Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Microwave inverter project

Gabriell

Jan 17, 2016
2
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
2
Hey guys. I really hope someone can give me an answer here. I searched the internet, tried other forums but NOTHING! No-one knows the answer to my question....

I have a microwave inverter. I was hoping to turn it into a power supply ( 120v ). Is it possible to rewire the secondary coil and just connect it to 240v same as the old transformers( i did two already ) ? If not is there any other way to do it???

Please someone help!!!!
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,510
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,510
What is a microwave inverter?

google has a number of suggestions, but I want to be sure what you're talking about.
 

GPG

Sep 18, 2015
452
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
452
I think he means a switch mode supply
 

Gabriell

Jan 17, 2016
2
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
2
I mean this guy. Its like the old transformer but a lot lighter and smaller

image.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
Moderator
Jan 21, 2010
25,510
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
25,510
This is conjecture, but I suggest that this is a high frequency transformer. Connecting it directly to the mains would probably blow fuses or make a lot of smoke.
 

davenn

Moderator
Sep 5, 2009
14,242
Joined
Sep 5, 2009
Messages
14,242
agree with Steve

buy the correct transformer for your project :)



Dave
 

Alec_t

Jul 7, 2015
3,584
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
3,584
That's definitely a high frequency (many kHz) transformer so definitely can't be connected directly to mains (50/60Hz).
 

BobK

Jan 5, 2010
7,682
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Messages
7,682
And there are physical limits on how small and light a transformer for 50/60 Hz can be. They don't just make them big and heavy because they fell like it. This is because many windings are required to have enough inductance at low frequencies to overwhelm the resistance. And inductance depends on the size of the loop and the number of windings. For higher frequencies the inductance needed is much less, and hence the transformer can be much smaller and lighter.

In fact, this is the major difference between a simple transformer power supply and a switch mode power supply. The latter converts the power to a high frequency, runs it through a small transformer, then converts to DC. So the SMPS requires more electronics but less of a transformer to accomplish the same job.

Bob
 
Top