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I know this has to be easy? But I just can't figure it out. :)

wilsoe

Jul 28, 2010
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I would like to purchase a replacement relay and I can't for the life of me figure this out. I know it has to be easy. :) What is this relays model number?
SCL-DPDT ?

This is a link to the manufacturer's website and data sheet.
http://www.songchuanusa.com/products/scl/

Thanks
 

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Harald Kapp

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It should be the one you linked, just plain SCL (DPDT = short for Double Pole Double Throw).
 

wilsoe

Jul 28, 2010
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Yes I understand the SCL-DPDT part and the casing code part, light, no light, button, etc. The doc explained all that pretty well. But not how to identify what you have..... unless I missed that.

So I looked a little longer and I believe I figured it out?
You read just the top line?
Song Chuan SCL-DPDT 120VAC 10A or model number SCL-DPDT-120VAC
Is that right?

I was looking for the part again and mouser doesn't sell a 250V AC coil so it must be 120V AC right? But mouser also doesn't sell a 120V 10A either? Is the 12A really this 10A relay?

Thanks I just really spent a long time on this and I know it is stupid easy to the right person. Just not me it is trying to drive me crazy! :)
Thanks

Product Link
mouser cat page
 

Harald Kapp

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Measure the coil resistance and compare to the values in the datasheet. The datasheet specifies coil ratings up to 240 V (AC). That it is not in the mouser catalog doesn't mean this type doesn't exist.
However, operating a relay with AC and at 120 V or 240 C is not very common. Where was the original relay used? Can you measure the operating voltae of the coil in that circuit?
 

wilsoe

Jul 28, 2010
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I know the answer to this. :) It will show 110v ac it is not getting 220v ac. This is for a 110v bill acceptor rigged up to a controller. This is the relay that the manufacturer of the changer provides and I would like to have a replacement for it. But can't part it.

I believe the relay (I have not checked anything out) will somehow cut power to the bill acceptor? The problem is if the user puts money into the bill acceptor to fast the changer will steal money.... Small problem. :)

My last version of this relay harness setup was a poor quality aftermarket version with a epoxy ridden box. This version seems better built but not a solid state relay. A solid state relay should last a lot longer right?

So it should be a 110v ac coil then right?
 

Harald Kapp

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If the coil of the original relay sees 110 V (AC) then the replacement surely needs the same specification.

I believe the relay (I have not checked anything out) will somehow cut power to the bill acceptor?
How should we (I) know? You're the one who has access to the machine.

You're right, a solid state relay can last longer as long as the operating conditions (load voltage and load current) are observed. You have made no statement on these conditions.
Also: to operate a solid state relay from 110 V (AC) you will need additional circuitry to lower the voltage , rectify and smooth it. You cannot attach a solid state relay's inpout directly to 110 V (AC).
 

wilsoe

Jul 28, 2010
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I understand that the rules state that you need to explain/describe what is going on with the device.

But.... I really thought that this was just a deciphering issue. The relay does have all the data on the top and I thought I was just reading it incorrectly or didn't know what I was doing. Now I am guessing the manufacturer stamps that on the top just to cause trouble and it's not easy like I thought.
Sorry for the confusion.
 
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