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UHF receiver issue

docers

Oct 21, 2022
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Hi, somehow broke the uhf receiver. It still connects to mic but not able to transmit to speaker. I think the mic rod out of speaker is off. I bought 6.5 mm mono audio jack but till I know what to solder to where I can not. Hope someone can guide me and I do not need to invest again but new set of mic and receiver. Attached few pics.. newbie in this so please bare with terms I am using here
 

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73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
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Sir docers . . . . . .

{Start 144 point font size} WHY FOR ? {End 144 point font size}
You no give brand and model number . . . .
After a GOOGLE image search ,I did finally find a wireless mike using this HIGH techology . . .as.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/265751287689?chn=ps&mkevt=1&mkcid=28
and its mike as

It has an internal mini display and two switches.
So . . . . if your unit is using the two connection mini phone plug jack as seen in your box at the top, hard wired between the two parts..
That means a ground wire and one shielded wire is connecting your two units.
So o o o o o that means some COMPLEX design using a microprocessor in the mike and another unit to handshake and send MULTIPLEXED data thru that one wire that connects to the main units microprocessor.
By multiplexed I mean broken up into separate, very very very short, time slots to repetitively send data packs between the units with their microprocessors unsorting and changing back at each end.
E.G. that display info has to be sent and restructured back, also the audio has to be sent the same way, also the status of those switches , and operating power also.
Getting . . . . . COMPLEX . . . . . . isn't it . . . .. and that's very heavy on the COMM . . . . . and also having to be miniaturized to fit in the mike housing.
So now time to shift brain out of neutral and REALLY think . . . .If you get a good mini plug connection, is the display on the mike still displaying ? and if so are the buttons functioning.
If so, all is well in the mentioned wiring between units with only the internal mike element and its adjunct audio portion being faulted.
There would be the fully analog and mechanical mike element and then the need of a bit of audio processing / amplification until it takes the aforementioned treatment in going down the 1 wire in sharing micro time slots..

So with probability of mike fault in housing aspects. In my experiencing mike construction, one usually sees a very very very fine set of solid enameled copper wires coning out of the mike element to go to make connection. That is usually lightly coated wiith a Duco cement film.
If that mike has been dropped on a concrete or hard surface, one of those two wires might have been fractured open in the connecting wiring points. An ohmmeter is the testing instrument.
Side Thought . . . .
As a non invasive test, as would be done by myself, would be to get an AC powered inductor . . .to wit . . . a WELLER or WEN soldering gun which has a transformer which will radiate out a strong AC magnetic field, or a TV degaussing coil , or an AC bulk tape eraser or an AC powered tape head demagnetizer.
Any of these then kissing that mike end and powered up should be getting different degrees of hum being sent back to the unit . . . suggesting an inactive mike element unit.
IF the created hum is being converted and sent to the companion unit and coming out as hum.


Thaaaaaaaaaasit . . . . .

73's de Edd . . . . .
.
 

docers

Oct 21, 2022
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Oct 21, 2022
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Thanks. The metal rod that is visible out of receiver is disconnected. Does that connect to top or motherboard? Can I just solder that?
 

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73's de Edd

Aug 21, 2015
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Using photo 1 . . . . . seems like that shielded line running to the left, is your received audio output.

Now, from right of pcb board center . . .of a BLURRED picture . . . . might that end 2 or 3 ? position switch be for a choice of received frequency operation and seems like the very bottom rod would be the units RECEIVE antenna.
 

walishahid333

Nov 1, 2022
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I read in article about this
In this article we'll continue our series on electronics troubleshooting, with a look at VHF/UHF transmitters. Most problems fall into a few basic categories: (1) low or no power output; (2) no modulation; (3) incorrect frequency of operation; and (4) problems with the CTCSS encoder.

As usual, start by connecting the transmitter/transceiver to an adequate power supply. A transmitter rated at 45 watts cannot properly operate from a 12 volt, 3 amp supply! The transmitter will probably blow the fuse in the supply the second it is keyed. Of course, when testing any transmitter, it is recommended that you connect it to a dummy load or terminating wattmeter to avoid interference with other stations sharing the frequency.

After the unit is properly connected, performance tests can be made to determine where the problem is. Power output can be checked with a wattmeter, frequency of operation with a frequency counter or error meter on a communications analyzer, and deviation with a deviation meter. These three tests will give you a good idea of where to begin.
 

davenn

Moderator
Sep 5, 2009
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I read in article about this
In this article we'll continue our series on electronics troubleshooting, with a look at VHF/UHF transmitters. Most problems fall into a few basic categories: (1) low or no power output; (2) no modulation; (3) incorrect frequency of operation; and (4) problems with the CTCSS encoder.

As usual, start by connecting the transmitter/transceiver to an adequate power supply. A transmitter rated at 45 watts cannot properly operate from a 12 volt, 3 amp supply! The transmitter will probably blow the fuse in the supply the second it is keyed. Of course, when testing any transmitter, it is recommended that you connect it to a dummy load or terminating wattmeter to avoid interference with other stations sharing the frequency.

After the unit is properly connected, performance tests can be made to determine where the problem is. Power output can be checked with a wattmeter, frequency of operation with a frequency counter or error meter on a communications analyzer, and deviation with a deviation meter. These three tests will give you a good idea of where to begin.

Not relevant to the OP's problem
 
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