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Resistors

R

Roger Dewhurst

Jan 1, 1970
0
Has anyone any ideas making resistors in the 1 ohm to 20 ohm range from
materials likely to be around the house somewhere?

R
 
J

John Fields

Jan 1, 1970
0
Has anyone any ideas making resistors in the 1 ohm to 20 ohm range from
materials likely to be around the house somewhere?
 
R

Roger Dewhurst

Jan 1, 1970
0
John Fields said:
On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 09:38:02 +1300, "Roger Dewhurst"
<[email protected]>
Tear apart a hair dryer or a toaster for the nichrome.

I do not have dud one lying around just at the moment.

Roger
 
J

JeffM

Jan 1, 1970
0
Roger said:
Has anyone any ideas making resistors in the 1 ohm to 20 ohm range
from materials likely to be around the house somewhere?

5" length of pencil lead ~15R.
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
Has anyone any ideas making resistors in the 1 ohm to 20 ohm range from
materials likely to be around the house somewhere?

R

Iron picture-hanger wire? Aluminum foil? Christmas tinsel (aluminum,
not mylar.) Light bulb filament? Copper wire from some transformer or
motor? Telephone wire?

Rip apart an old radio or computer or TV?

John
 
H

Homer J Simpson

Jan 1, 1970
0
Has anyone any ideas making resistors in the 1 ohm to 20 ohm range from
materials likely to be around the house somewhere?

Why would you want to? Wattage? Voltage?


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R

Roger Dewhurst

Jan 1, 1970
0
Homer J Simpson said:
Why would you want to? Wattage? Voltage?

To mimic a flat 12 volt lead acid battery. Say 25 watts. 12 volts, more or
less.

R
 
B

Bob Masta

Jan 1, 1970
0
To mimic a flat 12 volt lead acid battery. Say 25 watts. 12 volts, more or
less.

If you are just looking for a dummy load that can handle some
power, consider wiring up a parallel array of whatever resistor
value is available to get the target R, then immerse the array
in liquid.... water will be fine in this case, oil in general. The
liquid provides good heat transfer, and if you have a big-enough
volume you can run the load for a while before the liquid heats
up too much. This trick won't work for continuous duty, but
you probably don't need that, I'm guessing.

In the "olden days" there were construction articles in
Popular Electronics that used this general approach
to make a high-power dummy load for transmitters.
They housed the whole works in a gallon paint can
filled with oil.

Best regards,


Bob Masta

D A Q A R T A
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
www.daqarta.com
Scope, Spectrum, Spectrogram, Signal Generator
Science with your sound card!
 
J

John Fields

Jan 1, 1970
0
In the "olden days" there were construction articles in
Popular Electronics that used this general approach
to make a high-power dummy load for transmitters.
They housed the whole works in a gallon paint can
filled with oil.
 
G

George Jaynes

Jan 1, 1970
0
Steel rebar wire. You can buy a 100' roll for a couple of dollars at
hardware stores and construction rental stores. Wrap it around a pencil
until you get the resistance you want. It will heat up a great deal if
enough current is present, so plan on the oil bath cooling or comeup with a
way to keep pouring cold water over it.
 
H

Homer J Simpson

Jan 1, 1970
0
To mimic a flat 12 volt lead acid battery. Say 25 watts. 12 volts, more
or
less.

I hand built a resistor motor starter once using electric radiator elements.
Try an appliance parts store - they may have broken ones for free.


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