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Surge Protection for Circuit

bobdxcool

Mar 9, 2012
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I am building a liquid dispenser system comprised of arduino, dc motor (6V 200mA), 2n2222 transistor, float switch. All these are powered by a regular 5V 1A DC adapter (off the shelf). Do the DC adapters ( made in china) offer surge protection ? If not, how I do implement surge protection ?
I already have a 250V 1amp glass fuse and IN4001 connected (to prevent circuit damage due to reverse polarity connection of adapter) as per the image attached below. (Adapter +ve and -ve connected to P5 screw connector pins 1 and 2).


Capture.PNG
 

Harald Kapp

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What kind of surge are you considering?
Usually surge is used in conjunction with mains power.
Do the DC adapters ( made in china) offer surge protection ?
In theory yes, but not all makes are equal. The cheap ones probably don't have surge protection. It depends on the specific adapter you use. You'll find this either in the technical data or you'd have to open the device to have a look inside.
If not, how I do implement surge protection ?
I'm afraid there is no simple answer to that question. Which surge level do you want to withstand? What do you accept in case of a surge event? A blown fuse? Or would you be willing to replace more components?
Google "surge suppression circuit" to get an impression of the wide range of possible circuits.

Probably the best idea is to use a surge suppresion adapter.

Your schematic, however, shows the secondary side of the power supply. What kind of surge do you expect there?
 

bertus

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Nov 8, 2019
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Hello,

The shown circuit could be a reverse polarity protection.
When the wrong polarity is connected the diode will conduct and the fuse will be lown.

Bertus
 

bobdxcool

Mar 9, 2012
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What kind of surge are you considering?
Usually surge is used in conjunction with mains power.

In theory yes, but not all makes are equal. The cheap ones probably don't have surge protection. It depends on the specific adapter you use. You'll find this either in the technical data or you'd have to open the device to have a look inside.

I'm afraid there is no simple answer to that question. Which surge level do you want to withstand? What do you accept in case of a surge event? A blown fuse? Or would you be willing to replace more components?
Google "surge suppression circuit" to get an impression of the wide range of possible circuits.

Probably the best idea is to use a surge suppresion adapter.

Your schematic, however, shows the secondary side of the power supply. What kind of surge do you expect there?
I was referring to the kind of surges on the AC lines which could damage the adapter and in turn the DC circuitry. Is that possible ?
 

davenn

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I was referring to the kind of surges on the AC lines which could damage the adapter and in turn the DC circuitry. Is that possible ?


yes, they are readily available for purchase
do some googling :)
 

Harald Kapp

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There's a link to suitable adapters in my post #2.
 
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