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how to properly connect fingerthump potentiometer

pharaon

Oct 28, 2014
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i'd like to connect finger-thump potentiometer as on/off control + volume control to headphone speakers.
i'd like to know the right pin-out for wires to be connected from the output jack
 

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Erstwhile

Apr 12, 2022
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Apr 12, 2022
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i'd like to connect finger-thump potentiometer as on/off control + volume control to headphone speakers.
i'd like to know the right pin-out for wires to be connected from the output jack
Hmmm...
That potentiometer is monaural, are you wanting to control a stereo headphone?
Bertus's drawing shows you the internal workings of your potentiometer.
If your headphone is monaural, you could insert the (on/off) switch into one of the two headphone wires and connect the middle connector of the potentiometer (wiper) to the switch and one of the other connectors of the potentiometer to the other side of where the wire was cut for the insertion.
I would not attempt to use a monaural potentiometer for a stereo headphone.
Also, do you know if the potentiometer is linear or audio taper in its resistance?
 

Alec_t

Jul 7, 2015
3,241
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Jul 7, 2015
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i'd like to connect finger-thump potentiometer as on/off control + volume control to headphone speakers.
I don't know what a 'fingerthump' pot is (I assume it's thumbwheel operated, or musician-speak for some other type).
For volume control you will need one dual-track pot or, if you want independent control of the two channels, two single-track pots.
The only dual-track switched pots I'm familiar with have just one SPST switch, so I don't see how that would be able to switch both channels on/off using only passive components. The pot(s) should be logarithmic-track (audio taper).
 

Erstwhile

Apr 12, 2022
43
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Apr 12, 2022
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in fact yes it's stereo headphone, it was connected but the wires got lose and i want to do it the right way

what exactly do you mean?
A potentiometer used for audio purposes, often has a logarithmic taper.
As opposed to a linear taper potentiometer.
With a linear potentiometer, the resistance changes in a "linear" fashion to the position of the wiper.
So, at 1/4th rotation, 1/4th of the total resistance is measured at the wiper; at 1/2 the rotation, 1/2 the resistance is measured and so on.
But with an audio taper or logarithmic taper potentiometer, this is not so. With a logarithmic taper potentiometer, the amount of resistance measured at the wiper (the middle connector) increases logarithmically with the rotation. So, at 1/2 rotation it will have much less than 1/2 the resistance at the wiper and the amount of resistance will increase rapidly after the 1/2 point.
This is because... people like it that way; it gives them finer control in the first half of the rotation, but lets them "pour on the coal" in the second half of the rotation when they want the output loud.
 
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