Maker Pro
Maker Pro

HELP! Issues with Lighter Heating Coil

Falcore42

Apr 24, 2023
3
Joined
Apr 24, 2023
Messages
3
Hi, I'm new to electronics and have been playing around with my breadboard for a few months. I've started to transition over to PCB but I keep running into an issue I can't seem to solve.

I have a 9 volt battery powering the circuit. I've connected an on/off switch and a push button as well. The issue i'm having is with the lighter coil i've added to the circuit. On the breadboard the amount of current running through the circuit seems to be fine and it can be sustained.

When I solder the connections to a PCB the coil seems to overheat and breaks. I tried adding resistors to the board and have played around with various resistors but it seems that any amount won't turn the coil on. I even tried to add a 1 ohm ceramic resistor to test and the resistor became increasingly hot. The size of the ceramic ohm resistor won't work for this project anyways as I need something more compact.

Can anyone help me solve this issue. I'm sure it's not complicated to those with a proper background. See image below of coil on breadboard if this helps at all.

20230621_222008.jpg
 

Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
4,905
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
4,905
Interesting project.
What’s the specifications of the lighter coil?.
I would have thought that these are very low current and high voltage, powered by a piezo igniter?.
Out of curiosity, try adding a series connected torch bulb to limit the current.
Also a schematic of the circuit would be helpful rather than a picture of the breadboard. I suspect the coil is drawing max current from the 9V battery.

Martin
 

Falcore42

Apr 24, 2023
3
Joined
Apr 24, 2023
Messages
3
Hi, I tried asking for the specifications for the lighter coil but haven't been able to get an answer from the sellers. What do you mean by torch bulb?

Falcore
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
6,865
Joined
Oct 5, 2014
Messages
6,865
Breadboards and "smoke alarm" batteries were never made for high current circuits.
Those thin as hookup wire either BTW....or tactile switches.........:oops:
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
1,810
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
1,810
What do you mean by torch bulb?
A 9-volt flashlight bulb.
. On the breadboard the amount of current running through the circuit seems to be fine and it can be sustained
What is the amount of current? You have a multimeter?
Take a current measurement.
When I solder the connections to a PCB the coil seems to overheat and breaks.
For pcbs and breadboards and coil leads Dupont pin connectors are useful. Those are the connectors on the ends of your jumper wires in the photo.
photo_1695078139447.png
 

Falcore42

Apr 24, 2023
3
Joined
Apr 24, 2023
Messages
3
Here is my schematic drawing. The program i'm using doesn't have the fan or tungsten coil lighter I'm using, so swap out the two light bulbs for those items. The tungsten coil is a replacement piece for e cigarettes and I've been told has a 9-11 W. I measured the current and it's 2 amps, 3 volts. When I solder this to a PCB board, the tungsten coil overheats and breaks, looks like too much current. I tried adding resistors but when I do the coil doesn't get any current through. The only resistor that works seems to be a 1 ohm but it's bulky and heats up.
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2024-02-23 at 3.06.41 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2024-02-23 at 3.06.41 PM.png
    52.2 KB · Views: 6

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
6,499
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
6,499
either your coil needs to be of the correct resistance to 'glow' without breaking or you need to control the current through it.

Adding resistance only means the power is dissipated in that resistance so is a waste of time (and energy).

Are you running the coil continuously? In an e-cig the coil only heats momentarily AND it has a lot of heat dissipated by the air flow (from suction) over it. The coil is also only heating for as long as someone is sucking on the cig.

Match the e-cig circumstances and your coil will probably be ok. If you want to do something DIFFERENT you need a different approach.
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
1,810
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
1,810
the tungsten coil overheats and breaks, looks like too much current
Power in Watts equals voltage times current in amps.
3 volts * 2 amps equals 6 Watts
Of power. Something's wrong?
1708760367735.png
Heating elements in commercially available e-cigarettes, vape pens are usually made of stainless steel, nickel-chromium or nichrome, Kanthal nickel, or titanium. You're using tungsten? Anyway you say you have to add a one ohm resistor; one thing all these alloys have in common is a resistance depending on length,
diameter, cross-sectional area, of the wire. therefore...you added a 1 ohm resistor then you need a longer piece of tungsten wire to equal one ohm of resistance. What length of wire ?
See below . Have fun!
 
Top