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Is it possible to use LM2596 buck converter to a 24V dc battery and connect it to a 12Vdc/220Vac inverter to supply raspberry pi 4B?

kurisu

Mar 14, 2023
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We are supposed to use an inverter that can allow 24V dc as the input voltage since our source is 24V (two 12-V batteries connected in series, hence, 24V source) to be used as a supply for our raspberry pi 4B (but the source should be an ac to make it work, that's why an inverter is needed). Our group mistakenly bought a 12Vdc/220Vac inverter. We have a dc-dc step down buck converter (LM2596) and we are not sure if it can step down the 24V from the battery to maybe at maximum 12V or less which will flow through the 12Vdc/220Vac inverter that can make our raspberry pi 4B work.
 

Harald Kapp

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I don't fully understand: What's the use of the inverter? You can step down the 24 V from the batteries directly to 5 V using the LM2596.
Of course you can also step down 24 V -> 12 V, then use the inverter to step up DC 12 V -> AC 220 V and then AC 220 V -> DC 5 V, but that is terribly inefficient. You may also run into issues with peak current requirements of the LM2596 and the inverter.

There's no way to instruct you from afar without knowing many more details of the step-down module and the inverter. Give it a try.
 

kurisu

Mar 14, 2023
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I don't fully understand: What's the use of the inverter? You can step down the 24 V from the batteries directly to 5 V using the LM2596.
Of course you can also step down 24 V -> 12 V, then use the inverter to step up DC 12 V -> AC 220 V and then AC 220 V -> DC 5 V, but that is terribly inefficient. You may also run into issues with peak current requirements of the LM2596 and the inverter.

There's no way to instruct you from afar without knowing many more details of the step-down module and the inverter. Give it a try.
We need an inverter since our raspberry pi requires an AC source but the one that supplies our whole circuitry is 24V battery which is DC. The purpose of the buck converter is to make the voltage input compatible to the required voltage input of the inverter (because, like what I said, we mistakenly bought an inverter that can only allow 12V from a dc but our battery is 24V).

24V (DC) battery --> buck converter --> 12V (DC) --> 12Vdc/220Vac inverter --> 220V (AC) --> Raspberry pi 4B

Also, your suggestion of stepping down the 24Vdc to 5Vdc for raspi, we have already tried that and our buck converter blew up.

Btw, still thanks for the reply :)
 
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Harald Kapp

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our raspberry pi requires an AC source
Since when does a Raspberry Pi run on AC?
The Raspberry power supply, while on Ac on the primary side, outputs 5.1 V (max. 3 A) Dc on the secondary side. That's what the Raspberry Pi is powered from.

Also, your suggestion of stepping down the 24Vdc to 5Vdc for raspi, we have already tried that and our buck converter blew up.
Then you made an error. Wrong connections, or the converter is not rated for the current the Raspberry requires.
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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The LM2596 MAXIMUM output is 3A - too narrow a margin to be used for a Raspi.

Simplest and easiest method would be to purchase a buck converter (ready-made) to deliver 5V at 5A and use the 24V source to power it.
 

Maglatron

Jul 12, 2023
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you could try a voltage divider for the 24v dc and make it so that it puts out 5v dc for the rasberry pi, with only resistors. the 220v from the wall will have lowered it to 5v anyway because it's an adapter
 
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Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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you could try a voltage divider for the 24v dc and make it so that it puts out 5v dc for the rasberry pi, with only resistors. the 220v from the wall will have lowered it to 5v anyway because it's an adapter
A voltage divider won’t give anywhere near enough current.

Martin
 

Maglatron

Jul 12, 2023
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oh

I've never worked with buck converters I'm looking them up!

oh I see an LRC circuit decrease the voltage increase the current

buck converters are cool!
 

roughshawd

Jul 13, 2020
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As per buck converters and freq machines like Arduino. I think voltage becomes an issue when you are switching with freqs. If the question is
'is it possible' ...
Well I don't know...keep trying!!!

i once imagined a circuit that loops til proper then sends when enabled, but that is basically an ideal mainframe dunno
 
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