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Joining NiCd batteries - conducting glue

boblalux

Aug 15, 2016
20
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Aug 15, 2016
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I have to join 12 1.2V NiCd batteries to form a pack of 14.4V. As I cannot purchase tagged batteries (the direction of the tags is not correct for my pack), the solution would be to solder each of these tagged battery together. I have tried this, but it's just too difficult to solder.
Question: Can I use a conductive glue, which will accept up to 1 amp, and exhibit a very low resistance? If so, must I buy relatively expesive silver/epoxy glue, or can I make it by mixing carbon powder:Epoxy at 1:1?
 

Externet

Aug 24, 2009
823
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Aug 24, 2009
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823
Forget about glue; but if you succeed insisting on it, let us know which glue worked.
Wrong tabs orientation can be corrected folding the needed tab as 'origami' towards the desired direction.
Or, simply, solder wires between tabs. Perhaps AWG 14-16
 

Audioguru

Sep 24, 2016
3,640
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Sep 24, 2016
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Ni-Cad cells were used a long time ago. They are not used for much anymore because they are toxic and have problems. Why not use modern Ni-MH cells instead?

My AA Ni-Cads had a capacity of 600mAh. My modern Ni-MH cells are 2300mAh which is almost 4 times more. New Ni-cads held a charge for 2 months. Modern Ni-MH cells hold a charge for 12 months.
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
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Jan 5, 2010
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7,682
Capacity is not the whole story though. NiCads can produce a lot more current than NiMH cells that may have much higher capacity. I tried replacing the worn out NiCads in a drill / driver with NIMH and, even though they had twice the capacity, they would not run the drill because they could not produce the required current. I ended up getting replacement NICads instead.

Bob
 

Audioguru

Sep 24, 2016
3,640
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Sep 24, 2016
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I remember that I needed to zap my Ni-Cad cells with a charged capacitor. The cells developed a short circuit from crystalline formation inside them.
 

shrtrnd

Jan 15, 2010
3,826
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Jan 15, 2010
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35 years ago there was a build-it-yourself circuit for 'zapping' dead Ni-Cads to rejuvenate them in Popular Electronics. I built one for a friend of mine and he was pretty happy with it.
After all these years, thanks Audioguru for explaining what exactly that circuit was zapping.
I didn't know for certain before.
 
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