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Steinberg UR44 Audio Interface No Power

Young_Silent_Made_IT

Dec 8, 2023
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I have a Steinberg UR44 audio interface that I had in storage for a few years, and now that I want to use it doesn't power on. I want to take this opportunity to learn electronics repair so I am trying to repair it for learning experience.

I am looking for guidance on how to proceed with troubleshooting the problem.

I have checked the original power supply with a multi meter and it works.

I visually inspected the PCB board and don't see any issues, except what looks like a possible broken fuse but not sure. I checked it for continuity it reads 97 ohms, but 3 components that light up for a split second when I press the power button on the audio interface when I inspect the PCB board with a thermal camera.





This pictures shows where the power jack is(blue circle), which is right next to the power button, and the barely visible green square shows the area where the 3 components are heating up/lighting up for a split second when inspected with the thermal camera.



I am new to electronics repair, how should I proceed from here in troubleshooting the problem?

Thanks for the help.
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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Quite a complex piece of equipment for a beginner to even consider "fixing".
Thermal camera images are rarely (if ever) used to diagnose pcb problems.

Could be a dry joint somewhere in the area you point to but one needs to have considerable skills just to inspect and reflow those joints on that type of pcb.
 

Harald Kapp

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Nov 17, 2011
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a Steinberg UR44 audio interface that I had in storage for a few years
How many years? Electrolytic capacitors tend to break down with time even when not used.

Judging from teh indictor seen in the image there seems to be a switch mode voltage regulator. If the output capacitor of this regulator has lost capacity, the regulator will draw too much current. Your thermal image corroborates this as the components in this area get hot. Then possibly a fail-safe mechanism jumps in and turns the regulator off.

Replace this capacitor:
1702299413457.png

And while you're at it you may replace the other electrolytic capacitors, too. Just to be on the safe side.

Of course, should you have an ESR meter you can check the capacitors before replacing them. If not: these caps are not very expensive.
You don't have to get the exact same type. What you need:
- same capacitance (typically a few hundred or thousand microfarad, see print on the caps.
- same of higher voltage, see also print on the caps
- same pin spacing - especially for the surface mount types.
- preferably low-ESR types
 

Young_Silent_Made_IT

Dec 8, 2023
2
Joined
Dec 8, 2023
Messages
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How many years? Electrolytic capacitors tend to break down with time even when not used.

Judging from teh indictor seen in the image there seems to be a switch mode voltage regulator. If the output capacitor of this regulator has lost capacity, the regulator will draw too much current. Your thermal image corroborates this as the components in this area get hot. Then possibly a fail-safe mechanism jumps in and turns the regulator off.

Replace this capacitor:
View attachment 62092

And while you're at it you may replace the other electrolytic capacitors, too. Just to be on the safe side.

Of course, should you have an ESR meter you can check the capacitors before replacing them. If not: these caps are not very expensive.
You don't have to get the exact same type. What you need:
- same capacitance (typically a few hundred or thousand microfarad, see print on the caps.
- same of higher voltage, see also print on the caps
- same pin spacing - especially for the surface mount types.
- preferably low-ESR types
Sorry for the late reply, but thanks for that detailed reply. I am doing some research on which ESR meter to order.
 
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