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Material science for electronics

kap

Jul 15, 2013
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Hi guys which is the best,basic & simple book for studying "Material science" in terms of going deeper into electronics ?
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
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What do you mean by "materials science"? Do you want to know how to design capacitors, resistors and semiconductors? This is totally unnecessary for circuit design, all you need to know is the behavior of the components. not how they work at a the level of physics. It is good to know something about semiconductors and how they work, but you can get this from basic electronics texts like the one mentioned in the post above.

Bob
 

kap

Jul 15, 2013
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What do you mean by "materials science"? Do you want to know how to design capacitors, resistors and semiconductors? This is totally unnecessary for circuit design, all you need to know is the behavior of the components. not how they work at a the level of physics. It is good to know something about semiconductors and how they work, but you can get this from basic electronics texts like the one mentioned in the post above.

Bob

Thank you Bob for the reply,

I saw online someone talking about capacitance of a straight wire, I was surprised because capacitance is result of facing two plates very near to each other, electrons and holes attract each other and they gather at the surface of two nearly held plates...

So a question came up in my mind that if "capacitance of a straight wire" is true then dose resistor has capacitance also because resistor is also a wire of semiconductor?

so I want to study at this level.

I hope what i said make sense to you.
 
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BobK

Jan 5, 2010
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That is not materials science. That is basic electronics. Stray capacitance and inductance do have to be taken into consideration when working at RF frequencies. Not so much otherwise.

Materials science would be about the properties of the materials that make up the parts. For example, in designing a power resistor, one might want to make sure the materials could hold up to the temparature expected when in operation. With capacitors, thermal expansion coefficients would be important since the capacitance depends on the size and shape of the elements.

Bob
 

gorgon

Jun 6, 2011
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I saw online someone talking about capacitance of a straight wire, I was surprised because capacitance is result of facing two plates very near to each other, electrons and holes attract each other and they gather at the surface of two nearly held plates...

So a question came up in my mind that if "capacitance of a straight wire" is true then dose resistor has capacitance also because resistor is also a wire of semiconductor?

so I want to study at this level.

I hope what i said make sense to you.


It did not make much sense to me, at least. If you are not trying to pull our collective legs here, I'll try to make an example.

You state that you have studied electronice for 6 months, but you did not tell at what level. Based on your questions so far, I'll assume that it is relative early in your education in electronics. Electronics, like any subject you want to learn, need to mature as you progress in your study. You need to start with the basic properties of the basic components, and gradually increase your knowledge from that base. The practical use of the components will eventually help you to expand the theoretical knowledge into a more or less useful practical experience. This is where you may start doing your own designs, based on proper knowledge. During this time you will experience that much of the existing designs and application notes from different manufacturers of electronic components, can be reused and/or used as 'platforms' for your own designs.
You don't need to invent the wheel every time you start a design.

Regarding the study of materials used in components, I would assume that you'll need a degree in physics, as a start. Then start in a research laboratory, at a company or facility researeching for new materials, if you get the security clearance.
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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Jan 21, 2010
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Remember when I said there are some things in datasheets that you very rarely need to consider important?

Well, the inductance of straight pieces of wire, or stray capacitance are examples of them.

Sure, if you're switching huge currents, or operating at very high frequencies (and we have members here who do work in these areas) then these things become important.

But for most of us they induce trivially small effects that we can almost always ignore.

Another example is that I am aware of the effect velocity has on mass, but as I drive around my city, it is not one of the things which I need to consider.
 
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