Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Looking For A Low RPM <30rpm Motor

roonyroo

Jul 13, 2012
13
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
13
Hi,

Im looking for a very low rpm lower then 30rpm motor but high force ie must be able to move around 5-10kgs minimum of force

It has to move ridiculously slow, the slower the better ... but puts out decent amount of force

I basically dont know what these motors are called, or what to look for

Basically if I could get some sort of specs of what to look for, ie watts etc., much appreciated

Im at the moment thinking of getting something like a ceiling fan & weighing it down with weights to control the speed

A motor built from the ground up to operate low speeds would obviously be alot better ...

thnx
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
7,682
What you need a 30 RPM gear motor. Look it up on google.

Bob
 

roonyroo

Jul 13, 2012
13
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
13
Thnx,
Theres plenty of 30 RPM motors, but I need to move around 5-10 kg weight, more even

What sort of rating or specs should I be looking for if I wanted to move say around 20kg or higher at low rpm?

High watts, low rpm?

Or should I just get the highest wattage motor I can get & not worry about the rpm, as the weight will slow it down?

thnx

I found some motors which state 30kg torque, will these actually be able to move a 30kg weight?

http://www.sourcingmap.com/31kgcm-t...gle&utm_medium=froogle&utm_campaign=ukfroogle
 
Last edited:

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,505
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,505
It all depends on what you're trying to do.

Is this weight balanced on the top of the motor, and the motor is rotating it? Or are you trying to lift the weight from the ground? Or perhaps something else.
 

duke37

Jan 9, 2011
5,364
Joined
Jan 9, 2011
Messages
5,364
Do the works out of a microwave cooker do what you want? It has a slow motor and a bearing to take the weight. If you take one out of a dead microwave be very careful of the very high voltages which could still be present inside.
 

CocaCola

Apr 7, 2012
3,635
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
3,635
So many variables... Mount 30kg on skinny wheels (12" LPs) and you can roll it along a flat surface all day with a tiny hobby motor... But, that same motor isn't going to have an easy go if at all trying to lift 30kg... And it's doubtful that the same motor could drag a 30kg block up a 45 degree incline...

Application and variables are very important...
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
7,682
You have to understand torque. Torque is the product of a radius and a force. Say the motor is going to spin a disk that is 10cm in radius, and it takes a force of 3kg to push the outer edge of that disk to rotate it. Then a torque of 30 kg cm is needed. If you can figure out your requirement in those terms (or lb inches for U.S.) then you can choose an approriate motor. You would choose a motor that can deliver a comfortable margin above the requirement for the job.

Bob
 

roonyroo

Jul 13, 2012
13
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
13
Thnx for the reply guys,

The motor has to directly move the weight ...

Even though the idea of putting it on wheels could be a good idea, but it complicates things ...

Im basically trying to rotate a weight around a pole, to test motor strength, putting it on wheels is a great idea, perhaps on tracks ... but for now I need to move the weight directly

I saw a gear motor with a rating of 176kg ...

Do I need a gear box or something for a gear motor, or can I just run it as a normal dc motor, ie just add current?

thnx
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
7,682
A gear motor is a motor + a gear box, so no, you do not need a gearbox if you find a gear motor going at the desire RPM.

Motors are not rated in Kg (unless it is the weight of the motor). The are, as I said before rated in Kg cm.

You need to learn some basic physics. Keeping a weight moving does not take any work -- on a frictionless surface. Lifting a weight does. Moving it against friction does. So are you moving it vertically, horizontally or a combination? Are you sliding it on sandpaper or does it have some kind of low friction bearing? These make more difference than the weight itself. Why don't you try describing what you are trying to do in a way that we could do it ourselves if we had to.

Bob
 
Top