. Understand why a DC blocking capacitor is needed to add varactor tuning diodes to your circuit, and what its value should be. But before that, learn some electrical theory, such as how the three basic passive components (resistors, capacitors, and inductors) work. Learn the math skills needed to perform circuit analysis. Learn how to apply Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws to analyze circuit behavior. Make Google your Best Friend as you search for answers. Take free online courses. Don't be satisfied with "monkey see, monkey do" solutions.

I am not going to provide you with a free "canned" solution, although there are other websites and forums that attempt to do that. If you are satisfied with such, try visiting them. Start with this one. If you want to be an electronics hobbyist, put some effort into learning electronics. We'll help if we see that you are trying to help yourself. Otherwise, it appears to me that you are just another "drive by" poster looking for quick answers. BTW, your English, spelling, and grammar are terrible. Put lots of effort into improving that first.
 

michael1978

Mar 17, 2012
388
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
388
Sure, almost anything is possible with sufficient time and the money to pursue it. How much of both are you willing to invest? This is not a teaching forum. It is a discussion forum.


WTF would I want your LTSpice file? It's your project, not mine. And the LTSpice simulation for that circuit is readily available on the Internet at this link that I previously provided.

It has often been observed that God helps those who help themselves. That meme applies to posters seeking help here at Electronics Point. As a hobbyist forum, we help those who help themselves. You help yourself by learning how the circuit you copied from the Internet actually works, determining what its advantages and disadvantages are, determining whether it is even suitable for your needs.

After doing all of that, learn about varactor diodes and how they are used as variable capacitors. Understand why a DC blocking capacitor is needed to add varactor tuning diodes to your circuit, and what its value should be. But before that, learn some electrical theory, such as how the three basic passive components (resistors, capacitors, and inductors) work. Learn the math skills needed to perform circuit analysis. Learn how to apply Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws to analyze circuit behavior. Make Google your Best Friend as you search for answers. Take free online courses. Don't be satisfied with "monkey see, monkey do" solutions.

I am not going to provide you with a free "canned" solution, although there are other websites and forums that attempt to do that. If you are satisfied with such, try visiting them. Start with this one. If you want to be an electronics hobbyist, put some effort into learning electronics. We'll help if we see that you are trying to help yourself. Otherwise, it appears to me that you are just another "drive by" poster looking for quick answers. BTW, your English, spelling, and grammar are terrible. Put lots of effort into improving that first.
Thank you this site is very good, ohhh i learn i forget, thanks for helping, i search al long to find radio receiver to connect in google, but i did not find, only with their module, and arduino with their modul i find easy...because i find a lot how to make receiver, BUT THIS WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL TO ME, TO CONNECT AM RECEIVER TO ARDUINO. i cant find nowhere, only arduino with their module(chip), wich is ver easy, but anyway thank you
 
Last edited:

Merlin3189

Aug 4, 2011
250
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
250
I think heavans has come up with the simple answer to your question. My further thoughts are:

Since everyone with an Arduino seems to play with a little stepper motor, have you thought about using a stepper motor to turn the tuning capacitor on the radio?

Starting with the idea that you will control the radio with an Arduino, why not look for a circuit which already uses a varying voltage to tune it? Admittedly, this is much more common for VHF radios, but you might find an existing design for a varactor tuned MW AM radio. Then all you would need to do is to generate the tuning voltage, which you might do with the built in DAC. The AM portion of this circuit maybe useful.

The reason varicaps are used at VHF and not so much at LF is the amount of capacitance you need. Your circuit shows a 500pF capacitor, but heavans' varicap only goes up to about 100pF I think. That's why you might have to use several in parallel.
Now you can reduce the size of the capacitor needed if you increase the inductance of the coil. So if you increased the turns from 50-60 to maybe 150, perhaps one of these varicaps would get you down to the frequencies you want. But you are likely to find that you still don't get the full MW range, because the ratio of maximum to minimum capacitance may be too small.

(Searching for a suitable circuit I found this varicap which goes up to 400pF and is designed for AM receivers. The BB112 also looks suitable. But I don't know if either is available.)
 
Top