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Should I trash my UPS?

perseid

Mar 21, 2013
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Hi all, I bought a brand new Cyberpower UPS in the USA. It's rated for 110v 60Hz. Where I am the current is 220v 50Hz. I use a 220v/110v transformer for all USA devices and they all work fine. Plugged the UPS into the transformer and it won't power on. Called Cyberpower, they told me that the UPS will only work with 60Hz frequency. Is there anything I can do before it finds its way to the trash? A 60 to 50Hz converter? Modify the UPS to have it accept 50Hz? Thanks for any ideas.
 

Gryd3

Jun 25, 2014
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Hi all, I bought a brand new Cyberpower UPS in the USA. It's rated for 110v 60Hz. Where I am the current is 220v 50Hz. I use a 220v/110v transformer for all USA devices and they all work fine. Plugged the UPS into the transformer and it won't power on. Called Cyberpower, they told me that the UPS will only work with 60Hz frequency. Is there anything I can do before it finds its way to the trash? A 60 to 50Hz converter? Modify the UPS to have it accept 50Hz? Thanks for any ideas.
Well.. At the very least, you should look and see if that particular company even sells things outside of the US..
If so, there is a chance that there is a small switch or simple modification inside the UPS that will let you reconfigure it for 220V @50Hz.
If not, you are most likely out of luck.
(I'm relying on the manufacturer cutting costs during production. It's common to design one board that can be used universally, and simply put a different part on it or solder on a jumper based on where the product is intended to shop to. If this is the case, you need to inspect the board and see if anything is labelled.)
 

perseid

Mar 21, 2013
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Well.. At the very least, you should look and see if that particular company even sells things outside of the US..
If so, there is a chance that there is a small switch or simple modification inside the UPS that will let you reconfigure it for 220V @50Hz.
If not, you are most likely out of luck.
(I'm relying on the manufacturer cutting costs during production. It's common to design one board that can be used universally, and simply put a different part on it or solder on a jumper based on where the product is intended to shop to. If this is the case, you need to inspect the board and see if anything is labelled.)
I called Cyberpower, they told me that it's not an internal board or component that can be replaced to have the unit accept 50Hz, it's the whole unit that's designed for 60Hz and tha can't be changed. Frequency converters (50 t0 60 Hz) are worth thousands of dollars, many dozen times more than what this UPS cost me. I found interesting how this guy converted 50Hz to 60Hz:
 

Gryd3

Jun 25, 2014
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I called Cyberpower, they told me that it's not an internal board or component that can be replaced to have the unit accept 50Hz, it's the whole unit that's designed for 60Hz and tha can't be changed. Frequency converters (50 t0 60 Hz) are worth thousands of dollars, many dozen times more than what this UPS cost me. I found interesting how this guy converted 50Hz to 60Hz:
Well. did you talk to an engineer or Tier 1 support? Many support agents don't know the product very well aside from basic use and care. No company in their right mind would tell a consumer to open their product to switch a lead on the transformer or change a jumper. It's not meant to be taken apart by consumers, and no support agent ever for that company will encourage you to do so. I would be incredibly surprised if any of the support people you have talked to has ever replaced the battery in a UPS.
(I've worked in a call center for HP/Compaq... I know PCs and enjoy working with them, but had very strict instructions to follow this 'guide' we were given. The first step was always to wipe the customer's computer... I hated erasing all their stuff, and knew I could fix the problem another way...)
 

perseid

Mar 21, 2013
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Yes I know, most Tech Support guys are not knowledgeable, but I tried contacting local technicians and none has a clue as to how to fix this, they all tell me it can't be done. I'm sure there is an electrical engineer somewhere that would be able to adapt the unit for 50Hz compatibility. The principle exposed by that youtube guy of using an AC/DC and then an inverter sounds promising.
 

Gryd3

Jun 25, 2014
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Yes I know, most Tech Support guys are not knowledgeable, but I tried contacting local technicians and none has a clue as to how to fix this, they all tell me it can't be done. I'm sure there is an electrical engineer somewhere that would be able to adapt the unit for 50Hz compatibility. The principle exposed by that youtube guy of using an AC/DC and then an inverter sounds promising.
Using an AC-DC then an inverter would work... but I would urge you to look carefully on the board first. You don't have to change anything. Just observe and take notes/pictures. It will cost you nothing except a little time. Otherwise you can buy more equipment, but wont it bother you not knowing if 2 minutes with a soldering iron to change a jumper would have resolved your issue?
 

perseid

Mar 21, 2013
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The Cyberpower rep told me there's no board inside (I highly doubt this as there's a USB port, etc), and anyway, I have no experience with soldering or mobo repair, I'd have to take it to a technician to do it. The unit cost me $125, I doubt I can get a solution for less than that, maybe I'm better off buying another one with the right AC requirements. Also, there's a big warning on the outside of the unit saying that opening the unit can be hazardous as there is high voltage components.
 

davenn

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Sep 5, 2009
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maybe I'm better off buying another one with the right AC requirements.

in the long run, probably the best plan

Also, there's a big warning on the outside of the unit saying that opening the unit can be hazardous as there is high voltage components.

yup, well that is standard for something that has mains voltage going into it ;)

Dave
 

perseid

Mar 21, 2013
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in the long run, probably the best plan



yup, well that is standard for something that has mains voltage going into it ;)

Dave
The warning stated that it's hazardous to open the unit even if unplugged from the AC outlet, meaning that the unit itself has high voltage without any external AC feeding it.
 

Gryd3

Jun 25, 2014
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The warning stated that it's hazardous to open the unit even if unplugged from the AC outlet, meaning that the unit itself has high voltage without any external AC feeding it.
You are absolutely correct. It will store and generate high voltages. I was unaware of you lack of experiences and should have covered that first and foremost before recommending opening the unit.
While I stand firm that observing the board is the ideal first move, paying a technician to do so is not cost effective, and risking your skin to 'learn' on this device is not worth it. Good call, thank you for knowing your limits, and sorry for encouraging you so soon without confirming your skillset.

As an aside, the AC-DC adaptor and Inverter suggestion mentioned previously, you might as well chop out the middle man and make your own UPS then :p 12 or 24V Charger connected to Lead-Acid battery, + Battery connected to Inverter. You know have a UPS, no need to power that UPS if your contraption is just a battery away from being one anyway. In any case, you have lots of options.
 
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