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Pavilion 560w MB w/bulging caps

tedstruk

Jan 7, 2012
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nichicon 3300uf 6.3v H0149 105 degree-- total of 9.

The computer has been acting up for quite some time. I had checked it about a year ago, and the caps didn't look that bad, maybe a bit bulgy..
So I let it run and yesturday....
no monitor.
huh.

IMG_20170325_152819450.jpg Where can I get some of these 6.3v 3300uf 105degree polarized ....?
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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Jan 21, 2010
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Is there any reason not to take your own advice?

I really hate to sat this stuff.
I have found from past experience that motherboards are extremely touchy when they fail. It is easier and less costly to replace the motherboard than to try and find a bad component. Most are assembled by robots and trying to second guess their circuits is futile and can lead to damage of more than just the motherboard. See what they cost. You might be suprised.
There's no reason not to try fixing this, the worst you'll do is wreck the motherboard and need a new one.

However, to fix this you need to be organised and be reasonably skilled with your equipment.

If you think you're up to it, then the steps are as follows:
  1. Determine which caps to replace. Note that you should replace all caps under stress, not just the leaky or swollen ones. Generally speaking, replace all of the same type as any that has leaked. If you have access to an ESR meter you can use it to check other caps that look ok but are on their way out.
  2. Note the orientation of every cap you're going to replace. The is no guarantee the polarity will be marked on the board.
  3. Note the value and voltage of every cap you're going to replace. This probably won't be marked on the board either. You don't want to find the several different values only after they're in a pile on your bench.
  4. Determine if the are any height restrictions in areas where these caps are. Also note where the diameter is critical (this is more frequent). If you can't get the same size for, you need ones that will fit.
  5. Remove one of each type of capacitor. Measure the spacing between the leads and note this down. You should now have all the basic electrical and physical specs for the caps.
  6. Search for replacement parts (RS, Digikey, Mouser, etc) and determine how much it will cost you. Remember that your looking for low ESR caps so check this and their role current ratings if you can. DO NOT even think about trying to purchase these from a pretend store like Radio Shack.
  7. Decide whether it is reasonable to repair.
So, do all those things and get back to us.
 
Last edited:

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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I have replaced parts like this before BUT the hurdles mentioned above made it a rather large task.
Sometimes success, other times not.
Not to mention removal of the suspect parts.
With the ground tracks being so large it is almost impossible to get sufficient heat into the pins to remove the parts.
All considered, I'd have to support Steve's first quote above.
 

tedstruk

Jan 7, 2012
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dubious of you steve. thanks for keeping me on track. I did an ebay search and found the exact match caps for a mear 10dollars. Well a lot of 10 anyway. I don't think I will find the same MOBO anywhere, its out of an HP Pavilion from the 90's, and after doing a MOBOcheck online, even if I found one, I would probably have to buy used, and I don't want to do that. I got this machine almost free, and I have another of the same model but different nums, that I bought new. It is still a Great machine. I should have known that something was wrong when I pushed the on button and it wouldn't turn on!!!

It did work for about 2 years. Now I will try to fix it. Hope It works. One question though...

If the caps that were installed blew for various reasons, and they are 6.3v would it be wrong to replace them with a higher rated... say 10v?
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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dubious of you steve.

I feel quite cromulent, thanks.

I did an ebay search and found the exact match caps for a mear 10dollars. Well a lot of 10 anyway.

Great. What are their specs like? What's the ESR quoted as being? What about the ripple current rating? Do you think those ratings will be sufficient? A mear [sic] $10 isn't cheap if they only last a month.

would it be wrong to replace them with a higher rated... say 10v?

No, as long as they fit.

Also, it looks like that PC could do with a bit of cleaning.
 

duke37

Jan 9, 2011
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I have an HP Pavillion which failed just after the guaranteed ended. HP wanted a large amount of money to mend it so I went to a local man who changed the mother board for a very reasonable price. He said "I know what that is, I have one upstairs which failed just after the guarantee ran out"

Just get a new board not made by HP.
 

tedstruk

Jan 7, 2012
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Wow.. ESR.
ESRFig3.jpg
Hey it would seem that maybe thos caps are using up some of the higher ripples on start up and if the volt rating was changed, it might effect the entire system with some of the ripples because they are burning up some of the current as they fail/and recover.

ESR... wow. So even super conductors are at question...
unless of course, you assume trust, and expect the engineers to follow protocol, and those 6.3v caps were put int there because they would work fine for long enough for the machine to become obsolete!!! Me? I think 10v caps would have been better!
maybe they were twice the price like, of couse the 4.99 6.3s I found on the bay and the counter part 9.99 10vs nearby....
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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We use English in this forum. I tried placing your post in Google translate but it couldn't determine what language you are using.

Can you please post using terms that make sense to those of us trying to help you.
 
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