Maker Pro
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Using mobile phone as an internet radio

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George Herold

Jan 1, 1970
0
Oscillating filament light bulb:
<
>
Whether the earths magnetic field is strong enough to induce such
oscillations is questionable.

While digging for the apparently mythical lifetime test data on
incandescent light bulbs, I've found numerous theories on why
filaments fail.

Grin, the internet as a 'fire hose' of information. I went searching
for something that contained "Philips tech. rev." and found a
reference to the following article,

H. Horster, E. Kauer and W. Lechner — The Burn-out Mechanism of
Incandescent Lamps Philips Technical Review 32,155-164, 1971.

It was referenced in "Illuminating Engineering - Page 32 - Google
Books"

But nothing about turn on failure... sigh.

Here is a patent by some of the same guys at Philips... lots of stuff
about the filament getting hottest in the middle.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/3868159.html
(Actually a decently written patent.)

George H.



Tungsten evaporation, causing hot spots, is the most
common.  One suggested that thermal cycling hardens the tungsten and
makes it brittle.  Another suggested that the inrush current causes a
mechanical shock if it hits at the 60Hz peak, instead of at the zero
crossing.  Yet another speculates that the temperature differential
between the hot filament, and the relatively cold mounting structure
may cause cracking.

--
Jeff Liebermann     [email protected]
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann     AE6KS    831-336-2558

G
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael A. Terrell said:
Me, either. It's probably that their postal system won't come to
reasonable terms with the US postal system.

Other countries seem quite happy to use ordinary post to the UK. The US,
not. So explain that.
 
I can believe that the filament is hottest in the middle. It's
furtherst from the support, so whatever conductive heat sinking there is
will be less, but more than that, it sees the radiative input from the
rest of the filament on both sides instead of just one.

Aren't the filaments welded to the elements at the ends? It would seem that
this would cause a narrowing. ISTR most filaments broken near the supports,
which would be counter to the hotter-in-the-middle theory.

My theory is that bulbs tend to fail when turned on because of the thermal
shock but only because they were about to fail anyway. Cycling, itself,
doesn't have a huge effect on longevity, certainly not a factor of two.
Sort of similar to the case of a long solenoid, whose B field at the
ends is half what it is in the middle.

Do they only burn out when energized? ;-)
 
T

T

Jan 1, 1970
0
It may be bad for the battery

My favorite apps on my phone:

TuneIn, Pandora, ScannerRadioPro, EchoLink and RepeaterBook.

And that's kind of why I got the extended battery pack for the phone.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael A. Terrell said:
Sigh. Ask 'your' post office why the rates are so damn high. The
rates are agreed on between countries, and the British system is the
only that people constantly complain about. Likely high tarriffs on
imports from the US that are imposed on incoming goods.

Sigh. Try reading what was said. Most US companies refuse to send anything
to the UK by normal post. They insist on using a courier service. If the
fault was at the UK end, this would apply to all other countries sending
things here. I know logic isn't your strong point - at least compared to
your blind patriotism - but even then...
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Jan 1, 1970
0
The Americans do seem generally to be used to sending a lot by courier
when we would just put in the post.

Quite. And I was simply guessing at an explanation. Any better guesses
happily considered.
Tending to happen in the UK also
even though the Royal Mail / Parcelforce often give a better service and
of course do not charge extra to send further. There has been a big
campaign in the North of Scotland about companies charging extra for
many postcode areas.

It's what happens when private firms cherry pick the most profitable stuff.
 
B

Bob Masta

Jan 1, 1970
0
Me, either. It's probably that their postal system won't come to
reasonable terms with the US postal system.

I've never had a package stolen from the USPS, but I *have*
had one stolen from UPS.

Back in 1974 I had some stereo equipment stolen in a
break-in, and ordered a replacement to be sent UPS. The
shipment arrived while I was at work, so they left a note
that they'd try the next day. I called and said I'd pick it
up from their office after I got off work.

It was December, so there was a long line. After an
interminable wait, they said they didn't have the package...
must've gone out for delivery again by mistake. Got home,
no note. Called again and repeated everything the next day.

They finally admitted that they couldn't find the package,
and blamed it on the seasonal help. They eventually paid
for a replacement, after a lot of paperwork.

In all the years since, though, I've never had a problem.
(Of course, I became gun-shy about ordering "good stuff" in
December!)

Best regards,


Bob Masta

DAQARTA v7.10
Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
www.daqarta.com
Scope, Spectrum, Spectrogram, Sound Level Meter
Frequency Counter, Pitch Track, Pitch-to-MIDI
FREE Signal Generator, DaqMusic generator
Science with your sound card!
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Jan 1, 1970
0
That's mostly a business etiquette thing, I think. Sending somebody a
bunch of business documents in the snail mail sort of says that their
input isn't that urgent. Letter mail here is also very secure IME.

Fine if 'they' want to do this and pay for it. My complaint is buying
goods from the US where I'm paying the P&P and not having the choice of a
reasonably priced service. Why would I want to pay in some cases more than
the value of the goods for postage, if I'm in no rush to receive them?
 
The feedthroughs are made of Dumet, which is basically 42Ni stainless
with a borated copper coating to bind to the glass. It's much
lower-melting than the tungsten, so spot-welding them together shouldn't
affect the tungsten much.

Welding5 is welding. Metal has to flow, no?
A necked-down hot spot is a stress concentration point, and ones nearer
the support would have more mass hanging off them. When the filament
jumps at turn-on, hot spots at the ends will probably more torque applied.


I've never seen one burn out that wasn't energized.

OK, perhaps I sh6ould have said *as* they-re energized (to keep th6e corollary
with light bulbs burning out when turned on).
But you're the big-iron transmitter guy.
^^^^^^^^^^^

Huh? I think you have me confused with someone else.
Gotta run, I have a bunch of guys coming to
the lab in a few minutes, and I have to start the coffee pot!

Most important. Get the good stuff.
 
The Americans do seem generally to be used to sending a lot by courier
when we would just put in the post.

"Courier"? Do you mean "next day" services like FedEx and UPS? Yes, often
time is money. "Couriers" are sometimes (rarely) used for intra'-city
delivery when hours count. Intrest on a megabuck pays for courier service.
Tending to happen in the UK also
even though the Royal Mail / Parcelforce often give a better service and
of course do not charge extra to send further. There has been a big
campaign in the North of Scotland about companies charging extra for
many postcode areas.

Your point?
 
G

Geoffrey S. Mendelson

Jan 1, 1970
0
Phil said:
The logistics companies give you one
tracking number that works anywhere in the world, whereas the post
offices all generate confusion and duplicated numbers that make it very
hard to establish whether something got delivered, and if not, where it
went.

Registered mail uses one tracking number worldwide too. It's R, a letter,
a fixed length string of numbers and the country code. I can track a
letter or package sent registered mail from almost any country on
17track.net, several other similar sites, and once it is here on the
Israel postal site.

The problem with the US is that they send regular international mail
using a tracking number with an L at the begining, and those are
tracked as far as the first post office the sender drops them off at.

Occasionally they are tracked to a sorting center, but not always, and usually
not.

Several years ago the USPS restructured their rates for mail outside of the
US. They dropped surface mail, replacing it with an air mail system that
takes almost as long. I have had packages take 6 weeks to arrive here airmail
from the US.

They did a survey of prices of the courier services, and simply charge 1/2
of what the courier services do. If you want registered mail, they charge
another $12 or so for it.

Compare that to China which charges a few dollars to send a package, and
another dollar or so for registered mail. Or the UK (and the rest of the
EU) that charge about $5 for postage and registered mail.


US postal rates are also quite low, which may make it more difficult for
them to negotiate a revenue sharing agreement with higher cost
organizations.

No, they are rediculously high. Much more than an other postal service
for international mail, they also have a very high theft rate, and will
not insure their packages.

As for rates, everyone pays the same rate by international treaty. So the
eBay vendor in central China that pays a few dollars to send his package
is paying the Israel post office the same amount to deliver my mail as
the vendor from the US that pays $16 for the same size package.

The profit/cost above it goes to their national post offices.

It's like cellular roaming rates. I pay .73 NIS ($.20US) per minue to call
on my cell phone from all over europe back to Israel, or to the US.

Someone with a US company can easily pay $3 for the same call, BUT their
cellular company paid the local company the same amount as mine did for
taking the call and forwarding it over international long distance
lines.

Geoff.
 
§

§ñühwö£f

Jan 1, 1970
0
Phil said:
[......]

Stew Leonard's Espresso Roast, roasted fresh daily in sunny Yonkers.
Best beans I've ever come across, and worth the trip. Always a crowd
pleaser.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
Sorry to hijack this thread but I have an actual electronics repair
question: how do I go about getting my old AIWA CX-NA10 stereo system to
read CD's again? Is the lazer bad? It detects the cd and spins up but
wont play it.



--
http://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com
www.snuhwolf.9f.com|www.savewolves.org
_____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
/ __/ |/ / / / / // // . . \\ \ |\ | / __ \ \ \ __\
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/___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
 
§

§ñühwö£f

Jan 1, 1970
0
Phil said:
Phil said:
[......]

Stew Leonard's Espresso Roast, roasted fresh daily in sunny Yonkers.
Best beans I've ever come across, and worth the trip. Always a crowd
pleaser.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs
Sorry to hijack this thread but I have an actual electronics repair
question: how do I go about getting my old AIWA CX-NA10 stereo system to
read CD's again? Is the lazer bad? It detects the cd and spins up but
wont play it.
You're no fun anymore.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Uh huh. I fixed it somewhat by fiddling with the screw behind the back
cover. G00gle told me how. You lot are obviously quite useless.

<nods>


--
http://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com/
www.friendsofanimals.org |www.snuhwolf.9f.com|
_____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
/ __/ |/ / / / / // // . . \\ \ |\ | / __ \ \ \ __\
_\ \/ / /_/ / _ / \ / \ \| \| \ \_\ \ \__\ _\
/___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
 
G

Geoffrey S. Mendelson

Jan 1, 1970
0
Phil said:
Sounds like a bargain to me. Very few other organizations would leave
money on the table like that. I sure wouldn't. Would you?

It depends upon wat you consider a fair price and what you want people to do.
If you want people from the US to NOT export cheap items then you keep your
postal rates high.

If you want everyone to have a small business selling items over the internet
then you keep your postal prices low.
Plus they save on duty by claiming that everything is a gift. Such
generous folks, those Chinese.

The only gift is to the customs officers receiving the packages. If it is
a gift and the price is low, then they can pass it without inspection, and
if it is inspected just look for the diamonds, guns, drugs, etc hidden
in it.

For example, just ordered about several each of 10 different items
(around 40 items in all), from a vendor in Hong Kong. If he sent it to a
US address and lists it as a gift, the US customs can do a quick inspection
if they do any at all.

If he declares each item, and they inspect the package, they have to figure
out which is which, measure and weigh them and ascertain that they are
what is claimed, and the weight matches.

In this case most of the items were some some sort of USB fob, so good luck.
What treaties are those, and do they guarantee the same rates for everyone?

They are international postal treaties and the guarantee the same rates
between signatories. Or in plain English, each country pays the other
the same rates, but are free to charge their internal customers anything
they want.
Depends what's important to you, of course. Mostly when I'm in Europe I
do my calling over wifi using UMA, so it costs the same as at home. But
I only go there every couple of years.

Assuming you can find WiFi. Some places think free wifi is a right, others
charge you high rates for it.

Geoff.
 
J

Jamie

Jan 1, 1970
0
§ñühwö£f said:
Phil said:
Phil Hobbs wrote:

[......]

Stew Leonard's Espresso Roast, roasted fresh daily in sunny Yonkers.
Best beans I've ever come across, and worth the trip. Always a crowd
pleaser.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Sorry to hijack this thread but I have an actual electronics repair
question: how do I go about getting my old AIWA CX-NA10 stereo system to
read CD's again? Is the lazer bad? It detects the cd and spins up but
wont play it.
You're no fun anymore.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Uh huh. I fixed it somewhat by fiddling with the screw behind the back
cover. G00gle told me how. You lot are obviously quite useless.

<nods>
Yes we are. Hope to see you soon.

Jamie
 
D

David Woolley

Jan 1, 1970
0
Geoffrey said:
Phil Hobbs wrote:

The only gift is to the customs officers receiving the packages. If it is
a gift and the price is low, then they can pass it without inspection, and
if it is inspected just look for the diamonds, guns, drugs, etc hidden
in it.
For import to the UK, declaring it as a gift increases the value that is
allowed before VAT and duty is imposed, so, when used for items of low
value, but more than £15 (at the moment) including postage, it defrauds
the government of revenue. These are not, I believe free allowances,
but rather values below which it is considered not worth recovering
duty. With the Royal Mail, it also triggers a customs processing charge.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

Jan 1, 1970
0
It depends upon wat you consider a fair price and what you want people
to do. If you want people from the US to NOT export cheap items then you
keep your postal rates high.

That was the point I was trying to make. And it applies to not so cheap
items too.
 
J

Jasen Betts

Jan 1, 1970
0
I've no problem with your marquee story. Sometimes folk-tales about
rocks falling from the sky are correct.
The data point I offer to Phil is that bulbs fail when you turn them
on. I see no reason why that can't be 'played backwards'. There most
be some GE, Philips, (other) report that documents turn on failure.

I recall a few yeas back someone had long-life bulbs with an NTC
series resistor built into the base.
Old toob tellys always had an NTC in series with the filament supply.
 
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