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MOSFET Power module and gate drive connections guidance

mumartahir

Feb 22, 2024
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Hi, I have the following gate driver module ( EV1909-TL-00A) and MOSFET power module ( F4-15MR12W2M1_B76 ). I need guidance how to connect them and the connection schematic to drive the full bridge power module. The links to the datasheets are the following (I am also attaching the files):
and
I have a heat sink and will install both (the power module and gate driver board) on the heatsink. If you will provide me with a schematic and connection guidance to drive that module, I will highly thank full to you.
Best Regards:
Umar
 

Attachments

  • Power module.pdf
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  • Driver board.pdf
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Fish4Fun

So long, and Thanks for all the Fish!
Aug 27, 2013
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Hi mumartahir! Welcome to the forum!

I think you might be better off explaining what you are trying to achieve ... the mosfet module you linked is rated at 1200V/75A = 90kW, over twice the power available from a typical residential mains (220Vac x 200A ~ 44kW). The "Control Module" you linked states typical applications are:

APPLICATIONS
Wireless Charging
E-Cigarettes
Drones
Avionics DC/DC Converters
Active-Clamp Forward Converters

I cannot imagine a reason to connect these two devices ... It would be like connecting an F-1 Rocket engine to a moped.

Start by describing what you would like to achieve .... for instance a DC motor speed control, DC Motor Speed and Direction control ... from there detail the power source (ie battery, AC Mains, SWMPS etc, etc) and the power requirements of the motor, for instance is it a DC motor, induction motor, single phase AC, 3-phase AC, BLDC motor, stepper motor etc, etc. You should also include info about the ultimate use of the device ... for instance, if it is a toy car then the design is far less critical than if it is a motor for a piece of life-saving medical equipment, or a lift used by the public.

Hope it helps!

Fish
 

mumartahir

Feb 22, 2024
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Feb 22, 2024
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Hi Fish,

Thank you for your reply. I want to operate the Infineon module mentioned above as a full-bridge inverter for wireless power transfer application experiments. My desired specifications are about 100-300kHz, 100-600V, and 2-10A (which may slightly vary). I am not sure which gate driver board I should use with the MOSFET module. Could you please suggest a suitable gate drive module circuit that I can use for this operation?
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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Why do you want to use a half bridge driver for a full bridge. stick with infineon they make full bridge drivers. I can imagine exactly what you're doing. internal combustion engines are going to be obsolete you're thinking ahead especially with the price of petrol in India you guys are on the forefront.
A word of advice the topology you want to use is Resonant Parallel Series that is the capacitor for power factor correction would be in series. The efficiency of Resonant WPT depends on the quality factor of the transmitting and
receiving side and also depends on the effective coupling factor of the coil. But you see here in the United States they are encouraging and rewarding individuals with money for an effective design so that is as much guidance as I can give you without spilling the beans .good luck to you.
 

Fish4Fun

So long, and Thanks for all the Fish!
Aug 27, 2013
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Hi mumartahir!

The EV1909-TL-00A Board specifies bootstrap voltages up to 50V, to drive this module you will need a bootstrap voltage of Vdd + 15V, in your case 115V to 615V ... As stated previously, there is nothing useful to be gained by connecting these two devices.

A quick Digikey Search shows an Infineon 2ED21814S06JXUMA1 capable of +/-2.5A drive currents, BUT I don't think it is going to be fast enough for 300Khz operation, perhaps ~ 100Khz, you would need someone more familiar these voltages/frequencies to guide you

Onsemi shows a FAN7191 capable of 600V @ +/- 4.5A drive currents, but again with combined Tdon/off + Tr + Tf => 500nS it might not be fast enough for 300kHz.

I would suggest you contact Infineon and ask them for suggestions on the best driver for the F4-15MR12W2M1_B76 module at your desired frequencies and voltages ... you might also ask them about the most suitable driver module for your application ....

Regardless, you are going to need to narrow the voltage & frequency ranges if you want reasonable suggestions ... There are a lot of devices capable of 100khz operation at 100V, but 300khz at 600V is going to be considerably more exclusive AND expensive ... You might also consider doing experiments at lower voltages and currents (for example 30V/2A) to help you define your larger project parameters.

You state your project is "wireless power transfer application" ... You are aware how grossly inefficient wireless power transfer is? ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_power_transfer ) ... If you were switching 10A/600V @ 300khz the nominal input power would be 6kW assuming you could achieve this @75% efficiency your actual power consumption would be ~8kW.

In 2007 a team led by Marin Soljačić at MIT used two coupled tuned circuits each made of a 25 cm self-resonant coil of wire at 10 MHz to achieve the transmission of 60 W of power over a distance of 2 meters (6.6 ft) (8 times the coil diameter) at around 40% efficiency.

from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_power_transfer

Assuming you could achieve the 40% efficiency achieved by the MIT team, 6kW * 0.40 = 2.4kW --> Net efficiency 2.4/8 = 30% ... From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossi...ency for utility,(i.e. temperatures too low.)

Typical thermal efficiency for utility-scale electrical generators is around 37% for coal and oil-fired plants

Tesla was obsessed with trying to crack wireless power transfer; engineers have spent over a 100 years refining it and it has found commercial applications in things like RFID and Smart Cards, and most recently in "wireless" cell phone charging ... but these are very low-power applications ... the only "high power" applications I can think of are microwave ovens, and LASERs and both these applications typically transfer thermal energy, not electricity.

I would suggest you read the wikipedia link above carefully and make sure you fully understand what has already been done and the math that defines the parameters before you go too far down the wireless power transfer rabbit hole ... Regardless, consider my suggestion that you start with low voltage/current to establish the basic design, then you can worry about scaling it up to kilowatts.

Good Luck!

Fish
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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@mumartahir
It should be acknowledged that the (MIT) results although complete was outdated from the moment the results were written. Interesting new approaches to improve WPT are being researched.
I am biased on this subject because I'm a part of this research and innovations.
My motives are not purely for scientific achievement they are for monetary reasons.
A critical remark should be made regarding energy efficiency. It is clear that wireless charging technologies come with a penalty with respect to their wired counterparts. The higher the power one wants to transfer and the larger the distance to be bridged, the more considerable the losses are.
A personal scientific interest I have is in acoustic power transfer because it is the only
technology that is not EM-based, making it suitable for places where no EM waves are allowed,the fact that acoustic signals penetrate better through metal walls compared to the other WPT technologies, makes this a suitable solution in several situations in particularly where electromagnetic waves are not allowed.
Wireless Power Transfers go hand in hand with stronger fields, and of course, higher currents and voltages are present. The inverter at the transmitter side will therefore be a larger source of electrical-noise pollution for several reasons:
I have to deal with electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility…
The amount of transferred power can be controlled by adjusting the duty cycle of the PWM signal in the inverter. This change can result in the loss of zero voltage switching off the power switch and cause high voltage changes in time dv/dt. A changing magnetic and electric field is created, which carries the high dv/dt. The fields around conducting components cause common-mode currents to flow from the system to the environment and back via the mains. This results in conducted interference or, more precisely, common-mode interference.
Radiated EMI can be induced by switching large currents in the inverter, which cause large current changes in time di/dt. Radiated EMI can also be caused by the leakage field of the inductors, due to poor coupling between transmitter and receiver. All of this I must consider in submitting a design.
 

Fish4Fun

So long, and Thanks for all the Fish!
Aug 27, 2013
481
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@Delta Prime & acoustic power transfer ....

Had not even considered acoustic power transfer ... I assume you would be attempting to transfer power in the form of heat? Though I suppose a speaker and a microphone would constitute a real-world example of how acoustic waves could be used to transmit electrical power .... albeit at fairly low efficiency. Very interesting, thank you for sharing that!

Perhaps in a crystalline structure a resonant frequency might be transmitted great distances with very little loss? Perhaps even more efficiently than coherent light through glass ... ??

While we are thinking outside the box, your acoustic power transfer proposition made me think instantly about how gravity waves might be harnessed (obviously in regions of space where they are particularly strong ... from wikipedia: "Inspiraling binary neutron stars are predicted to be a powerful source of gravitational waves ....... the effects when measured on Earth are predicted to be very small, having strains of less than 1 part in 10^20"). Not sure how gravity waves might ever be of any practical importance, but it is interesting mind-candy to think how gravity waves might be converted into other types of (more useful) energy.

Good Luck!

Fish
 
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