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LED Wiring Help

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
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Hello!
This is my first time posting.
Electrics is something I am not good at, so hopefully someone can help me with this:

I want to make a diorama for my nephew for Christmas that serves as a mood lamp. He is nuts about the whole Mandolorian thing, so I am building a 1/12 model of Boba Fett with modifications to represent my nephew if he was a Mandolorian.

The figure will be blasting off with the rocket pack while being attacked by a tentacled thing. The smoke/fire from the rocket pack will be engulfing much of the creature, while in Mando's right hand is a "dark saber" and in his left a blaster. He will be blasting a hole through the creature's head and has just cut off a tentacle.

This is how the model will will light up:
~A blue LED filament for the dark saber in his right hand.
~A red LED filament (maybe two) coming out of the blaster and going through the creature's head.
~Three or four LED filaments OR a tape type LED. These will be wrapped around the support rod for the figure, which will then have cotton (airbrushed with yellow, red, and black) to simulate the smoke and fire from the rocket pack.

The fire effect I want to create will be similar to this:
The part about the lights is at 7:50

So the filaments are 3volts, 100mA
Here is a link to what I am using:

I don't want to burn these out, but I'd like for them to be nice and bright, and to last.
I was told a wall adapter would have to be 120v to 3V to 100mA with 8-10 watts.
I have not been able to find anything like that. Best is the power unit says a bunch of volts etc.

Is there a way to do this without running down the life of the LED filaments?
I suppose one way would be to use a two AA battery holder and switch for the saber and one for the blaster bolt, and something else for the fire part, but that seems unnecessarily complicated.
Is there a way to use another power source for all of it? This way he can just switch it on. A wall unit would be great because he won't need batteries.
I asked someone about using a resistor in the line, but they said if it burns out the power will kill the LEDs. As you can imagine, I don't want to have to tear into this model a few months down the road.

I also have thought of getting one of those LED light-bulbs that has those filaments inside, and taking it apart and using whatever electronics are in there to power the LEDs at 3V using the 120 power, but I don't want to create a fire hazard.

Please note that I am totally ignorant of electric except positive negative. If anyone can give me some simple, or simplified, ideas, I would appreciate it greatly!

Here is a rough sketch I did to help me visualize the build...
IMG_0443.jpg

Thanks in advance!
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
1,793
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I'll address your blue filament.
That filament has a (COB) which is an acronym for
(Chip On Board).
Power in Watts equals Voltage (V) multiplied by Current (I) in Amps .
P= V × I.
P =3 volts×100mA.
=300mWatts or 3/10'ths of a Watt of Power.
1701492449383.png

That COB will draw only 100 milliamps of current.
If your power supply is 3 volts at 1 amp that cob will only draw 100 milliamps. The voltage is critical you must only supply 3 volts and the current will take care of itself.
Here is a rough sketch I did to help me visualize the build..
Rough sketch??
That's a work of art.
Very impressive.
 
Last edited:

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
6,854
Joined
Oct 5, 2014
Messages
6,854
LEDs are like anything else and may detoriate over time.(most likely will)
Suggest you build it so the strip can be replaced.

Other than that, for power, one could get a 5v plugpack and add a 3v converter to suit.
They cost next to nothing and should provide sufficient current drive given the right unit is selected.

However, lacking any real specs on the lED strip, be aware they may need a driver to limit the current and the driver may well be specific to this particular LED strip/strips.

Note:- looked several places and they say no driver required for current limiting.
The voltage though MUST be at 3v or less...therefore the one shown below.
There are others but I have found these particular type to be fairly reliable.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/173969793679



Voltage must be set to 3v level BEFORE connecting LED strip.
One unit will do all 3 colours at 100mA a piece.

Again though, things tend to bugger up now and then so make it so any unit can be replaced.
 

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Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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I'll address your blue filament
Okay. So after seeing the video which I hate to do... Everything looks positive you want to use the same filament manufacturer. Specifications for different color filliments are exactly the same as the blue filament.
Therefore,all you have to do is add up the current.
So you say, "three or four LED filaments" so one amp would be excellent and a regulated 3 volts. the below link is for reference only I am not recommending it because I have never purchased it.
Whatever you do, do not skimp on your power supply.
I've seen cheaper ones and would not touch them.it'll ruin your filaments.
And note it does say they're for 50 LEDs. Ignore that!
All you are looking for is a regulated 3 volts.If you'd like to add more filaments say 10 filaments the 3 volt 2 amps would be great. What will happen is...
your power supply will run cooler and last you longer & you must connect your filaments in parallel.
Easy peasy lemon squeezy!
By the way ; 1,000 milliamps is 1 Amp.

Description
Our 3 Volt 1 amp power supply adapter can run 1 - 50 LEDs and is Guaranteed to correctly run all of our 3 Volt DC LEDs

1 Amp will run from 1 - 50 LEDs
2 Amp will run from 1 - 100 LEDs
These regulated power supplies will put out exactly 3 Volts of power if you hook one single LED to it, or hook the maximum number of LEDs to it. They are regulated and able to run delicate electronics like LEDs and circuits.

These UL listed Adapter / Transformers convert wall current to 3 Volt DC output, perfect for our 3 volt LEDs.

Input: AC 120-240V 60HZ 10W Output: Regulated 3V DC 1000mA Center positive
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
1,793
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
1,793
So you say, "three or four LED filaments" so one amp would be excellent and a regulated 3 volts
Four led filaments (any color)
is 400mA.
3V×400mA=1200mW or 1. 2 Watts.
If price for power supply is limited and you are able to locate a power supply .
The minimum I would choose would be a 3-volt AC to DC converter(Wall Adapter ) rated at 2 Watts.
That would be absolute minimum power supply that would not create a fire hazard.
I was told a wall adapter would have to be 120v to 3V to 100mA with 8-10 watts.
That is incorrect.
A belated.Welcome to Maker Pro.
:)
 

RodWells

Nov 30, 2023
1
Joined
Nov 30, 2023
Messages
1
For your LED diorama, use a 3V DC power supply with a current rating of 100mA. Wire the LEDs in parallel, each with its resistor, ensuring even brightness. Calculate resistors using Ohm's Law. Connect everything to a common ground, and add an on/off switch for convenience. Test before integrating into the diorama.
 

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
6
LEDs are like anything else and may detoriate over time.(most likely will)
Suggest you build it so the strip can be replaced.

Other than that, for power, one could get a 5v plugpack and add a 3v converter to suit.
They cost next to nothing and should provide sufficient current drive given the right unit is selected.

However, lacking any real specs on the lED strip, be aware they may need a driver to limit the current and the driver may well be specific to this particular LED strip/strips.

Note:- looked several places and they say no driver required for current limiting.
The voltage though MUST be at 3v or less...therefore the one shown below.
There are others but I have found these particular type to be fairly reliable.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/173969793679



Voltage must be set to 3v level BEFORE connecting LED strip.
One unit will do all 3 colours at 100mA a piece.

Again though, things tend to bugger up now and then so make it so any unit can be replaced.
Thank you!
Unfortunately, that item doesn't ship to the United States. I'll look on US ebay for it.

I ordered this from Amazon before seeing the above post.

You think that will work?

Even if it does, I'd like to get a few of those converters you listed.
 

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
6
Okay. So after seeing the video which I hate to do... Everything looks positive you want to use the same filament manufacturer. Specifications for different color filliments are exactly the same as the blue filament.
Therefore,all you have to do is add up the current.
So you say, "three or four LED filaments" so one amp would be excellent and a regulated 3 volts. the below link is for reference only I am not recommending it because I have never purchased it.
Whatever you do, do not skimp on your power supply.
I've seen cheaper ones and would not touch them.it'll ruin your filaments.
And note it does say they're for 50 LEDs. Ignore that!
All you are looking for is a regulated 3 volts.If you'd like to add more filaments say 10 filaments the 3 volt 2 amps would be great. What will happen is...
your power supply will run cooler and last you longer & you must connect your filaments in parallel.
Easy peasy lemon squeezy!
By the way ; 1,000 milliamps is 1 Amp.

Description
Our 3 Volt 1 amp power supply adapter can run 1 - 50 LEDs and is Guaranteed to correctly run all of our 3 Volt DC LEDs

1 Amp will run from 1 - 50 LEDs
2 Amp will run from 1 - 100 LEDs
These regulated power supplies will put out exactly 3 Volts of power if you hook one single LED to it, or hook the maximum number of LEDs to it. They are regulated and able to run delicate electronics like LEDs and circuits.

These UL listed Adapter / Transformers convert wall current to 3 Volt DC output, perfect for our 3 volt LEDs.

Input: AC 120-240V 60HZ 10W Output: Regulated 3V DC 1000mA Center positive
Thanks!
I ordered this before seeing this post:

Not sure it will work-not here yet. I like the one in your link better.
 

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
6
For your LED diorama, use a 3V DC power supply with a current rating of 100mA. Wire the LEDs in parallel, each with its resistor, ensuring even brightness. Calculate resistors using Ohm's Law. Connect everything to a common ground, and add an on/off switch for convenience. Test before integrating into the diorama.
Thanks. Two have been suggested so far, and I ordered this:

Not sure it it will work, so I may order the one above.
 

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
6
Thank you all for the help! It really has made a difference!
Apologies for not checking back sooner: haven't gotten notifications of the replies (need to check spam maybe). And, I'm so swamped I forgot to check until right now.

Either way, I will post photos of the finished protect once I am done.

Here's one I did for a party, as a centerpiece for a table. I was told a few days before the party.
I wanted to have a little lamp in his hands that flickered, but the figure (which came in solid white) and other items arrived the day before I had to have it ready. I had to basically throw it together in a couple of hours and blow-dry it to make some of the paint dry on time. I made the sleigh from polystyrene sheet (the "skis") and pop-sickle sticks.

IMG_0509.jpg
 

CommanderZarkon

Dec 2, 2023
6
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
6
LEDs are like anything else and may detoriate over time.(most likely will)
Suggest you build it so the strip can be replaced.

Other than that, for power, one could get a 5v plugpack and add a 3v converter to suit.
They cost next to nothing and should provide sufficient current drive given the right unit is selected.

However, lacking any real specs on the lED strip, be aware they may need a driver to limit the current and the driver may well be specific to this particular LED strip/strips.

Note:- looked several places and they say no driver required for current limiting.
The voltage though MUST be at 3v or less...therefore the one shown below.
There are others but I have found these particular type to be fairly reliable.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/173969793679



Voltage must be set to 3v level BEFORE connecting LED strip.
One unit will do all 3 colours at 100mA a piece.

Again though, things tend to bugger up now and then so make it so any unit can be replaced.
I found them on ebay-I think. What power gets hooked to that, and where?

Is this the same?

 
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