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help finding a micro controller

bobers

Jul 31, 2023
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so i had a micro controller pop and it blew out part of the numbers and i’m not sure where to find a new one so if anyone could help me find one i would really appreciate it. this is the best picture i could get it looks like it says NDP 133_kc T24_0
9EE8203C-C259-47B6-A96D-D534BCA49D48.jpeg
 

Harald Kapp

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Would you have the code to program a new microcontroller?
No code, no glory.

Anyhow, it is probably not a microcontroller but a step-down DC/DC converter (link to NDP1331KC).
 

bobers

Jul 31, 2023
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Would you have the code to program a new microcontroller?
No code, no glory.

Anyhow, it is probably not a microcontroller but a step-down DC/DC converter (link to NDP1331KC).
well i think that’s good then right if it isn’t a micro controller can i just plug and play a new one if i can unsolder the old one of course?
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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well i think that’s good then right if it isn’t a micro controller can i just plug and play a new one if i can unsolder the old one of course?
If nothing else faulty caused it to blow it's top in the first place............
You may also (more than likely) find it difficult and damaging to the pcb to unsolder without the proper tools.
Startout tip would be to flood the pins with a good flux and some 60/40 solder then remove with a good quality wick designed for the job, flux, flux and more flux.
 

bobers

Jul 31, 2023
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sounds great thank you so much also the dc/dc converter i can find has the same 1331kc but it says something different then t24-0 would that still work or would it not
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
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The T24-0 marking appears to be a date code. As long as the NDP1331KC part number is on your replacement component, it should work fine.

Along the lines of @Bluejets recommendation, consider also using an inexpensive re-work/vacuum de-soldering station, including a pin-point vacuum "solder sucker" to remove the solder from each of the surface-mount gull-wing pins. De-soldering braid works fine, but it is easy to over-heat the circuit board while using it. Looking at your image, this appears to be a muiltilayer circuit board. Be very careful not to overheat it while removing the defective component. After removing the defective component, clean the board with 90% isopropyl alcohol and a bristle "acid brush" to remove the flux residue. Do not use 70% "rubbing alcohol" because it contains too much water. Even better would be anhydrous isopropanol, but this is not generally available to the public, and the last time I purchased any it was sold in five-gallon cans... you will need less than a pint of alcohol and any decent drug store should have 90% in stock for use by patients who need it to swab their skin prior to, say, insulin injections.

When soldering the replacement component to the board, tack-solder diagonally opposite corners first then solder the remaining six leads. Then go back and re-solder the two leads you tacked into place. Try your best to avoid "cold" solder joints. An electronics-grade paste or liquid flux will help the solder to flow properly. This can be applied separately, or the flux can be part of the solder wire core. After soldering, clean the excess flux from the board as before with isopropyl alcohol. I like to "flood" repaired boards with alcohol after removing the flux residue: lay board horizontal, apply a generous amount of alcohol, scrub with the bristle acid brush if necessary, then tip the board up and allow the alcohol to drain off into a paper towel or rag. The 90% alcohol evaporates very fast, or you can use a heat-gun on its lowest temperature setting or just use un-heated air from the heat-gun to accelerate the drying process.

Using @Bluejets suggestion to apply an excess of solder prior to removing the defective component is also the method many use to re-solder, or to newly-solder, devices with a LOT of pins, say 20 or more pins on each side. You load up the part pins with a lot of solder, then drag the soldering tip across the pins, using a well-fluxed tip to drag the solder and suck up (by capillary attraction) the excess between pins. This requires some practice, but it avoids having to invest in a re-work soldering station. Your soldering iron should be about 40 watts or thereabouts. I prefer a temperature-controlled tip, but this isn't absolutely necessary... it's just a convenience.

I don't know what your qualifications are. If you are experienced with this type of re-work, please ignore this comment.
 

bobers

Jul 31, 2023
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The T24-0 marking appears to be a date code. As long as the NDP1331KC part number is on your replacement component, it should work fine.

Along the lines of @Bluejets recommendation, consider also using an inexpensive re-work/vacuum de-soldering station, including a pin-point vacuum "solder sucker" to remove the solder from each of the surface-mount gull-wing pins. De-soldering braid works fine, but it is easy to over-heat the circuit board while using it. Looking at your image, this appears to be a muiltilayer circuit board. Be very careful not to overheat it while removing the defective component. After removing the defective component, clean the board with 90% isopropyl alcohol and a bristle "acid brush" to remove the flux residue. Do not use 70% "rubbing alcohol" because it contains too much water. Even better would be anhydrous isopropanol, but this is not generally available to the public, and the last time I purchased any it was sold in five-gallon cans... you will need less than a pint of alcohol and any decent drug store should have 90% in stock for use by patients who need it to swab their skin prior to, say, insulin injections.

When soldering the replacement component to the board, tack-solder diagonally opposite corners first then solder the remaining six leads. Then go back and re-solder the two leads you tacked into place. Try your best to avoid "cold" solder joints. An electronics-grade paste or liquid flux will help the solder to flow properly. This can be applied separately, or the flux can be part of the solder wire core. After soldering, clean the excess flux from the board as before with isopropyl alcohol. I like to "flood" repaired boards with alcohol after removing the flux residue: lay board horizontal, apply a generous amount of alcohol, scrub with the bristle acid brush if necessary, then tip the board up and allow the alcohol to drain off into a paper towel or rag. The 90% alcohol evaporates very fast, or you can use a heat-gun on its lowest temperature setting or just use un-heated air from the heat-gun to accelerate the drying process.

Using @Bluejets suggestion to apply an excess of solder prior to removing the defective component is also the method many use to re-solder, or to newly-solder, devices with a LOT of pins, say 20 or more pins on each side. You load up the part pins with a lot of solder, then drag the soldering tip across the pins, using a well-fluxed tip to drag the solder and suck up (by capillary attraction) the excess between pins. This requires some practice, but it avoids having to invest in a re-work soldering station. Your soldering iron should be about 40 watts or thereabouts. I prefer a temperature-controlled tip, but this isn't absolutely necessary... it's just a convenience.

I don't know what your qualifications are. If you are experienced with this type of re-work, please ignore this comment.
that’s super helpful i have just about no experience with any sort of pcb electronics work mostly just rc cars and bigger things so all that helps a bunch thank you all so much ill see how that works. also i’ll practice a couple of times on a junk board before trying it on the projector.
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
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@bobers: I forgot to mention that you MUST use either 60% Sn/40% Pb tin/lead alloy or a eutectic 63% Sn/37% Pb tin/lead alloy. NEVER use 50/50, sometimes called "Plumber's Solder" for electronic use. If your solder has a flux core, make sure it is a non-corrosive flux specified for electronics use. I generally use Kester multi-core solder. Avoid "lead free" solder, which is required for electronics sold in Europe.
 
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