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Overheating transformer.

T

TonyV

Jan 1, 1970
0
I am using a 50W (230V - 12V) transformer to drive a 5W halogen lamp.
It works fine but the transformer gets very hot after about 30 minutes or
so.

Can someone please explain to me why it overheats so quickly?
Should I perhaps use a lower Wattage transformer?

Thanks.
TonyV
South Africa
 
P

petrus bitbyter

Jan 1, 1970
0
TonyV said:
I am using a 50W (230V - 12V) transformer to drive a 5W halogen lamp.
It works fine but the transformer gets very hot after about 30 minutes or
so.

Can someone please explain to me why it overheats so quickly?
Should I perhaps use a lower Wattage transformer?

Thanks.
TonyV
South Africa

Tony,

Must be something wrong. Are you sure your numbers are correct? What's the
current rating of that transformer? It should be around 4A. BTW the power
rating of a transformer is usually given in VA, not in W. Assuming your
numbers are correct, the only thing I can imagine is bad insulation inside
the transformer. Does the transformer become hot when the lamp is
disconnected but the 230V is not?

petrus
 
I

Ian Stirling

Jan 1, 1970
0
TonyV said:
I am using a 50W (230V - 12V) transformer to drive a 5W halogen lamp.
It works fine but the transformer gets very hot after about 30 minutes or
so.

Can someone please explain to me why it overheats so quickly?
Should I perhaps use a lower Wattage transformer?

Assuming you are running the transformer at its design input voltage.
You can economise somewhat on the transformer design if you design
it so that it gets hot under no load.
Is it a particularly cheap unit made for use with lights?
 
TonyV said:
I am using a 50W (230V - 12V) transformer to drive a 5W halogen lamp.
It works fine but the transformer gets very hot after about 30 minutes or
so.

Can someone please explain to me why it overheats so quickly?
Should I perhaps use a lower Wattage transformer?

Thanks.
TonyV
South Africa

The more power it must pass, (watts) the bigger the transformer must
be (to avoid it getting hot).

The more iron (and copper) in it, the more power it can pass.

Rob
 
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