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Led Lamp

Jeffro

Mar 28, 2015
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Mar 28, 2015
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I was hoping some one could help me wire up this lamp i bought. I need to know how to plug it into the wall and how to hook it up to the LED. I don't know that much about electronics but I'm sure it can't be that difficult to wire this up. Also I have tools.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/100W-High-P...372?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a2e243d5c

$T2eC16J,!yEE9s5jDY95BR)U!FVjs!~~60_57.JPG
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
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A description here for the power supply alone says the red wires connect to AC power and the black and white wires connect to the LED. Scroll to the bottom of the web page to see "datasheet".

Don't you just love all the undocumented Chinese "stuff" that is spewing forth to land around the world? It may be time to learn Mandarin and call the vendors for details, what with international telephone calling rates plummeting. Or send them an e-mail for free.
 

Jeffro

Mar 28, 2015
3
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So should i just get a house plug and connect it (wire it) to the red wires. Which one of the wires is negative and which one is positive, of the black and white wires. If I wanted to put a on/off switch to this where would I put it? I'm not sure where the wires hook up on the LED ether?
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
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So should i just get a house plug and connect it (wire it) to the red wires. Which one of the wires is negative and which one is positive, of the black and white wires. If I wanted to put a on/off switch to this where would I put it? I'm not sure where the wires hook up on the LED ether?
You should at least wire an in-line glass cartridge fuse, about 1 A SLO-BLO, in series with one of the red wires before connecting it to a power cord, Maybe wire an in-line switch in series too so you can turn it on and off. You can purchase in-line fuse holders online, as well as in-line rocker switches designed for insertion in one wire of a 2-wire zip cord. Or try a big-box home improvement store for these parts as well as the zip cord. It is often less trouble to just buy a zip-cord type extension cord (usually 18 gauge wire) and cut the recpetacle(s) off the end, leaving the plug for the wall outlet.

You may need a cheap multimeter to help determine the polarity of the LED lamp. Unfortunately, the ohmmeter function won't be of much help. The forward voltage drop of the series-connected LEDs is about 35 V, way more than the little battery inside the VOM (volt-ohm-milliamp meter) can provide to forward bias the LED. So it will probably read "open circuit" using the ohmmeter function. So, use the power supply output to either forward bias or reverse bias the LED and determine which is which.

Here's how: Connect a 1000 ohm, 1 watt, resistor in series with the white wire of the power supply output (to limit current in case something goes wrong) and then connect the black power supply wire and the other end of the resistor to the LED. Since the polarity of the LED isn't obvious to you, there is a 50-50 chance of getting the polarity correct.

If the LED lights up (dimly because of the resistor limiting the current), you are done. Disconnect the resistor and connect the white wire to the LED. The black wire should already be connected to the LED. If it doesn't light up, reverse the leads going to the LED. The LED should now light up and you can remove the resistor for full-power operation.
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
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Need I mention that the power supply must be enclosed to prohibit contact by humans, who might otherwise become ex-humans?

Bob
 

hevans1944

Hop - AC8NS
Jun 21, 2012
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Need I mention that the power supply must be enclosed to prohibit contact by humans, who might otherwise become ex-humans?

Bob
Yeah, glad you mentioned that. It appears that @Jeffro may somewhat lack experience in the area of safe electronics construction... just going by the conversation so far.
 

shumifan50

Jan 16, 2014
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Most of these very high power LEDs also require a further heat sink, so the LED should really be mounted on metal to assist with heat dissipation.

It might be possible to determine the polarity by looking at how the black and white wires are connected to the 2 electrolytic caps on the output side of the board as the polarity will be marked on the caps. At a guess the white wire will be the positive. A digital multimeter will be even easier as the readout will show negative if it is connected the wrong way around.

The polarity on the LED is marked with + and -
 
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HellasTechn

Apr 14, 2013
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Yes theese LED's get pretty hot... be carefull. i am certain you will need proper heatsink
 
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