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What are the benefits of a DIN rail?

W

wahzoo

Jan 1, 1970
0
I have only a hobby-level of knowledge about electronics and I seldom
see much about DIN rail use in the hobbiest magazines.

I'm designing a low-voltage lighting system for my house which will
use dozens of power relays mounted in one box. Low voltage switches
will signal relays to turn lights on and off. (No silicon involved.)
Would using a DIN rail be advantagous?

When I install something on the middle of a populated DIN rail, can I
just snap it in or do I have to slide a bunch of existing devices off
the end first?

Also, is there any electrical connection to the rail itself? Is it
ever used for power or ground?

--wahzoo
 
P

Peter Bennett

Jan 1, 1970
0
I have only a hobby-level of knowledge about electronics and I seldom
see much about DIN rail use in the hobbiest magazines.

I'm designing a low-voltage lighting system for my house which will
use dozens of power relays mounted in one box. Low voltage switches
will signal relays to turn lights on and off. (No silicon involved.)
Would using a DIN rail be advantagous?

Rail mount relays may be more expensive than other types - but I think
the rail-mount relays and terminal blocks make a neat and convenient
installation.
When I install something on the middle of a populated DIN rail, can I
just snap it in or do I have to slide a bunch of existing devices off
the end first?

Devices can be snapped on and off the rail - no need to slide things
on from one end.
Also, is there any electrical connection to the rail itself? Is it
ever used for power or ground?

--wahzoo


A DIN rail is just a mounting method - no electrical connections
(although you can get grounding blocks that do provide an electrical
connection to the rail - they are normally used for the safety ground
(green wire in AC wiring)).
 
D

Don A. Gilmore

Jan 1, 1970
0
wahzoo said:
I have only a hobby-level of knowledge about electronics and I seldom
see much about DIN rail use in the hobbiest magazines.

I'm designing a low-voltage lighting system for my house which will
use dozens of power relays mounted in one box. Low voltage switches
will signal relays to turn lights on and off. (No silicon involved.)
Would using a DIN rail be advantagous?

Yes, very much so. I can't even imagine doing it without a DIN rail. You
would have to individually mount each relay. Lots of things are DIN
mounted; not just relays. Terminal strips, motor contactors, PLC's, fuses,
all sorts of stuff.
When I install something on the middle of a populated DIN rail, can I
just snap it in or do I have to slide a bunch of existing devices off
the end first?

Yes, they can be snapped on and off interchangeably. Usually there is a
little release slot that can be pried with a screwdriver to release the
components.
Also, is there any electrical connection to the rail itself? Is it
ever used for power or ground?

Yes, for ground. Most components are insulated from the rail, but there are
special green (or green and yellow) terminal blocks that electrically
connect directly to the rail and thus ground wires to the electrical
enclosure.

Don
 
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