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Subsituting USB power for Battery?

I've got a battery powered peripheral (FM Transmitter) that I'd like to power
from USB.

I know that USB puts out 5v, and that a "Double A" batter puts out 1.2 v,
and assume that two would put out the same.

Can anyone point me in the right direction to make my little project? I
have a soldering gun, and can use it, but need an idea of what kind of parts
to put in between.

Also, is there any danger that dicking around with a USB cable like this
could cause corruption elsewhere in the USB bus?


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..............................................................................

"After we become a strong force as the result of the creation of the state,
we shall abolish partition and expand to the whole of Palestine. "

- Isreali founding father David Ben-Gurion

..............................................................................
[email protected] http://www.memeticcandiru.com
 
P

Pham Nuwen

Jan 1, 1970
0
h1dd3n_h4m$7[email protected] said:
I've got a battery powered peripheral (FM Transmitter) that I'd like to power
from USB.

I know that USB puts out 5v, and that a "Double A" batter puts out 1.2 v,
and assume that two would put out the same.

Depends if the batteries are in series or parallel. if they are in
parallel they still put out 1.2v but can produce more current. If they
are in series then they will put out 2.4v.
Can anyone point me in the right direction to make my little project? I
have a soldering gun, and can use it, but need an idea of what kind of parts
to put in between.

http://www.starmount.co.uk/s_usbpin.htm

Well to start here is the USB pinout:

"
Pin Name Description Cable Colour
1 Vcc +5V DC Red
2 D- Data - White
3 D+ Data + Green
4 Gnd Ground Black

Low power, bus-powered function Draw 100 mA (max)
"

(your can't actually trust those colors listed, but they might be right)

Basically you want to use a few resistors so we go to good ol' ohms law..

5v
----- = 50 ohms
100mA

so you want to ideally keep this down to 50 ohms total. It just so
happens 12 ohms aren't the hardest resistors in the world to find.

12 ohms X 100mA = 1.2v (or 1.25v in reality)
(3x12 ohms) X 100mA = 3.6v (or 3.75v in reality)

double check the math.... so here is your circuit (excuse the crude drawing)

5v + pin 1 ---+[ 12 ohm ]++[ 12 ohm ]++[ 12 ohm ]+---- 1.2v+
|
|
|
GND - pin 4 ----------+[ 12 ohm ]+--------------+
|
+------------------------------- GND -
Also, is there any danger that dicking around with a USB cable like this
could cause corruption elsewhere in the USB bus?

While it is possible, I doubt you could do a lot of serious harm, still
I'd unplug your other usb devices until you tested this and are happy
with it. Worst you could do is reverse pin 1 and 4 and possible harm the
"battery" driven device, or short circuit 1 and 4 in which case you
might cause your computer power supply to trip into short circuit mode.
Still it isn't like you are playing with high voltage here.

Lemme know how it goes, this isn't a bad idea, and could be a useful
little cable to have kicking around.
 
R

Randa

Jan 1, 1970
0
I've got a battery powered peripheral (FM Transmitter) that I'd like
to power from USB.

I know that USB puts out 5v, and that a "Double A" batter puts out
1.2 v, and assume that two would put out the same.

Can anyone point me in the right direction to make my little project?
I have a soldering gun, and can use it, but need an idea of what kind
of parts to put in between.

Also, is there any danger that dicking around with a USB cable like
this could cause corruption elsewhere in the USB bus?

You can overload the current capabilities of the USB bus on your
motherboard and potentialy damage your board. One of the things
you should determine before you get too excited is what the
current requirements are for the FM transmitter. Then add in your
other USB devices and see what your motherboard is willing to
support.

Now you know why there are active (powered) and passive(USB cable
powered) USB external hubs.
 
B

Bryan Heit

Jan 1, 1970
0
I have an FM transmitter which can run from either USB or a separate
battery pack. Batterypack takes 2-AAA batteries. If they can make it
work you can too, although I imagine some sort of a voltage control
board may be required.

Bryan
 
Y

Your Mom

Jan 1, 1970
0
Try using a Voltage REGULATOR, it REGULATES the VOLATGE, mexicans use them
due to new volatage regulations stipulated by the USA government. Ok now
read this, as long as you are a white person that can read of course. If
your mexican you will be expected to know this already.

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/V/voltage_regulator.html

IT"S LIKE A DICTIONARY BUT WITH OUT ALL THE ENGLISH!!!!!

THEY HAVE the good volatge regualtors at the action electronicsm, and that
other MEXICAN guy was right bout the current you gotta make sure you have
the same RESISTANCE, liek how MEXICANS resist working at WAL MART. So you
will liekly need a meter, but that is Eroupoean so your proably going to
spend way to much fucking time wiht this seemingly retarded project unless
you want'ed to learn more about the mexicans and their power
struggels!!!!!!!
 
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