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How to break a faulty wireless keyboard and mouse.

xkubr

Jul 27, 2013
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Jul 27, 2013
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I bought a wireless keyboard and mouse from a local retailer. After 2 months the mouse is becoming unresponsive and the keyboard misses keystrokes. Also the battery life is about 3 days. Basically the product is useless to me as it is just to frustrating to use. There is a 6 months return policy, so when I returned the unit to the retailer they said they needed to send it in for “testing”. A few days later they called to tell me there is no fault and the unit is functioning as advertised, and my expectation of how the unit should function is irrelevant. So what I want to know is how do I “break” it properly so the retailer is forced to give me my refund. Obviously there can be no sign of abuse (smashed to pieces, water damage, etc.), even though smashing the unit would give me great pleasure, getting my money back is what I really want. The unit takes 2 AAA 1.2volt batteries.
 

Sadlercomfort

Ash
Feb 9, 2013
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Hi,

I'm not sure which country you live in but in the UK, if a company refuses to repair or replace you item, you can report it to your local Trading Standards Department because they're breaching your 'statutory rights'.

If you phone the retailer and tell them your going to do this, it might persuade them to refund or replace your mouse and save you calling trading standards. You have the right to a replacement or refund.. even if you don't think it's satisfactory quality.


Oh, I think these consumer rights apply to European countrys not just UK. So I'd try this again before making your mouse break on purpose.
 

KrisBlueNZ

Sadly passed away in 2015
Nov 28, 2011
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I don't recommend that you try to break it.

Find out what your consumer rights are. What country are you in?

Has the retailer admitted that the battery life is only three days and that the keyboard misses keystrokes?

Here in New Zealand we have the Fair Trading Act which says that products must be fit for the purpose for which they were sold. A keyboard or mouse that only lasts three days on one set of batteries, or misses keystrokes, would not fit this definition.
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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Jan 21, 2010
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Consumer protection laws differ around the world.

If one were. say, in South Africa, ones rights would be summarized here.

If one were in Zambia, the situation is covered here.

And that's just to Pick 2 places, one A, one Z... completely at random.
 

xkubr

Jul 27, 2013
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Jul 27, 2013
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That is an astoundingly accurate random guess... ;-) I live in South Africa and yes, as pointed out by steve, we do have a consumer protection body and legislation. However it is a bureaucratic nightmare to lodge a complaint, let alone get a finding in your favour. I am simply trying to find the most expedient way to resolve the problem.
 

xkubr

Jul 27, 2013
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Jul 27, 2013
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Hooking up a 9volt battery with reversed polarity for a couple of minutes did the trick.
 

KrisBlueNZ

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You have now invalidated your warranty and thrown away your moral advantage. Your retailer would be within their rights to refuse responsibility for fixing your deliberate damage. Whether they can show how the damage was caused, or whether they search for and find this thread, or whether they just no longer trust you, they now have the moral high ground :-(
 

NuLED

Jan 7, 2012
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Is a bit late for me to chime in but I found it strange that it takes 1.2 V batteries and not 1.5, and that might have been something to check first. But, too late for all that.
 

xkubr

Jul 27, 2013
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Jul 27, 2013
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You enjoy the view from the moral high ground while I get my money back. :)
 
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