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Theoretical limit for loud music??

  • Thread starter martin griffith
  • Start date
A

Active8

Jan 1, 1970
0
Good grief, it does! Cool blue-and-white circular slide rule, with one
scale calibrated in deaths. And a scale for "probability of a glass
fragment penetrating 1 cm of soft tissue." Creepy.

Mine's either clear, white, and green or (clear or white) and green.
You dial in the yeild and range and it has a window for biological
effects, structural damage, crater dimensions (including the height
and delta R of the debris around the edge of the crater) and a bunch
of other stuff like radiation levels.
 
M

Mark Fergerson

Jan 1, 1970
0
John said:
Ted Taylor ("The Curve of Binding Energy") designed a lot of nukes,
including the biggest fission bomb and the only known bomb design that
wouldn't go off.

Yet another Urban Legend dispelled? AIUI no bomb test ever failed
(even if some had to be pushed a bit, Mythbusters style).

Got more info on the recalcitrant design?

Mark L. Fergerson
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
Yet another Urban Legend dispelled? AIUI no bomb test ever failed
(even if some had to be pushed a bit, Mythbusters style).

Got more info on the recalcitrant design?

It's in his book somewhere; no index, so I can't find the reference
easily. ABLE misfired in October of 1951, but I'm not sure that's the
one he takes "credit" for.

In the CD set I mentioned, there's a section on an h-bomb that
misfired on the tip of a Pacific atoll, strewing plutonium shards all
over the place.

I've read that any nuclear bomb has a significant chance of fizzling,
a consequance of neutron multiplication statistics. The typical
fission blast depends on something like 5 to 10 neutrons being emitted
by the initiator within the critical time window. I understand the
fizzle probability may typically be in the low per-cents range.

John
 
K

Ken Taylor

Jan 1, 1970
0
John Larkin said:
It's in his book somewhere; no index, so I can't find the reference
easily. ABLE misfired in October of 1951, but I'm not sure that's the
one he takes "credit" for.

In the CD set I mentioned, there's a section on an h-bomb that
misfired on the tip of a Pacific atoll, strewing plutonium shards all
over the place.

I've read that any nuclear bomb has a significant chance of fizzling,
a consequance of neutron multiplication statistics. The typical
fission blast depends on something like 5 to 10 neutrons being emitted
by the initiator within the critical time window. I understand the
fizzle probability may typically be in the low per-cents range.

John
I think there's a reference to the 'fizzlers' in "The Atomic Bomb Movie". I
certainly remember it being discussed a long while ago - we were wondering
how you'd select the guy to go check just what went wrong at the coal-face!
:)

Ken
 
B

Ban

Jan 1, 1970
0
Rich said:
This brings to mind a little video snippet I saw at the St. Paul, MN
Science Museum, shortly after Mt. St. Helens went up. It was a
satellite video of the "event." There was a visible circle that
expanded from ground zero so fast that it went across two states in
about a second.
I wonder if that was real-time, in which case the shock wave was going
about a thousand miles a second, or it was way slowed down. I assume
that the shock wave was visible from condensation of some kind - in
the famous ocean test where the ships look like toys, you can see
the shock wave go through the cloud layer, very fast.

But I think that might not qualify as "sound".

Rich,
even a shock wave cannot disable the laws of sound propagation and will move
with 344m/s(temp. and humidity dependent) which is around 1250km/h or
750mph.
 
D

Don Pearce

Jan 1, 1970
0
Rich,
even a shock wave cannot disable the laws of sound propagation and will move
with 344m/s(temp. and humidity dependent) which is around 1250km/h or
750mph.

This is not entirely true. A shock wave can be highly compressed, and
in that state the speed of sound rises considerably - the air
molecules are far more tightly bound to each other locally. So in the
immediate vicinity of a large over-opressure, the speed of the shock
wave can be very high.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
 
C

Clifford Heath

Jan 1, 1970
0
Ban said:
even a shock wave cannot disable the laws of sound propagation and will move
with 344m/s(temp. and humidity dependent) which is around 1250km/h or
750mph.

That would be true if air was an ideal gas, but in fact the atoms
have a finite diameter, so at a certain pressure you get something
like a shell of liquified air, which has a *much* higher stiffness
than gaseous air, and consequently much higher SoS.
 
K

Ken Smith

Jan 1, 1970
0
Ban said:
Rich,
even a shock wave cannot disable the laws of sound propagation and will move
with 344m/s(temp. and humidity dependent) which is around 1250km/h or
750mph.

This speed only applies when the pressure created is not large. If you
set off a high exposive, the shockwave travels much faster than the speed
of sound. Imagine a cylinder with an open top and a piston coming up
from the bottom. If the piston is traveling at 3 times the speed of
sound, the shock wave must also be traveling at that speed or the
atoms of the air will end up inside the piston.
 
F

Frithiof Andreas Jensen

Jan 1, 1970
0
Rich Grise said:
John Woodgate wrote:

Apparently there *is* a limit - or maybe Darwin is against boom-box cars:

http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/short/59/8/722

"Music: a new cause of primary spontaneous pneumothorax
M Noppen1, S Verbanck1, J Harvey2, R Van Herreweghe1, M Meysman1, W Vincken1
and M Paiva3"

"Exposure to loud music should be included as a precipitating factor in the
history of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax."
 
J

John Larkin

Jan 1, 1970
0
Apparently there *is* a limit - or maybe Darwin is against boom-box cars:

http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/short/59/8/722

"Music: a new cause of primary spontaneous pneumothorax
M Noppen1, S Verbanck1, J Harvey2, R Van Herreweghe1, M Meysman1, W Vincken1
and M Paiva3"

"Exposure to loud music should be included as a precipitating factor in the
history of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax."

Gosh, thank you. That's really good news.

John
 
J

John Woodgate

Jan 1, 1970
0
I read in sci.electronics.design that John Larkin <jjlarkin@highSNIPland
THIStechPLEASEnology.com> wrote (in <tjduj0lr8l4le1qqtob5bi2ndnell1d3lu@
4ax.com>) about 'Theoretical limit for loud music??', on Wed, 8 Sep
2004:
Gosh, thank you. That's really good news.

If you follow the thread back, you'll also find it's old news. Groundhog
effect.
 
A

Active8

Jan 1, 1970
0
No, but I've heard that somebody proposed a laser to blind enemy soldiers
and pilots, but it was disallowed because it's inhumane or something.

Yes. It's much more humane to have an M-16 round bounce around
inside your leg or whatever rendering it useless for life. Or have
it rip hell out of your thorax.
I've heard that your anus resonates at about 50-60 HZ,

Mine sometimes goes higher. Sometimes it's silent which might mean
ultrasonic.
and when it's
resonating, you can lose bowel control, which could be pretty humorous
crowd control. I've also heard that smashing a little vial of butyric
acid will make people start to puke, since it's essence of puke, and
you can get a chain reaction.
I heard the German Politzei have a puke gas for crowd control. Maybe
that's the same stuff.
 
J

Jim Thompson

Jan 1, 1970
0
On Tue, 07 Sep 2004 02:46:45 GMT, Rich Grise wrote:
[snip
I've heard that your anus resonates at about 50-60 HZ,

Mine sometimes goes higher. Sometimes it's silent which might mean
ultrasonic.
[snip]

Tight ass ;-)

...Jim Thompson
 
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