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How to modify 12-24v car phone charger?

CDRIVE

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I tried to resolder after cleaning the old tip but it got black and black again and the non of the area is now accepting tinning on the tip.

That's because a very important step was missed. After a tip is cleaned (while it's cold) solder should be wrapped around it before it's turned on and gets hot. As the tip heats up the solder wrap will begin to melt. While it's heating but not up to peak temperature it helps to use a clean cotton rag to rub the melting solder onto the tip.

In short, if a soldering iron tip is cleaned (especially unplated copper) it's imperative to not let it oxidize when it heats. If it does it won't take tinning.

Chris
 

CDRIVE

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I forgot to mention that if you have any soldering flux on hand it will greatly reduce chances of the tip oxidizing if applied to the tip while cold and prior to the my previous solder wrap instructions.

Chris
 

73's de Edd

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O.K. just for you ,applicable to YOUR iron and YOUR situation.
Fully taking advantage of the laws of quantum physics and mechanics . . .to further assist.

Yes, I was referring to the new tip, since you seem to be unable to get it to take a tinning.
Plus, the old tip, seems to be nearing the end of its lifespan .
Looking at the tapered, conical end of the soldering tiplet, it appears to extend for ~ 1 cm.
Let's start our tinning approximately 0.5 cm before that tips taper starts.
You will have to figure out how you can hold the irons handle from moving while you are using
both hands to scrape with a knifes blade and apply touches of solder with the other hand.
That could be the use of a vise or some type of clamp, or you could even bind it to something with
a heavy cord or a small rope. Or you could have someone hold it for you.
Considering the use of a sharp pocketknife, since you can always resharpen it or I sometimes use
the two edges of of a single edge razor blade.

Here is how the magic is done :

You plug in the soldering iron to start its heating then you scrape the metal 0.5of a centimeter before
the start of the conical taper, which will let you see exposed shiny metal below it.
Touch the cleaned area with solder to see if it will melt, if not, keep scraping and touching until solder
melts and adheres to the scraped area. As solder progressively adheres and tins, move the scrapes to
the side and down the taper to create an ever larger tinned area.
CLARIFICATION:
The scrapes need to be made towards the tip of the iron . They need to be made hard enough to expose fresh metal. They need to be made in a single movement. Not having the blade in constant contact and making back and forth movements on the tip, as that will unnecessarily carry away needed heat into your knife blade. ( Not to mention the adverse effect on the tempering of the blade .)
After you get a blob of solder to tin onto the triplet, you will find that the solder will be carried forward with the knifeblade scraping to adjunct newly cleaned areas..
This is about the time that you will be thinking, WOW this is working so well !
BUT, that is really the time that you need to reach over and unplug your iron, excess heating is going to be detrimental to your fresh thinning.
So you work with the " flywheel" effect of present heat until the point where you see the solder starting to be sluggish from lower heat.
Then you plug in the soldering iron again to get the temperature back up to normal solder tinning action.
Using this cycling of iron temperature should let you tin the whole tip. . . .without letting excess temperature
burn away your new tinning and blacken the tip.
That can happen later if left in its stand and not being used.

Forgot to ask . . . .since you were able to get heat sink compound . . . .can you get any liquid rosin
soldering flux ?
OR . . . . are we going to have to direct you to a violinist and a bottle of isopropyl alcohol.


73's de Edd
 
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Nauman Muhammad

May 9, 2016
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O.K. just for you ,applicable to YOUR iron and YOUR situation.
Fully taking advantage of the laws of quantum physics and mechanics . . .to further assist.

Yes, I was referring to the new tip, since you seem to be unable to get it to take a tinning.
Plus, the old tip, seems to be nearing the end of its lifespan .
Looking at the tapered, conical end of the soldering tiplet, it appears to extend for ~ 1 cm.
Let's start our tinning approximately 0.5 cm before that tips taper starts.
You will have to figure out how you can hold the irons handle from moving while you are using
both hands to scrape with a knifes blade and apply touches of solder with the other hand.
That could be the use of a vise or some type of clamp, or you could even bind it to something with
a heavy cord or a small rope. Or you could have someone hold it for you.
Considering the use of a sharp pocketknife, since you can always resharpen it or I sometimes use
the two edges of of a single edge razor blade.

Here is how the magic is done :

You plug in the soldering iron to start its heating then you scrape the metal 0.5of a centimeter before
the start of the conical taper, which will let you see exposed shiny metal below it.
Touch the cleaned area with solder to see if it will melt, if not, keep scraping and touching until solder
melts and adheres to the scraped area. As solder progressively adheres and tins, move the scrapes to
the side and down the taper to create an ever larger tinned area.
CLARIFICATION:
The scrapes need to be made towards the tip of the iron . They need to be made hard enough to expose fresh metal. They need to be made in a single movement. Not having the blade in constant contact and making back and forth movements on the tip, as that will unnecessarily carry away needed heat into your knife blade. ( Not to mention the adverse effect on the tempering of the blade .)
After you get a blob of solder to tin onto the triplet, you will find that the solder will be carried forward with the knifeblade scraping to adjunct newly cleaned areas..
This is about the time that you will be thinking, WOW this is working so well !
BUT, that is really the time that you need to reach over and unplug your iron, excess heating is going to be detrimental to your fresh thinning.
So you work with the " flywheel" effect of present heat until the point where you see the solder starting to be sluggish from lower heat.
Then you plug in the soldering iron again to get the temperature back up to normal solder tinning action.
Using this cycling of iron temperature should let you tin the whole tip. . . .without letting excess temperature
burn away your new tinning and blacken the tip.
That can happen later if left in its stand and not being used.

Forgot to ask . . . .since you were able to get heat sink compound . . . .can you get any liquid rosin
soldering flux ?
OR . . . . are we going to have to direct you to a violinist and a bottle of isopropyl alcohol.


73's de Edd


.


Okay I will be cleaning the new tip today using the instruction provided and will use it for soldering.

If flux is know as Soldering paste, then YES I have it, it its something else then I don't have it :'(

I have one more question, can I modify my existing 12v power supply to give me 14v or so to charge my 12v batteries?
 

Nauman Muhammad

May 9, 2016
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That's because a very important step was missed. After a tip is cleaned (while it's cold) solder should be wrapped around it before it's turned on and gets hot. As the tip heats up the solder wrap will begin to melt. While it's heating but not up to peak temperature it helps to use a clean cotton rag to rub the melting solder onto the tip.

In short, if a soldering iron tip is cleaned (especially unplated copper) it's imperative to not let it oxidize when it heats. If it does it won't take tinning.

Chris

OMG, so I need to redo the process! Thanks...
 

Nauman Muhammad

May 9, 2016
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I forgot to mention that if you have any soldering flux on hand it will greatly reduce chances of the tip oxidizing if applied to the tip while cold and prior to the my previous solder wrap instructions.

Chris

If the flux is soldering paste then YES I have it :)
 

73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
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Rosin flux is an effective flux for electronics work, while some soldering "pastes " are quite aggressive. So if you happen to use one of those, you have to be sure that the joint is WELL-WELL-WELL cleaned after finished.
The aggressive pastes will have Zinc Chloride and Ammonium Chloride agents, with the ammonium being the more desirable agent..

The rosin flux will just have dissolved rosin in an alcohol vehicle.



73's de Edd
 
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CDRIVE

Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3
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I greatly prefer the flux paste. I used the clear liquid type only once and found I hated it because it was highly conductive.

Just insure that your soldering paste is intended for electronics ... not plumbing!

Chris
 

Nauman Muhammad

May 9, 2016
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Thanks everyone for guiding me in modification and letting me ammend my soldering iron tip, my tip now looks tinned however I haven't used it.

I will for sure buy rosin flux.
 

73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
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I have one more question, can I modify my existing 12v power supply to give me 14v or so to charge my 12v battery?

We would have to know more about it to determine if there is INITIALLY being that high of a voltage being created within the unit.


73's de Edd
 
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Nauman Muhammad

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I have one more question, can I modify my existing 12v power supply to give me 14v or so to charge my 12v battery?

We would have to know more about it to determine if there is INITIALLY being that high of a voltage being created within the unit.


73's de Edd



.

Can you please refer to my new post for it?

https://www.electronicspoint.com/th...ower-supply-modification.279595/#post-1698618

Now that I have tinned my soldering iron, I hope I will work in better way this time.

Also I had to ask that the converter we made earlier has dropped 0.10 volts and now its giving 9.3v rather than 9.4 amd there is no change in input voltage. What might be the cause?
 

davenn

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Also I had to ask that the converter we made earlier has dropped 0.10 volts and now its giving 9.3v rather than 9.4 amd there is no change in input voltage. What might be the cause?


temperature and component variations ... even changes in your test meter operation
0.1 V is nothing to worry about
 

Nauman Muhammad

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temperature and component variations ... even changes in your test meter operation
0.1 V is nothing to worry about

Oh I see. Actually the original 9v power supply that came with router gives 9.4v so it became my perception that 9.3v will not work good enough :/ And I feel that internet doesn't works properly.
 

davenn

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it should still work well at 9.0V, since that is what it is rated for
it is very rare that voltage is critical in value for a power supply
 

73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
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Sir Nauman Muhammad . . . . . . .

I feel VERY strongly that if I were to disassemble your router and analyze its internal power supply design.
What I would be finding is that your present 9VDC supply is going inside and getting a little initial filtering and then feeding into a 5 volt regulator, and if this is a newer unit, it might divide down, by yet another 3.3 VDC regulator.
Sooooooooo even less than 9 volts would still be an adequate input.

73's de Edd
 
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CDRIVE

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This sounds like a syndrome of the digital age. When all we had was analog meters we could barely see the difference of a 10th of a volt with the exception of the lowest range.

Chris
 
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