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Increasing Voltage With Multiple Ignition Coils?

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Reldar

Feb 16, 2012
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After viewing this video:

I decided to have a go with it myself and create some sparks using ignition coils.
Now without sounding too ignorant... How can I connect multiple ignition coils (3+) in series together to create higher voltages (and thus longer sparks)?

This is my set-up with 1 coil:
v4Mng.png



And my set-up with 2 coils (a longer spark is created):
VnEQf.png



I want to be able to connect 3+ coils increasing the voltage further. Is this possible?
Many thanks.
 

GreenGiant

Feb 9, 2012
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unless ignition coils dont need specific polarities the second image would not work

You need to connect the positive from the first (top) to the negative of the second (bottom) and the positive of the second to the neutral line

BUT unless you have experience with these voltages and such DO NOT PLAY AROUND WITH 240VAC
 

Reldar

Feb 16, 2012
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unless ignition coils dont need specific polarities the second image would not work

You need to connect the positive from the first (top) to the negative of the second (bottom) and the positive of the second to the neutral line

I assume they don't need specific polarities, because the second image does work.
I have tested the exact set-up myself.


BUT unless you have experience with these voltages and such DO NOT PLAY AROUND WITH 240VAC

I appreciate the advice, but how am I supposed to gain experience without using it first?
 
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Raven Luni

Oct 15, 2011
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I appreciate the advice, but how am I supposed to gain experience without using it first?

With something that can kill you, you dont. You build up alot of knowledge, preferably some training and better still a qualification or 2. Take it from a complete amateur with none of these things (well except a hobbyist level knowledge). :)
 

CocaCola

Apr 7, 2012
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I appreciate the advice, but how am I supposed to gain experience without using it first?

It's called schooling, usually it revolves around reading and studying the principles that apply and getting a complete understanding of the topic at hand...

To make it clear you very well might NOT get a second chance if you make a mistake or do something wrong! AKA you will be deceased...
 

Raven Luni

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Did I ever mention the time as a child my friend and I tried making an arc welder in his house from 2 pencils because it was in an epidose of wonder woman (and they say computer games are a bad influence these days)...... Good job that fusebox was there and did its job :D

Heres another way to put it. Find out exactly how much electricity is lethal to a human (and be sure to know your volts form your amps). Maybe it will put what you are doing in perspective.

What the coke man says: you make a mistake, you WILL die!
 

CocaCola

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Good job that fusebox was there and did its job :D

Unfortunately it's level of protection does not insure it won't be lethal... At the mains 120/240 Volts and 50/60 Hz as little as 0.1 Amps can be fatal, thus the 15/20/25/30/32/45 or what not Amp breaker isn't going to help you at all if everything falls in order and goes wrong...
 

Raven Luni

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Exactly - It blew because we shorted the mains supply before we got a chance to accidentally touch anything. We werent even using plugs - just single pins stuck into the socket holes and our hands up our sleeves - lol. It actually frightens me to recall this :p
 

Reldar

Feb 16, 2012
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I'm sorry, but why am I constantly informed of how dangerous electricity is and how it is lethal? Why do people assume I am completely ignorant of this fact? Is it because of my low post count?
I have enough knowledge to comprehend the power I am dealing with.
I am simply looking for some advice with placing ignition coils in series.


It's called schooling, usually it revolves around reading and studying the principles that apply and getting a complete understanding of the topic at hand...

Schooling/training is being shown how to do something or gaining an insight on how something functions/works.
Experience is actually doing something yourself.

I need experience to work with AC, but I cannot gain that experience until I first work with AC. = "A paradoxical situation in which an individual cannot avoid a problem because of contradictory constraints or rules."
 
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CocaCola

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I'm sorry, but why am I constantly informed of how dangerous electricity is and how it is lethal? Why do people assume I am completely ignorant of this fact? Is it because of my low post count?

Nope, because you asked Basic 101 level questions like this...

I am simply looking for some advice with placing ignition coils in series.
If you don't understand the basics like series wiring, then it's a very logical conclusion that you don't have an understanding or grasp of what you are doing at the most basic levels... It might not be obvious to you but to those that are experienced it's a HUGE red flag of your lack of knowledge on the subject matter...

Schooling/training is being shown how to do something or gaining an insight on how something functions/works.
Experience is actually doing something yourself.
IMO you have not business attempting to get your 'experience' until you have the schooling/understanding under your belt that will allow you to safely approach getting that 'experience'...

I need experience to work with AC
IMO, you need a solid foundation in electricity as a whole, you don't need any 'experience' to learn how to wire something in series, be it AC or DC...

"A paradoxical situation in which an individual cannot avoid a problem because of contradictory constraints or rules."
"...a little knowledge is apt to puff up, and make men giddy, but a greater share of it will set them right, and bring them to low and humble thoughts of themselves."
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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I'm sorry, but why am I constantly informed of how dangerous electricity is and how it is lethal? Why do people assume I am completely ignorant of this fact? Is it because of my low post count?

To me, it was because you suggested using a device designed for 12V DC in a 240V AC environment.

There are so many reasons why that's a bad idea that anyone with basic knowledge would have discarded this idea the moment it popped into their head.
 

CDRIVE

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Just for the record.. While 100mA seems to be the magic figure that's considered lethal, hospitals work under much lower (JACO) guidelines. Bio-Med Techs are instructed that anything > 10mA through the heart is verboten.

Anyone want to get into a betting pool on whether or not this thread makes it into our secret circuit circus? :rolleyes:
 

CocaCola

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Just for the record.. While 100mA seems to be the magic figure that's considered lethal, hospitals work under much lower (JACO) guidelines. Bio-Med Techs are instructed that anything > 10mA through the heart is verboten.

You actually never find a "lethal dose" value set in stone as way to many variables factor in and no two people are the same... But, the short of it (as exemplified above) it only takes a tiny tiny bit for a very short time to cause major if not life threatening complications or immediate death...

I find that people in general just get way too comfortable with electricity, especially since it's part of our daily life and it's all around us... The whole "It can kill you in an instant" reality never seems to set in as well as it should...
 

CDRIVE

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Todays electronics experimenters have far more cheap off the shelf (isolated) power supply options available to them than we ever had at that stage in our knowledge curve. So why are they constantly wanting to jump start their heart on the mains?

Besides the shock issue there's the fire,.. or very least, potential expensive house wiring damage. It doesn't happen often but circuit breakers have been known to fail. If is does the Main breaker @ 200A typical is next in line. Damn well better pray it blows!
 

Reldar

Feb 16, 2012
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Okay guys, you have made your points.
You are right. It is most probably a better idea for me to gain a greater understanding in general before (if ever) I attempt any experiments.

I am grateful for the information and advice you have passed onto me.

Cheers.
 
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Raven Luni

Oct 15, 2011
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If youre interested in seeing high voltage sparks, there are plenty of you tube videos of people who do these experiments so you dont have to. I recommend searching for Photonic Induction - hes a funny guy (and a pro) and has some serious kit that he likes to blow things up with.
 

CDRIVE

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OK, I think you've taken enough of a beating so here's my contribution to your topic. Isolation transformers aren't cheap and they're not that easy to find but step down 12V transformers are abundant and inexpensive. If you're going to continue experimenting with mains level voltages may I suggest an arrangement like this. It will give you and your home a high degree of safety.

To be clear... The 240VAC that's developed on the output of this circuit can still KILL YOU! Proceed with great caution.
 

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duke37

Jan 9, 2011
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To go back to the original question, the answer is no.

Ignition coils are auto transformers with input and output connected together. In order to connect the secondaries in series for higher voltage, it is necessary to have the primary and secondary isolated from each other.

An alternative way of producing a high voltage is to use a voltage multiplier (Cockroft/Walton) such as is used in televisions to get several kV.
 

gto_ron

Oct 5, 2011
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The Forum members aren't trying to squash your desire to learn but the the circuits you presented have so much wrong with them it's hard to say where to start. Why not just start with a switched 12v source on the primary? That should be good for about 20KV at the output. Once your comfortable with that( get shocked a few times) add more components and gradually get to the effects you want. Just stay away from mains voltages.

Most of us on the Forum have been shocked a few times at line values( 120 -- 240) that's why we take it so seriously. You can be dead quickly.

When I worked as a mechanic(many years ago) the service manager thought it was funny to grab an ignition wire from a car I was under with the engine running. He would then then grab my ear. It was only funny if you weren't the guy whose ear was grabbed.

good luck

Ron
 
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