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Mitsubishi 27 inch vertical collapse

I have a several year old Mitsubishi 27407 27" TV.
It has collapsed the picture to a this vertical line.
I don't have the time to fix it (there's lots of
more fun projects I'm neglecting alread). What I
wonder is, is the current state of the TV repair
business such that I'd be better off junking it,
or would it be possible to get it repaired for a
reasonable sum (compared to just spending the bux
on a new set).

Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
 
I have a several year old Mitsubishi 27407 27" TV.
It has collapsed the picture to a this vertical line.
I don't have the time to fix it (there's lots of
more fun projects I'm neglecting alread). What I
wonder is, is the current state of the TV repair
business such that I'd be better off junking it,
or would it be possible to get it repaired for a
reasonable sum (compared to just spending the bux
on a new set).

Sorry, in the above previous message, I said
thin vertical line - I meant, thin horizontal line.

Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
 
K

kip

Jan 1, 1970
0
Chaeck for dry solder joints on Vertical out IC..

kip

va3mm
 
K

kip

Jan 1, 1970
0
If its not that check the V+ on the Vertical IC if its missing
follow the path back to the diode and resistor and replace all.
Would also be a good idea to replace the filter caps in the Vertical Circuit
as well.
The IC starts with LA7xxx or ANxxxx the location near the wires from the
Yoke.

kip
 
Lee K Gleason:
Obviously a failure in the vertical deflection.... could be a bad V
output chip or something as simple as cracked or dry solder connection
near and around that chip or the power resistors and other high heat
producing parts that supply B+ to that circuitry.
Either way... this repair usually is not very expensive and as long as
the television had an acceptably bright and good picture before the
failure then it certainly is worth fixing unless of course you have
extra bucks that you are wanting to spend.... so go ahead and junk it
and buy a new disposable television that most likely will NOT have the
build quality of your Mitz.
electricitym
- - - -
 
L

Lee K. Gleason

Jan 1, 1970
0
Lee K Gleason:
Obviously a failure in the vertical deflection.... could be a bad V
output chip or something as simple as cracked or dry solder connection
near and around that chip or the power resistors and other high heat
producing parts that supply B+ to that circuitry.
Either way... this repair usually is not very expensive and as long as
the television had an acceptably bright and good picture before the
failure then it certainly is worth fixing unless of course you have
extra bucks that you are wanting to spend.... so go ahead and junk it
and buy a new disposable television that most likely will NOT have the
build quality of your Mitz.
electricitym
Thanks to all for the technical pointers. I feel you're being a trifle
judgemental here...
if you could see my place and the collection of vintage electronics still
serving
here decades after they were built, you wouldn't assume I enjoy disposing of
gear that can be repaired and replaced with new low quality crap (I won't
bore
you with a list, but, suffice to say, there are numerous vacuum tubes
glowing in TVs
and radios, and computers built with 74xx logic still running here at my
place.
Heck, as we speak, I'm listening to a Grateful Dead bootleg reel to reel
tape
on my Pioneer RT-707)
I was just concerned that due to the collapsing of the TV repair biz, it
would
be impossibly expensive. Just this year, the best TV repair place in
northwest Houston
went out of business (All-Antenna), and I've seen lots of other shops
disappear.
I'm encouraged by your suggestion that it will be possible to have it
repaired
economically, since I'd hate to chuck it when, except for its current
problem,
obviously has many years of life left in it.

Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
Control-G Consultants
[email protected]
 
L

Leonard Caillouet

Jan 1, 1970
0
Lee K. Gleason said:
Thanks to all for the technical pointers. I feel you're being a trifle
judgemental here...
if you could see my place and the collection of vintage electronics still
serving
here decades after they were built, you wouldn't assume I enjoy disposing of
gear that can be repaired and replaced with new low quality crap (I won't
bore
you with a list, but, suffice to say, there are numerous vacuum tubes
glowing in TVs
and radios, and computers built with 74xx logic still running here at my
place.
Heck, as we speak, I'm listening to a Grateful Dead bootleg reel to reel
tape
on my Pioneer RT-707)
I was just concerned that due to the collapsing of the TV repair biz, it
would
be impossibly expensive. Just this year, the best TV repair place in
northwest Houston
went out of business (All-Antenna), and I've seen lots of other shops
disappear.
I'm encouraged by your suggestion that it will be possible to have it
repaired
economically, since I'd hate to chuck it when, except for its current
problem,
obviously has many years of life left in it.

Lee K. Gleason N5ZMR
Control-G Consultants
[email protected]

I have not seen a model number yet, and if you want specific info it is best
to put that in the subject line. Some Mitsubishi sets have extensive
capacitor leakage and the vertical problem may be the tip of the iceberg.
If it is one of those sets you could have as many as a few dozen bad caps.

Repair of the vertical circuit could be as simple as resoldering some bad
joints. You could also need to change caps in the vertical circuit, repair
corrosion damage, replace the output IC, and clean the board with solvent to
remove electrolyte.

Look over the board carefully. Leaky caps will have at least one of these
characteristics: a spot around them, a dark or corroded negative leg, black
corrosion damage on the traces, will sizzle when the leg is soldered, will
have a powdery look to the solder compared to the other joints, or will
smell like bad fish when the legs are soldered.

Leonard
 
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