Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Help with an ultrasonic rangefinder for blind people

Shreyas Kannan

Apr 17, 2016
3
Joined
Apr 17, 2016
Messages
3
So, i'm planning to make a device which uses sonar to detect knee-high obstacles when walking. If an obstacle is detected, a voice command is sent to the user so that they can avoid the obstacle (or i may use beeps). I have read many electronics books and am well versed in the electronic components but i just don't know how to do this project. I know i need a raspberry pi and an ultrasonic rangefinder but that's about it. I don't know what do, how to connect the stuff and how to write a program. I have searched online for a clear explanation of how to assemble electronics but there is nothing. I seriously need help!
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,510
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,510
there are plenty of examples of arduino projects using the common ultrasonic rangefinder modules. You'd probably be best off mounting the device at knee height (on a knee?) and consider haptic feedback.
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
7,682
Why do you think you need a Raspberry Pi? Are other microntrollers or embedded computers not capable of doing this? In fact, it can be done even without a microcontroller, though I would use one myself.

Bob
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
4,886
Joined
Jun 21, 2012
Messages
4,886
You might want to visit this Google page to see how others have approached this problem. The simplest solution is the red-painted "stick" that the blind often use to detect obstacles by swinging the rod back and forth in short arcs in a horizontal plane. No batteries required.

But if you really want something more useful than a stick, a high-tech solution is a CCD camera whose pixels modulate a vibrating pin array attached to the blind person's back. Take a look at this Google page for some ideas.

Some blind people carry a mechanical "clicker" which they use to create a short pulse of sound that their highly trained ears use to locate obstacles. Others simply make clicking noises with their teeth and tongue. And some even use ambient sounds for echo location. My wife tells me of a young blind man who plays basketball by using echo location from the dribbled ball!
 
Last edited:
Top