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What soldering iron should I buy for re-soldering cold solder joints on Circuit board

bcolins

May 9, 2024
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Hoping this is the right forum for this post. I have some cold solder joints on an automotive instrument cluster. (Recognized problem with this vehicle). My current soldering gun and iron are not suitable for this sort of work,....so I need suggestions on what iron to buy. I know I need a fine tip and think I need something under 40 or 50 watts, but unsure of exactly what to buy.
Any suggestions?
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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No Lead solder.
RoHS compliance (Restriction of Hazardous Substances) automotive instrument clusters use no lead soldering; they all look like cold solder joints...
Most people cross-contaminate the solder connection by using a different "Euclidic" soldering wire with respect to OEM assembly.

My suggestion would be a pencil type adjustable temperature soldering iron 100 Watts. With various soldering iron tips
The ones I use in the laboratory I could not afford to buy not for the hobbyist.
What is your price range?
 
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bcolins

May 9, 2024
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This instrument cluster is out of a 95 VW Eurovan. Would this have fallen under the ROHS? What is Euclidic?
 

Delta Prime

Jul 29, 2020
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This instrument cluster is out of a 95 VW Eurovan. Would this have fallen under the ROHS?
No. That falls under the European Union directive.
What is Euclidic?
Wikipedia?
That's what people say when it's very common or they don't know what the hell they're talking about.
Metallurgically speaking is the lowest temperature point at which two different metallic alloys "solid " becomes molten, a liquidi t's either solid or a liquid no
(In-between).
Tin Sn 60%, & Lead Pb 40% transforms from a solid to a liquid at 470°f or (243 degrees Celsius).
Formula: 470°F − 32) × 5/9 = 243.333°C
There's no transition or "Plastic Phase!
Unless you blow on the solder connection to rapidly cool it down that's where people really screw up. Never blow on a hot solder connection to cool it down take the heat even if it burns your fingers.photo_1684362670130.png
 
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