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Hello, Newbie here. Power Question

LarryD98

Jan 11, 2016
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I am building a giant stereo. When I have everything hooked up and start playing music the lights dim. I am worried about my amplifiers getting damaged. Is there such a thing as a capacitor for 110 V. Thanks
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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Hi Larry,
Can you be more specific.
A giant stereo?
The lights dim?. Stereo lights or town lights?:)
What do you mean by 110V capacitor? There are many types.

Martin
 

Harald Kapp

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I guess you want to "buffer" the 110 V mains, right? A capacitor cannot be used to buffer AC (mains), only for DC.

If you want buffering to support peak demand of the amplifier, this needs to be done on the DC side of the amplifier's power supply. Plus you will have to add current limiting on the primary side to avoid the current peaks that make the lights dim.
The current limit in turn may cause distortions of the audio output when the buffer capacitor is depleted faster tahn it can be recharged from mains. This is a delicate balance between the different effects you see (and hear).

Buffering mains would not help anyway as the drain on the power is obviously so strong that you can see the lights dimming. I suggest you use a dedicated outlet for the amplifier, one that is directly connected to the central mains distribution in your house or appartment. That way the voltage drop alongthe mains wires will not influence the light on other wires.
If, however, the power requirements of the amplifier are such that the feed to your home is showing a noticeable voltage drop, there is no cure but a separtet feed to your home, or a less powerful amplifier.
 

AnalogKid

Jun 10, 2015
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There is no direct relationship between a very large amplifier, or a very large and horribly inefficient amplifier, and a stereo system that does not sound like crap. Which is your ultimate goal?

ak
 

LarryD98

Jan 11, 2016
19
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Jan 11, 2016
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Hi Larry,
Can you be more specific.
A giant stereo?
The lights dim?. Stereo lights or town lights?:)
What do you mean by 110V capacitor? There are many types.

Martin
SORRY THIS WAS MEANT FOR MASLOW/ That would be town lights! I will post back.
Hello Maslow, I have this posted on another site, I want you to know I am as green as they come!

Good Morning, Yesterday I took the time to try and learn the basics. I now know how a transistor works basically , and how to test them, along with diodes and capacitors. I have viewed the schematic's over and over. I am getting a foot hold on things but still have a long way to go. So here is where I am at with the amp. I have checked and double checked all the output transistors. They appear to be good. Please correct me if I am wrong, The bottom row of transistors in the amp are called drivers and ohm out differently ?. They seem to have little to no resistance, In other words open? I did the bulb test again, it started out bright and got dim. Right channel is showing 55.6 VOLTS. It would be nice to have a little help from this point. No burn marks on the board I can not see any loose connections. I am not sure what component's are responsible for keeping the dc current in check to the speakers outputs. My guess would be the components on the board. I will start checking the caps this morning. Any help would very much be appreciated . To be honest, this is a bit over my head. I am getting ready to throw in the towel. Thanks everyone for any help you can offer? Oh and I carefully took the caps out. Is it ok the short them across the terminals with screwdriver or should I get a 10 ohm resistor? Point of interest, the 5,900 mfd caps measure different is this normal?
I guess you want to "buffer" the 110 V mains, right? A capacitor cannot be used to buffer AC (mains), only for DC.

If you want buffering to support peak demand of the amplifier, this needs to be done on the DC side of the amplifier's power supply. Plus you will have to add current limiting on the primary side to avoid the current peaks that make the lights dim.
The current limit in turn may cause distortions of the audio output when the buffer capacitor is depleted faster tahn it can be recharged from mains. This is a delicate balance between the different effects you see (and hear).

Buffering mains would not help anyway as the drain on the power is obviously so strong that you can see the lights dimming. I suggest you use a dedicated outlet for the amplifier, one that is directly connected to the central mains distribution in your house or appartment. That way the voltage drop alongthe mains wires will not influence the light on other wires.
If, however, the power requirements of the amplifier are such that the feed to your home is showing a noticeable voltage drop, there is no cure but a separtet feed to your home, or a less powerful amplifier.

Wow Great answer! So a cap is pretty much a no go. I will run another line from the fuse box and use a different breaker Do you think that might help?. I am running 4 large amps all at or just above 2 ohms load. Ok, I forgot exactly what I posted but the system in total has 5,600 rms watts. I am running three subs four sets of big box speakers and three sets of smaller box speakers. All set up in believe it or not a 30 foot trailer! LOL!
 
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LarryD98

Jan 11, 2016
19
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Jan 11, 2016
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There is no direct relationship between a very large amplifier, or a very large and horribly inefficient amplifier, and a stereo system that does not sound like crap. Which is your ultimate goal?

ak
Just not to starve the amps. It ids not that the amps are inefficient, as a matter of fact check out the new Crown amps. Extremely efficient. Thanks for the reply
 

AnalogKid

Jun 10, 2015
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the system in total has 5,600 rms watts. I am running three subs four sets of big box speakers and three sets of smaller box speakers. All set up in believe it or not a 30 foot trailer!

Why?

That's a serious question. At these kinds of power levels, the nature of the application has a direct bearing on the possible answers. What kind of electric service is available to the trailer? Is it domestic 120/240, industrial 3-phase 208, or what?

ak
 

LarryD98

Jan 11, 2016
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Jan 11, 2016
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Hello ak, Domestic 120. I have a short run to the sub panel. I and currently running a second lead on a separate breaker. Super heavy gage wire. Hope it will help.
 
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