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troubleshooting method for micro-controller board ?

R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
robb said:
i have a micro-controller board with 3 big 40DIP ICs, 10 or so 16
DIP support ICs. with 32v/8v/5v transformer supply

i believe the 32v shorted with 5V line

So....where does one start to diagnose such a *big* problem ?

I can only work on this in short segments of time and am usually
tired ... so i am moving backwards.

Anyway the revisit.

The last diagnostic consensus was to remove voltage regulators
and inject a good 5v power into the 5v lines and look for
warming components to get a fix on problems to repair.

Since my 5.2V *aged* lantern battery power supply did not impress
many i cobbled a simple 5v power supply from a 18 VAC/2.5A wall
wart, a 100V/1.5A bridge and 7805 5V regulator plus some
resitors and a 6V bulb to test.

I connected the 5v (through 450 Ohm) to the PCB 5v and 0v lines.
i measured ~60 mA curent nothing warmed ...i idecremented the
resistance by 100 for each iteration of testing the measured
currernt increased slightly until i made it to (100 Ohms) and
then the current spiked to ~+ 1.5A and the 7805 fried ?

but still no heat on the board anywhere, no trace no component no
IC ?

do i need to do something different with power supply test ?
thanks for any help,
robb
 
A

Arfa Daily

Jan 1, 1970
0
robb said:
I can only work on this in short segments of time and am usually
tired ... so i am moving backwards.

Anyway the revisit.

The last diagnostic consensus was to remove voltage regulators
and inject a good 5v power into the 5v lines and look for
warming components to get a fix on problems to repair.

Since my 5.2V *aged* lantern battery power supply did not impress
many i cobbled a simple 5v power supply from a 18 VAC/2.5A wall
wart, a 100V/1.5A bridge and 7805 5V regulator plus some
resitors and a 6V bulb to test.

I connected the 5v (through 450 Ohm) to the PCB 5v and 0v lines.
i measured ~60 mA curent nothing warmed ...i idecremented the
resistance by 100 for each iteration of testing the measured
currernt increased slightly until i made it to (100 Ohms) and
then the current spiked to ~+ 1.5A and the 7805 fried ?

but still no heat on the board anywhere, no trace no component no
IC ?

do i need to do something different with power supply test ?
thanks for any help,
robb
Do you mean that the 7805 got hot and shut down ? One of those should never
"fry", because they are SOA protected. I suspect that something else
happened there, because if you do the math, it is impossible for 1.5 amps to
flow through a 100 ohm resistor, with only 5v driving it ... Apart from
that, most variations of the 7805 are only rated to 1 amp, although there
are exceptions.

When you cobbled together your test supply, did you mount the regulator on a
heatsink, and most importantly, did you place a 4u7 cap, paralleled with a
0u1 cap directly across the output and ground pins of the regulator, as
close to the device as you could get them? This is *very* important, to
prevent the regulator bursting into vicious ultrasonic or higher
oscillation. It may be just that you reached a current level where this
happened, and the meter didn't know what to do with what it was measuring,
so just displayed some meaningless nonsense. These regs do get very hot when
they oscillate. Although not strictly necessary, it's considered good 'belt
and braces' to put a 0u1 cap between input and ground pins as well.

The more I think about the 'problem' that this board has, the more non
'real-world' it seems. I can't really see any reason why three unrelated
fuses, on three unrelated rails, should have blown, unless there was a
serious and easily visible problem. The only thing that did occur to me was
input voltage. You're not by any chance firing the thing up on UK 240v
power, and its transformer is actually rated for 100 or 110v ? That would do
it ...

Arfa
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
Arfa Daily said:
Do you mean that the 7805 got hot and shut down ? One of those should never
"fry", because they are SOA protected. I suspect that something else
happened there, because if you do the math, it is impossible for 1.5 amps to
flow through a 100 ohm resistor, with only 5v driving it ... Apart from
that, most variations of the 7805 are only rated to 1 amp, although there
are exceptions.

Thanks for help Arfa,
I am describing from memory, the last thing i recall was
decrement too the 100 Ohm resistor and the amp meter's numbers
were jumping around and 1.5 is the largest number i caught with
my eye.

as for fried 7805 ... the 100 ohm resistor started to smoke and i
think i saw the 7805 let out a puff of smoke and now the 7805
does not produce output ? so i assumed it was fried

this all happened very quickly
When you cobbled together your test supply, did you mount the regulator on a
heatsink,
the pcb i took it from had a small flat square of aluminum bolted
to it 1.5cm x 1.5cm x 1 mm
and most importantly, did you place a 4u7 cap, paralleled with a
0u1 cap directly across the output and ground pins of the regulator, as
close to the device as you could get them?
no


This is *very* important, to prevent the regulator bursting
into vicious ultrasonic or higher oscillation.
uh-oh,

It may be just that you reached a current level where this
happened, and the meter didn't know what to do with what it was measuring,
so just displayed some meaningless nonsense. These regs do get very hot when
they oscillate. Although not strictly necessary, it's considered good 'belt
and braces' to put a 0u1 cap between input and ground pins as well.
i'll try the test again with those mods
The more I think about the 'problem' that this board has, the more non
'real-world' it seems. I can't really see any reason why three unrelated
fuses, on three unrelated rails, should have blown, unless there was a
serious and easily visible problem. The only thing that did occur to me was
input voltage. You're not by any chance firing the thing up on UK 240v
power, and its transformer is actually rated for 100 or 110v ? That would do
it ...

it is 115v plugged into 115v supply
i suppose if i could address the issue of the seemingly unrelated
supply rails i could probably figure it out

if this info helps ....

the machine *was working* when i replaced a VFD display driver
chip. That was easy problem to fix as it was very specific. I
started with closest components, checked pin signals with oscope
and i had a datasheet for guidance. Everything was working i just
needed to bolt it together.

*BUT* i found a yucky ring in peaks of the clock signal and
thought i should do something to repair that (find the source of
ring) again more very easy specific tasks, just follow traces and
check for expected behavior what goes in and what comes out

well i forgot to put the oscope probe tip guard on (to prevent
shorting pins) and i bridged the 32v VFD supply line to the 5V
rail (a little snap) and all sorts fo jitters came out of the
connected devices, i disconnected all those devices and i found
one lone fuse between a bridge and the transformer was blown i
think the 8V or 16V line that supplied the voltage regulators and
servo controler chips {L387,L298}

i replaced fuse , powered on and all three fuses blew

now i am here with very nebulous problem with no specific ideas
about how to repair

looking for help

thanks again for your help arfa,
robb
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
Arfa Daily said:
Do you mean that the 7805 got hot and shut down ? One of those should never
"fry", because they are SOA protected. I suspect that something else
happened there, because if you do the math, it is impossible for 1.5 amps to
flow through a 100 ohm resistor, with only 5v driving it ... Apart from
that, most variations of the 7805 are only rated to 1 amp, although there
are exceptions.

Thanks for help Arfa,
I am describing from memory, the last thing i recall was
decrement to the 100 Ohm resistor and the amp meter's numbers
were jumping around and 1.5 is the largest number i caught with
my eye.

as for fried 7805 ... the 100 ohm resistor started to smoke and i
think i saw the 7805 let out a puff of smoke and now the 7805
does not produce output ? so i assumed it was fried

this all happened very quickly
When you cobbled together your test supply, did you mount
the regulator on a heatsink,
well the regulator had a small flat square of aluminum bolted
to it 1.5cm x 1.5cm x 1 mm when i pulled it from some other pcb
and most importantly, did you place a 4u7 cap, paralleled
with 0u1 cap directly across the output and ground pins of
the regulator, as
close to the device as you could get them?
no


This is *very* important, to prevent the regulator bursting
into vicious ultrasonic or higher oscillation.
ohhhh

It may be just that you reached a current level where this
happened, and the meter didn't know what to do with what it
was measuring, so just displayed some meaningless
nonsense. These regs do get very hot when
they oscillate. Although not strictly necessary,
it's considered good 'belt and braces' to put a 0u1
cap between input and ground pins as well.
i'll try the test again with those cap mods
The more I think about the 'problem' that this board has,
the more non 'real-world' it seems. I can't really see
any reason why three unrelated
fuses, on three unrelated rails, should have blown,
unless there was a serious and easily visible
problem. The only thing
that did occur to me was input voltage.
You're not by any chance firing the thing up
on UK 240v power, and its transformer is actually
rated for 100 or 110v ?That would do
it ...

it is 115v plugged into 115v supply

i wish i knew enough to speculate the connection , for now i
can only report what i see and do. i suppose if i could address
the issue of the seemingly unrelated supply rails i could
probably figure it out

FWIW, if this info helps ....

the machine *was working* when i replaced a VFD display driver
chip. That was an easy problem to fix as it was very specific. I
started with components that were related to the VFD (ie. driver
chip) , i checked pin signals with oscope and i had a datasheet
for guidance. Driver chip had 6 bad lines that would not allow
user button presses to be seen by main board. I replace the DIP40
with a PLCC chip and Everything was working i just needed to
re-assemble and bolt the pieces together.

***BUT***
i stumbled across a "yucky" ring in the peaks of the clock signal
to the VFD driver chip and i thought i should do something to
repair that (ie find the source of ring) again more very easy
specific tasks, just follow traces and check for expected
behavior (in vs outs) what goes in and what comes out

well i forgot to put the oscope probe tip guard on (to prevent
shorting pins) and i bridged the 32v VFD supply line to the 5V
rail (a little arc snap) and all sorts of jitters came out of the
connected devices, i disconnected all those devices and i found
one lone fuse between a bridge and the transformer was blown. i
think the 8V or 16V line that supplied the voltage regulators and
servo controler chips {L387,L298, etc}

i replaced the one fuse, powered on and all three fuses blew

since then i have checked transformer output (ok), desoldered the
L298/L387 ics, continuity tests on various parts of PCB (73 Ohms
between 5v and 0V all around the board), tried to feed 5v into
the 5v line as suggested on the group to feel for warming
components,

now i am here with a very nebulous problem with no specific ideas
about how to repair

and looking for help

thanks again for your help arfa,
robb

BTW there are pictures of all this stuff on
(alt.binaries.schematic.electronics)
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
Arfa Daily said:
Do you mean that the 7805 got hot and shut down ? One of those should never
"fry", because they are SOA protected. I suspect that something else
happened there, because if you do the math, it is impossible for 1.5 amps to
flow through a 100 ohm resistor, with only 5v driving it ... Apart from
that, most variations of the 7805 are only rated to 1 amp, although there
are exceptions.

Thanks for help Arfa,
I am describing from memory, the last thing i recall was
decrement to the 100 Ohm resistor and the amp meter's numbers
were jumping around and 1.5 is the largest number i caught with
my eye.

as for fried 7805 ... the 100 ohm resistor started to smoke and i
think i saw the 7805 let out a puff of smoke and now the 7805
does not produce output ? so i assumed it was fried

this all happened very quickly
When you cobbled together your test supply, did you mount
the regulator on a heatsink,
well the regulator had a small flat square of aluminum bolted
to it 1.5cm x 1.5cm x 1 mm when i pulled it from some other pcb
and most importantly, did you place a 4u7 cap, paralleled
with 0u1 cap directly across the output and ground pins of
the regulator, as
close to the device as you could get them?
no


This is *very* important, to prevent the regulator bursting
into vicious ultrasonic or higher oscillation.
ohhhh

It may be just that you reached a current level where this
happened, and the meter didn't know what to do with what it
was measuring, so just displayed some meaningless
nonsense. These regs do get very hot when
they oscillate. Although not strictly necessary,
it's considered good 'belt and braces' to put a 0u1
cap between input and ground pins as well.
i'll try the test again with those cap mods
The more I think about the 'problem' that this board has,
the more non 'real-world' it seems. I can't really see
any reason why three unrelated
fuses, on three unrelated rails, should have blown,
unless there was a serious and easily visible
problem. The only thing
that did occur to me was input voltage.
You're not by any chance firing the thing up
on UK 240v power, and its transformer is actually
rated for 100 or 110v ?That would do
it ...

it is 115v plugged into 115v supply

i wish i knew enough to speculate the connection , for now i
can only report what i see and do. i suppose if i could address
the issue of the seemingly unrelated supply rails i could
probably figure it out

FWIW, if this info helps ....

the machine *was working* when i replaced a VFD display driver
chip. That was an easy problem to fix as it was very specific. I
started with components that were related to the VFD (ie. driver
chip) , i checked pin signals with oscope and i had a datasheet
for guidance. Driver chip had 6 bad lines that would not allow
user button presses to be seen by main board. I replace the DIP40
with a PLCC chip and Everything was working i just needed to
re-assemble and bolt the pieces together.

***BUT***
i stumbled across a "yucky" ring in the peaks of the clock signal
to the VFD driver chip and i thought i should do something to
repair that (ie find the source of ring) again more very easy
specific tasks, just follow traces and check for expected
behavior (in vs outs) what goes in and what comes out

well i forgot to put the oscope probe tip guard on (to prevent
shorting pins) and i bridged the 32v VFD supply line to the 5V
rail (a little arc snap) and all sorts of jitters came out of the
connected devices, i disconnected all those devices and i found
one lone fuse between a bridge and the transformer was blown. i
think the 8V or 16V line that supplied the voltage regulators and
servo controler chips {L387,L298, etc}

i replaced the one fuse, powered on and all three fuses blew

since then i have checked transformer output (ok), desoldered the
L298/L387 ics, continuity tests on various parts of PCB (73 Ohms
between 5v and 0V all around the board), tried to feed 5v into
the 5v line as suggested on the group to feel for warming
components,

now i am here with a very nebulous problem with no specific ideas
about how to repair

and looking for help

thanks again for your help arfa,
robb

BTW there are pictures of all this stuff on
(alt.binaries.schematic.electronics)
 
C

clifto

Jan 1, 1970
0
robb said:
I connected the 5v (through 450 Ohm) to the PCB 5v and 0v lines.
i measured ~60 mA curent nothing warmed ...

That's pretty good. If you then shorted the PCB 5V and 0V lines, you would
have 450 ohms across 5V and should read 11.1 ma.
i idecremented the
resistance by 100 for each iteration of testing the measured
currernt increased slightly until i made it to (100 Ohms) and
then the current spiked to ~+ 1.5A and the 7805 fried ?

To get 1.5A through 100 ohms you need to apply at least 150V to it.
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
clifto said:
That's pretty good. If you then shorted the PCB 5V and 0V lines, you would
have 450 ohms across 5V and should read 11.1 ma.


To get 1.5A through 100 ohms you need to apply at least 150V to it.

thanks for reply clifto,

i will have to believe you on the numbers

and although the numbers may seem incorrect from a electronic
formulaic analysis i can only report what i see on the equipment
i use and with the setup i use.

The DMM amp reading numbers were fluctuating wildly on my last
test and 1.57 ???was something i thought flashed by as highest #
maybe it was .57 but i do know that whatever the number the 100
ohm resistor had a stream of smoke going up and the 7805 appeared
to have a puff of smoke released before i could dis-connect now
i am hopping somebody can help me decipher what went wrong with
my testing

even operator errors would be useful as long as it helps nme
omove toward a repair/
robb
 
I'm reading this thread with some interest, but I'm more puzzled as it
goes on, there should be something we are (and the OP is) missing.

....
....
it.

thanks for reply clifto,

i will have to believe you on the numbers

and although the numbers may seem incorrect from a electronic
formulaic analysis i can only report what i see on the equipment
i use and with the setup i use.

The DMM amp reading numbers were fluctuating wildly on my last
test and 1.57 ???was something i thought flashed by as highest #
maybe it was .57 but i do know that whatever the number the 100
ohm resistor had a stream of smoke going up and the 7805 appeared
to have a puff of smoke released before i could dis-connect now
i am hopping somebody can help me decipher what went wrong with
my testing

hmm 78xx don't smoke easily, maybe if you apply a too high input
voltage (> 30V I believe) or if it goes into self-oscillation if an
output capacitor is omitted. A 100 ohm resistor, assuming we are
talking about a 1/4 W one or bigger, shouldn't smoke easily with only
5V even on a short to ground, it should become quite hot but not smoke
instantly, if it smoked I believe the input voltage was higher.

Power supply problems shouldn't be that difficult to troubleshoot,
even if once I had almost the same problem with a simple three tubes
amplifier, but that was another story :)

Regards
Francesco
 
I

ian field

Jan 1, 1970
0
I'm reading this thread with some interest, but I'm more puzzled as it
goes on, there should be something we are (and the OP is) missing.

AIUI the OP is trying to find which/how many 5V rail devices on a heavily
populated logic board are S/C after a short between 36V & 5V feeds.

A slightly risky strategy would be to use the 5V O/P from an old (pre-3.3V)
AT PSU, which typically can supply 200A or more via progressively lower
current limiting resistors, at some point the current will be high enough to
distinctly heat any S/C components enabling rapid identification, obvious
pitfalls are S/C Unobtainable Logic Arrays, firmware ROMs the supplier
refuse to sell as spares, the risk of blowing circuit traces (unrepairable
in multi-layer boards) and the risk to eyesight from exploding S/C
capacitors!
 
C

clifto

Jan 1, 1970
0
robb said:
thanks for reply clifto,

i will have to believe you on the numbers

and although the numbers may seem incorrect from a electronic
formulaic analysis i can only report what i see on the equipment
i use and with the setup i use.

What I was trying to get you to realize is that there is probably a
problem with your equipment, or with your understanding of its use.
When the PCB supposedly draws over five times as much current as a
dead short, it should tell you that what you think you're seeing isn't
what is actually happening.
The DMM amp reading numbers were fluctuating wildly on my last
test and 1.57 ???was something i thought flashed by as highest #
maybe it was .57 but i do know that whatever the number the 100
ohm resistor had a stream of smoke going up and the 7805 appeared
to have a puff of smoke released before i could dis-connect now
i am hopping somebody can help me decipher what went wrong with
my testing

If you used a 1/10 watt 100 ohm resistor, putting 5 volts across it
should dissipate 2-1/2 times its capability, or 0.25 W. That might
make it release smoke.
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
clifto said:
robb said:
to it.

thanks for reply clifto,

i will have to believe you on the numbers

and although the numbers may seem incorrect from a electronic
formulaic analysis i can only report what i see on the equipment
i use and with the setup i use.

What I was trying to get you to realize is that there is probably a
problem with your equipment, or with your understanding of its use.
When the PCB supposedly draws over five times as much current as a
dead short, it should tell you that what you think you're seeing isn't
what is actually happening.
[trim]

If you used a 1/10 watt 100 ohm resistor, putting 5 volts across it
should dissipate 2-1/2 times its capability, or 0.25 W. That might
make it release smoke.

Thanks for help clifto,

i do realize what you are saying which is why i said, "i
consider operator error to be a possible problem".
this amateur horse brain needs some help getting itself in front
of the cart.

i've been told that the 73 Ohm resistance between the 5V and 0v
is not so bad and is somewhat hopeful that i did not incinerate
all the ICs.

if i can diagnose without removing the ICs then that would be
great, otherwise i may need to fall back to brute force
diagnostics and remove ICs one at atime and check things and
iterate .

i was hoping to learn something a little more sophisticated.

i was uing 1/4 watt resistors.

i plan to try the capacitors to prevent oscillation,

thanks for help and for any more ideas you may have,
robb
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
I'm reading this thread with some interest, but I'm more puzzled as it
goes on, there should be something we are (and the OP is) missing.



hmm 78xx don't smoke easily, maybe if you apply a too high input
voltage (> 30V I believe) or if it goes into self-oscillation if an
output capacitor is omitted. A 100 ohm resistor, assuming we are
talking about a 1/4 W one or bigger, shouldn't smoke easily with only
5V even on a short to ground, it should become quite hot but not smoke
instantly, if it smoked I believe the input voltage was higher.
thanks for help Francesco,

i do not under-estimate my ability to mis-understand.
so i consider myself missing something as distinct possibility.

but what ?

source is a 18-24v ac 1000mA wall wart that feeds the bridge and
then 7805.
Power supply problems shouldn't be that difficult to troubleshoot,
even if once I had almost the same problem with a simple three tubes
amplifier, but that was another story :)
someoner suggested that i add caps to prevent oscillation i will
try and i hope to give more accurate report and numbers after i
make the change.

thanks for help francesco and any other ideas you may have,
robb
 
R

robb

Jan 1, 1970
0
ian field said:
news:[email protected]m... missing.

AIUI the OP is trying to find which/how many 5V rail devices on a heavily
populated logic board are S/C after a short between 36V & 5V feeds.

A slightly risky strategy would be to use the 5V O/P from an old (pre-3.3V)
AT PSU, which typically can supply 200A or more via progressively lower
current limiting resistors, at some point the current will be high enough to
distinctly heat any S/C components enabling rapid identification, obvious
pitfalls are S/C Unobtainable Logic Arrays, firmware ROMs the supplier
refuse to sell as spares, the risk of blowing circuit traces (unrepairable
in multi-layer boards) and the risk to eyesight from exploding S/C
capacitors!

Ian has the problem packaged precisely in a nutshell.

but i don't remember the explosion risks better get my safety
glasses.

having said that ian i think i will desolder the rom, ram, and
8031 just in case they are ok and are not replaceable as you
point out.

the board was mfg mid 80's so i am pretty certain it is only two
layer board.

thanks for the nutshell version,
robb
 
I

ian field

Jan 1, 1970
0
robb said:
Ian has the problem packaged precisely in a nutshell.

but i don't remember the explosion risks better get my safety
glasses.

having said that ian i think i will desolder the rom, ram, and
8031 just in case they are ok and are not replaceable as you
point out.

the board was mfg mid 80's so i am pretty certain it is only two
layer board.

thanks for the nutshell version,
robb

In my experience of situations like this (such as regulation failure in a
SMPSU) its quite common for a small number of devices - sometimes as few as
1, to go S/C and "crowbar" the rail effectively protecting the remainder of
devices. Occasionally a few devices will blow O/C instantaneously after
going S/C, which can lead to further problems after the S/C devices are
replaced - if the Vcc bond wire to the S/C die blows, the I/P & O/P pins cn
the S/C die can load the O/Ps of other chips connected to it, this can be
tedious to trace on bussed logic, its possible to snip the tops of DIL chip
pins to isolate the chip while leaving enough pin on the chip body to solder
the pin back on to (you can always replace the chip later if you want to)
with the pin isolated you can use a pulse injector and scope to find if the
snipped chip or something else on the bus line is still holding it down.
 
A

Arfa Daily

Jan 1, 1970
0
i plan to try the capacitors to prevent oscillation,

That is the most important thing that you must do before going any further.
If not properly bypassed, 78 series regulators will *readily* oscillate
violently, particularly if you have long leads attached to them. Connect 0u1
between "in" and ground, and 4u7 in parallel with 0u1 between "out" and
ground. It is *essential* that these are soldered *directly* to the pins of
the device, not some distance away down the connecting wires.

Arfa
 
C

clifto

Jan 1, 1970
0
Arfa said:
That is the most important thing that you must do before going any further.
If not properly bypassed, 78 series regulators will *readily* oscillate
violently, particularly if you have long leads attached to them. Connect 0u1
between "in" and ground, and 4u7 in parallel with 0u1 between "out" and
ground. It is *essential* that these are soldered *directly* to the pins of
the device, not some distance away down the connecting wires.

Might as well add the back-bias protection diode with anode at "out" and
cathode at "in" while he's at it.
 
A

Arfa Daily

Jan 1, 1970
0
clifto said:
Might as well add the back-bias protection diode with anode at "out" and
cathode at "in" while he's at it.

Yeah, if you like, though probably an unnecessary complication for this test
setup. Going back to the story of how this unfortunate situation arose, I
think that there is a valuable lesson for Robb to add to what he's learning
here, and that is "If it ain't broke, don't fix it ..." The fact that it was
working after replacing the VFD driver chip, should have been an end to the
job. It obviously didn't matter that the clock was a bit scruffy, as
observed on the 'scope, as the item was managing to use it satisfactorily.
Depending on how fast the clock is, and how good a probe was being used on
the 'scope, the signal may not even have been 'wrong' in the first place. It
might just have *looked* as though it was. It's pretty likely that any clock
inputs on the chips are internally schmitt'd anyway, to make sure that a
clean signal is being passed on into the chip's circuitry.

Arfa
 
E

Eeyore

Jan 1, 1970
0
Arfa said:
Apart from that, most variations of the 7805 are only rated to 1 amp

Not any more.

1.5A is the norm. Look at any up-to-date data sheet.

Graham
 
A

Arfa Daily

Jan 1, 1970
0
Eeyore said:
Not any more.

1.5A is the norm. Look at any up-to-date data sheet.

Graham

I wouldn't say it was "the norm". A quick look at Farnell's catalogue shows
at least as many 1 amp variations of the 7805, as 1.5 amp ones. Maplin,
probably the biggest supplier in the UK to the amateur market, as well as
having a professional supply division, doesn't even list any 1.5 amp
versions of the standard 78xx and 79xx series devices, although they do keep
a small range of 2 amp devices. I would also contend that any device older
than 5 years is pretty much certain to be only 1 amp rated, and Robb's
original fitted to a board from the 80s will definitely be.

Arfa

Arfa
 
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