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Looking for good o-scope and soldering iron

Creativebrain116

Feb 7, 2024
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Good evening yall,

I am newer to the electronics hobbyist group and I am starting to acquire the correct equipment I need. I already have a power supply, DMM, Rpi, arduino uno, breadboard and some misc components. However I am missing a quality soldering iron and a good o-scope that is under $200. Any ideas? Thanks in advance and God Bless!
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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Welcome to Maker Pro.
Advice only.
Look for a cheap used analog two channel 200 MegaHertz scope. The control layout is straightforward,switching characteristics of settings is instantaneous based on the physics of a scanning cathode ray tube a better first introduction to an advanced instrument, in my not so humble opinion far Superior than a DSO
For first contact.
I can only show you how not to hold a soldering iron.
Good luck to you...
photo_1707286787085.png
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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in my not so humble opinion far Superior than a DSO
Hard to find a good analog 200 MHz scope today. Comparatively inexpensive ones (with all the classic knobs etc.) from Fnirsi or Hantek or similar are easily obtainable and possibly even better accuracy-wise than an old analog scope.

I can only show you how not to hold a soldering iron.
Rotfl :D

Weller is a brand name for a reason, but also expensive. They also have a hobbyist station WHS40 which is affordable.
To get you started, look for a soldering iron
- with adjustable temperature
- easily changeable tips: very small for SMD parts, more coarse for THT parts and wires
- if available, l get an ESD safe iron
- >= 30 W
Which brand depends on where you can source the soldering iron.
Also get some solder wire with a flux core. From a health point of view lead-free is preferable, but leaded solder is easier to handle for the layman.
 

danadak

Feb 19, 2021
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I have a collection of analog scopes but first advice would be get a low
cost DSO with FFT. Their capability, both in measurement, and serial buss
decoding will serve you well. Later as you get into deep dive an analog
scope still useful, especially the ones with plugins that give you special
capabilities just by changing plugins. For example the Tektronix 7000
series. Its a bridge between analog and digital. Plugins like sampling to
10 Ghz, spectrum analyzers, high gain differential, multimeter, curve
tracer.....

Low cost DSO :


You will see on youtube and other forums they have had a number of firmware updates, and seem to
continue to do them. There is a version with signal generator, but I would recommend you later
pickup a DDS based generator, in range of [imath]60 -[/imath]80, as they have 50 ohm outputs, and wide range
voltage output, unlike the Hantek which is pretty limited. Also Siglent has a series, if you can catch a sale,
are good scopes. Rigol has a low end series, down to 50 Mhz but hackable to 100. I have one, used
it for ~ 6 years, and display crapped out. But really excellent scope. Lastly these manufacturers
typically have stores with open box and restored, significant savings.


Regards, Dana.
 
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Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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+1 :)
Analog O'scope layout or user interface can be easier to
understand more straightforward for beginner
in real time signal analysis on simple electronic circuit behavior.
You'll be using Rpi/Arduino Uno the DSO provides you digital
signal processing to capture and store multiple waveforms over time allowing you to analyze wave forms at your convenience and will allow you to conduct advanced experiments with your digital projects.
And as said before they are easier to acquire then analog scopes.
 

danadak

Feb 19, 2021
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Youtube, and vendors, support learning thru videos, as well as
contributed one off videos, on scopes and their usage. True for
both analog and digital scopes.

As always use the web for learning, very rewarding.

Digital scopes are a learning curve, but have features like auto setup to acquire and display a waveform to get one started.
They have many advanced triggering functions, where the learning is involved, but rewards awesome.
They have infinite persistence where one can look at noise in a meaningful way, like on a supply rail*,
and infrequent signal glitches presentation.
FFT (most) to give you frequency info, distortion, and emi issue work.
Some even have digital filters (like low end Rigol, usually only found on high end scopes)
that allow you to take a waveform sample and filter it for further insight.
Some now have Bode capability so you can evaluate frequency performance
(for the ones that dont you can use a noise source and FFT for that).
They also typically have rolling mode, think a strip chart recorder, where over
long periods of time you can log stuff like T, V, I......and see longer term
trends that would be otherwise impractical with any scope.


Regards, Dana.

* It will blow you away how noisy some supply rails can be, especially important
to address with modern processors and their onboard mixed signal features. Also
discipline you to bypass properly supply rails with right technology caps.....
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Minder

Apr 24, 2015
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Hard to find a good analog 200 MHz scope today. Comparatively inexpensive ones (with all the classic knobs etc.) from Fnirsi or Hantek or similar are easily obtainable and possibly even better accuracy-wise than an old analog scope.
I picked up a FNIRSI 1013D double beam, for general shop & portable use, quite nice for the price .

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