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OBDII J1996/M connected to Ethernet (RJ45) pinout

Justrollen

Aug 29, 2018
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We own several OBD2 Scanners that attach to DB9,s.

A project we are doing requires us to pinout 2 OdbII (j1962/male) connectors to ethernet (RJ45).

I am trying to pinout the Obd2 to ethernet with no luck

anyone that can kindly assist us with the pinout for that?
Below is how we connected a DB9. ( FYI )eas_ecu_obdii.jpg
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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To what purpose? If all you're doing is extending the cable using different connectors then chose whatever cable colour and pin connection you prefer.

If you think you can connect the output of the ODBII to a 'network' you're wrong. You can't.
 

Justrollen

Aug 29, 2018
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I need to connect my 1998 Range Rover OBD2 with a EAS unlock software.

They sell OBD2 to DB9, USB and Ethernet, so we know its possible.

Are you familiar with this?
 

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Justrollen

Aug 29, 2018
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I thank you for your reply,
You make it sound simple to connect the wires together.

Sir,
it does not seem simple to me and I need to know which order to layout the rj45.
I am interested in pins 1,5,11,12 from the obd2 connecting to the RJ45 pins 1 through 8? and what order?
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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Show a drawing of the components you are trying to connect together, along with an explanation of what you are trying to do , rather than suggest ways to do whatever it is.
All you have shown is a standard "B" type network cable, an "A" type does the exact same thing.
What it will not do , as Kellyseye has told you already, is interface between serial, be it via db9 rs232 or usb to network.
The company you refer to may well have a type of interface but your change of cable type is not going to cut it.
 

Justrollen

Aug 29, 2018
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I am trying to make this cable,
My laptop does not have a DB9.
it will connect my 1998 range rover 4.6 HSE OBD2 to Rj45 so I can run EAS UNLOCK software

Does that help

th67DJC8V9.jpg
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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No - it doesn't help (you).

The 'fat' plug will contain interfacing electronics that convert the ODBII signal to ethernet. It's not a simple matter of 'attaching plugs/wiring' - you MUST have the conversion electronics.

There is no other way to do this.
 

Justrollen

Aug 29, 2018
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No - it doesn't help (you).

The 'fat' plug will contain interfacing electronics that convert the ODBII signal to ethernet. It's not a simple matter of 'attaching plugs/wiring' - you MUST have the conversion electronics.

There is no other way to do this.
Thank You for your quick responses & your Quote

Owning two 1998 P38 Land Rover Range Rovers my interest is personal.
After seeing this video on the below web site of his conversion to DB9, I started researching to rj5. ( my laptop has USB & ethernet).
https://www.rangerovers.net/repairdetails/airsuspension/faultclearsoftware.html

I did find the attached Can-Obd2 ( cAN is a company that sells scanners - so I'm figuring that its proprietary)

I own the actron AutoScanner Plus ( cut the cord to use connector- ahmm) and use the software from the above referenced website.

Ya know, I s=searched google and seen this connected, usb, rj45, odb2 extensions…

I understand there is protocols. the above referenced website figured it out to DB9 because that's what his laptop has, old dell.
Keep in mind this gentleman is p38 Range Rover specific. ( he sells the cable) knowing what pins he wants from the OBD2 and connecting them with the proper sequence of Tx and/or Rx pin seems DIY achievable.

I did pin out the odb2 and learned my AutoScanner Plus obd2 pin 1 is blank. That there started me on a desire to make and for surely share.

as for the "conversion electronics, I seen that with the USB conversion and so far not with a standard rj45 patch cable?

Yes I'm ready to give in and No I will not until I get this right,
your advice is Respected and Appreciated.
 

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  • OBD-ENET Cable Build - Detailed Instructions.pdf
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VenomBallistics

Aug 30, 2018
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well the internal circuitry thing has been stated .... OBD isnt that hard to understand its a sequence of pulses that count off digits for the most part ... " - - - - -" = 23 there is a sync pulse as well what you need is a microchip that will listen to the OBD jibberish, and turn it into Eithernet or USB babble which actually is similar in electronic principal but will be in the form of data bytes ... not a simple pulse count
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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If your original application used the db9 input on your pc and you no longer have a pc with this, there is a db9 to usb converter cable available that will give you a virtual rs232 connection.

Two things though, it's not enough just to connect an OBD cable, you need software to look at the info coming in and it has to be able to run on whatever version of windows etc. you are using.

The converter cable is available in many places, mouser, Ebay etc. BUT be sure to get a decent one as the elcheapo ones can be a pain to get going at best or not work at all at worst.
Good ones can be around $35 but I have had success with $10-$12 one as well....avoid the $4-$5 unless you know what you are doing .
Reason is there are a couple of different onboard converter chipsets available (FTDI and CH340 etc.) and the cloned ones of a particular type may not work with the original drivers.(FTDI)

http://www.portlandiacloudservices.com/usb-to-rs232-serial-port-adapters-clones-counterfeits/

Enter the clones and counterfeits
Today, manufacturers of new PC gear are very stingy with serial ports. The usual procedure is to only add them to some of the high-end business PC gear. Systems aimed for home use simply don’t have them. As a result, because of older PC’s disappearing, the need for USB to Serial converters has grown over the years and more companies have gotten involved in making the converter chips. Besides Phillips which I mentioned earlier, Atmel has produced the ATmega32U6 along with microcode to reprogram that chip to act as a USB to Serial converter, and Future Technology Devices Inc (FTDI) has produced the FT232 USB to UART chips and Texas Instruments has the TUSB3410 chip. TNanjing Ning has the CH340G and Silicon Labs chips the CP210x series, and Cypress has the Semi CY7C65213-28PVXI (this chip costs $6.80 per chip from Mouser Electronics). Increasingly, new technology has brought new uses of these converters as cell phone data transfer cables, accessing and programming network devices, (router “unbricking”) and to configure and program the Arduino prototyping and development boards.
This has given rise to USB Converter chips that are clones, and counterfeit. This issue is what the rest of this article focuses on.



When appropriate drivers are installed, your hardware section in control panel should show a new serial port.
Example cable........ http://www.picaxe.com/Software/Drivers/USB010-USB-Adapter-Driver/
 
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